#1 Improved Maximum Strength, Vertical Jump and Sprint Performance after 8 Weeks of Jump Squat Training with Individualized Loads Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Vanderka, Marián;Longová, Katarina;Olasz, Dávid;Krčmár, Matús;Walker, Simon

British Journal of Sports Medicine Volume 38, Issue 3

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A high level of strength is inherent in elite soccer play, but the relation between maximal strength and sprint and jumping performance has not been studied thoroughly.


#2 A survey of best practices for RNA-seq data analysis Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Conesa, Ana; Madrigal, Pedro; Tarazona, Sonia; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Cervera Taboada, Alejandra; McPherson, Andrew; Szczesniak, Michal Wojciech; Gaffney, Daniel J.; Elo, Laura L.; Zhang, Xuegong; Mortazavi, Ali

Genome Biology (Online Edition) Volume 17, Issue 1

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RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) has a wide variety of applications, but no single analysis pipeline can be used in all cases. We review all of the major steps in RNA-seq data analysis, including experimental design, quality control, read alignment, quantification of gene and transcript levels, visualization, differential gene expression, alternative splicing, functional analysis, gene fusion detection and eQTL mapping. We highlight the challenges associated with each step. We discuss the analysis of small RNAs and the integration of RNA-seq with other functional genomics techniques. Finally, we discuss the outlook for novel technologies that are changing the state of the art in transcriptomics.


#3 Schizophrenia risk from complex variation of complement component 4 Link logo

Sekar, Aswin; Bialas, Allison R.; de Rivera, Heather; Davis, Avery; Hammond, Timothy R.; Kamitaki, Nolan; Tooley, Katherine; Presumey, Jessy; Baum, Matthew; Van Doren, Vanessa; Genovese, Giulio; Rose, Samuel A.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Daly, Mark J.; Carroll, Michael C.; Stevens, Beth; McCarroll, Steven A.; , ; Paunio, Tiina

Nature Volume 530, Issue 7589, Pages 177–183

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Schizophrenia is a heritable brain illness with unknown pathogenic mechanisms. Schizophrenia's strongest genetic association at a population level involves variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, but the genes and molecular mechanisms accounting for this have been challenging to identify. Here we show that this association arises in part from many structurally diverse alleles of the complement component 4 (C4) genes. We found that these alleles generated widely varying levels of C4A and C4B expression in the brain, with each common C4 allele associating with schizophrenia in proportion to its tendency to generate greater expression of C4A. Human C4 protein localized to neuronal synapses, dendrites, axons, and cell bodies. In mice, C4 mediated synapse elimination during postnatal development. These results implicate excessive complement activity in the development of schizophrenia and may help explain the reduced numbers of synapses in the brains of individuals with schizophrenia.


#4 2016 ESC Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure: The Task Force for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Developed with the special contribution of the Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the ESC PDF logo

Ponikowski P, Voors AA, Anker SD, Bueno H, Cleland JG, Coats AJ, Falk V, González-Juanatey JR, Harjola VP, Jankowska EA, Jessup M, Linde C, Nihoyannopoulos P, Parissis JT, Pieske B, Riley JP, Rosano GM, Ruilope LM, Ruschitzka F, Rutten FH, van der Meer P; Authors/Task Force Members; Document Reviewers

European Heart Journal Volume 37, Issue 27, Pages ehw128–2200

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#5 Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks, 1990-2015:a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015 Link logo PDF logo

Forouzanfar, Mohammad H.; Afshin, Ashkan; Alexander, Lily T.; Anderson, H. Ross; Bhutta, Zulficiar A.; Biryukov, Stan; Brauer, Michael; Burnett, Richard; Cercy, Kelly; Charlson, Fiona J.; Cohen, Aaron J.; Dandona, Lalit; Estep, Kara; Ferrari, Alize J.; Frostad, Joseph J.; Fullman, Nancy; Gething, Peter W.; Godwin, William W.; Griswold, Max; Kinfu, Yohannes

The Lancet Volume 388, Issue 10053, Pages 1659–1724

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The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 provides an up-to-date synthesis of the evidence for risk factor exposure and the attributable burden of disease. By providing national and subnational assessments spanning the past 25 years, this study can inform debates on the importance of addressing risks in context. We used the comparative risk assessment framework developed for previous iterations of the Global Burden of Disease Study to estimate attributable deaths, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), and trends in exposure by age group, sex, year, and geography for 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks from 1990 to 2015. This study included 388 risk-outcome pairs that met World Cancer Research Fund-defined criteria for convincing or probable evidence. We extracted relative risk and exposure estimates from randomised controlled trials, cohorts, pooled cohorts, household surveys, census data, satellite data, and other sources. We used statistical models to pool data, adjust for bias, and incorporate covariates. We developed a metric that allows comparisons of exposure across risk factors-the summary exposure value. Using the counterfactual scenario of theoretical minimum risk level, we estimated the portion of deaths and DALYs that could be attributed to a given risk. We decomposed trends in attributable burden into contributions from population growth, population age structure, risk exposure, and risk-deleted cause-specific DALY rates. We characterised risk exposure in relation to a Socio-demographic Index (SDI). Between 1990 and 2015, global exposure to unsafe sanitation, household air pollution, childhood underweight, childhood stunting, and smoking each decreased by more than 25%. Global exposure for several occupational risks, high body-mass index (BMI), and drug use increased by more than 25% over the same period. All risks jointly evaluated in 2015 accounted for 57·8% (95% CI 56·6-58·8) of global deaths and 41·2% (39·8-42·8) of DALYs. In 2015, the ten largest contributors to global DALYs among Level 3 risks were high systolic blood pressure (211·8 million [192·7 million to 231·1 million] global DALYs), smoking (148·6 million [134·2 million to 163·1 million]), high fasting plasma glucose (143·1 million [125·1 million to 163·5 million]), high BMI (120·1 million [83·8 million to 158·4 million]), childhood undernutrition (113·3 million [103·9 million to 123·4 million]), ambient particulate matter (103·1 million [90·8 million to 115·1 million]), high total cholesterol (88·7 million [74·6 million to 105·7 million]), household air pollution (85·6 million [66·7 million to 106·1 million]), alcohol use (85·0 million [77·2 million to 93·0 million]), and diets high in sodium (83·0 million [49·3 million to 127·5 million]). From 1990 to 2015, attributable DALYs declined for micronutrient deficiencies, childhood undernutrition, unsafe sanitation and water, and household air pollution; reductions in risk-deleted DALY rates rather than reductions in exposure drove these declines. Rising exposure contributed to notable increases in attributable DALYs from high BMI, high fasting plasma glucose, occupational carcinogens, and drug use. Environmental risks and childhood undernutrition declined steadily with SDI; low physical activity, high BMI, and high fasting plasma glucose increased with SDI. In 119 countries, metabolic risks, such as high BMI and fasting plasma glucose, contributed the most attributable DALYs in 2015. Regionally, smoking still ranked among the leading five risk factors for attributable DALYs in 109 countries; childhood underweight and unsafe sex remained primary drivers of early death and disability in much of sub-Saharan Africa. Declines in some key environmental risks have contributed to declines in critical infectious diseases. Some risks appear to be invariant to SDI. Increasing risks, including high BMI, high fasting plasma glucose, drug use, and some occupational exposures, contribute to rising burden from some conditions, but also provide opportunities for intervention. Some highly preventable risks, such as smoking, remain major causes of attributable DALYs, even as exposure is declining. Public policy makers need to pay attention to the risks that are increasingly major contributors to global burden. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


#6 Analysis of protein-coding genetic variation in 60,706 humans Link logo

Lek, Monkol; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Minikel, Eric V.; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Banks, Eric; Fennell, Timothy; O'Donnell-Luria, Anne H.; Ware, James S.; Hill, Andrew J.; Cummings, Beryl B.; Tukiainen, Taru; Birnbaum, Daniel P.; Kosmicki, Jack A.; Duncan, Laramie E.; Estrada, Karol; Zhao, Fengmei; Zou, James; Pierce-Hollman, Emma; Berghout, Joanne; Cooper, David N.

Nature Volume 536, Issue 7616, Pages 285–291

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Large-scale reference data sets of human genetic variation are critical for the medical and functional interpretation of DNA sequence changes. Here we describe the aggregation and analysis of high-quality exome (protein-coding region) DNA sequence data for 60,706 individuals of diverse ancestries generated as part of the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC). This catalogue of human genetic diversity contains an average of one variant every eight bases of the exome, and provides direct evidence for the presence of widespread mutational recurrence. We have used this catalogue to calculate objective metrics of pathogenicity for sequence variants, and to identify genes subject to strong selection against various classes of mutation; identifying 3,230 genes with near-complete depletion of predicted protein-truncating variants, with 72% of these genes having no currently established human disease phenotype. Finally, we demonstrate that these data can be used for the efficient filtering of candidate disease-causing variants, and for the discovery of human 'knockout' variants in protein-coding genes.


#7 Human gut microbes impact host serum metabolome and insulin sensitivity Link logo

Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Nielsen, Henrik Bjorn; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Nielsen, Trine; Jensen, Benjamin A. H.; Forslund, Kristoffer; Hildebrand, Falk; Prifti, Edi; Falony, Gwen; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Levenez, Florence; Dore, Joel; Mattila, Ismo; Plichta, Damian R.; Pöhö, Paivi; Hellgren, Lars I.; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Vieira-Silva, Sara

Nature Volume 535, Issue 7612, Pages 376–381

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Insulin resistance is a forerunner state of ischaemic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we show how the human gut microbiome impacts the serum metabolome and associates with insulin resistance in 277 non-diabetic Danish individuals. The serum metabolome of insulin-resistant individuals is characterized by increased levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), which correlate with a gut microbiome that has an enriched biosynthetic potential for BCAAs and is deprived of genes encoding bacterial inward transporters for these amino acids. Prevotella copri and Bacteroides vulgatus are identified as the main species driving the association between biosynthesis of BCAAs and insulin resistance, and in mice we demonstrate that P. copri can induce insulin resistance, aggravate glucose intolerance and augment circulating levels of BCAAs. Our findings suggest that microbial targets may have the potential to diminish insulin resistance and reduce the incidence of common metabolic and cardiovascular disorders.


#8 Measuring the health-related Sustainable Development Goals in 188 countries:a baseline analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015 Link logo PDF logo

Lim, Stephen S.; Allen, Kate; Bhutta, Zulficiar A.; Dandona, Lalit; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H.; Fullman, Nancy; Gething, Peter W.; Goldberg, Ellen M.; Hay, Simon I.; Holmberg, Mollie; Kinfu, Yohannes; Kutz, Michael J.; Larson, Heidi J.; Liang, Xiaofeng; Lopez, Alan D.; Lozano, Rafael; McNellan, Claire R.; Mokdad, Ali H.; Mooney, Meghan D.; Naghavi, Mohsen

The Lancet Volume 388, Issue 10053, Pages 1813–1850

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In September, 2015, the UN General Assembly established the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs specify 17 universal goals, 169 targets, and 230 indicators leading up to 2030. We provide an analysis of 33 health-related SDG indicators based on the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015). We applied statistical methods to systematically compiled data to estimate the performance of 33 health-related SDG indicators for 188 countries from 1990 to 2015. We rescaled each indicator on a scale from 0 (worst observed value between 1990 and 2015) to 100 (best observed). Indices representing all 33 health-related SDG indicators (health-related SDG index), health-related SDG indicators included in the Millennium Development Goals (MDG index), and health-related indicators not included in the MDGs (non-MDG index) were computed as the geometric mean of the rescaled indicators by SDG target. We used spline regressions to examine the relations between the Socio-demographic Index (SDI, a summary measure based on average income per person, educational attainment, and total fertility rate) and each of the health-related SDG indicators and indices. In 2015, the median health-related SDG index was 59·3 (95% uncertainty interval 56·8-61·8) and varied widely by country, ranging from 85·5 (84·2-86·5) in Iceland to 20·4 (15·4-24·9) in Central African Republic. SDI was a good predictor of the health-related SDG index (r(2)=0·88) and the MDG index (r(2)=0·92), whereas the non-MDG index had a weaker relation with SDI (r(2)=0·79). Between 2000 and 2015, the health-related SDG index improved by a median of 7·9 (IQR 5·0-10·4), and gains on the MDG index (a median change of 10·0 [6·7-13·1]) exceeded that of the non-MDG index (a median change of 5·5 [2·1-8·9]). Since 2000, pronounced progress occurred for indicators such as met need with modern contraception, under-5 mortality, and neonatal mortality, as well as the indicator for universal health coverage tracer interventions. Moderate improvements were found for indicators such as HIV and tuberculosis incidence, minimal changes for hepatitis B incidence took place, and childhood overweight considerably worsened. GBD provides an independent, comparable avenue for monitoring progress towards the health-related SDGs. Our analysis not only highlights the importance of income, education, and fertility as drivers of health improvement but also emphasises that investments in these areas alone will not be sufficient. Although considerable progress on the health-related MDG indicators has been made, these gains will need to be sustained and, in many cases, accelerated to achieve the ambitious SDG targets. The minimal improvement in or worsening of health-related indicators beyond the MDGs highlight the need for additional resources to effectively address the expanded scope of the health-related SDGs. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


#9 Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 315 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE), 1990-2015:a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015 Link logo PDF logo

Kassebaum, Nicholas J.; Arora, Megha; Barber, Ryan M.; Bhutta, Zulfigar A.; Carter, Austin; Casey, Daniel C.; Charlson, Fiona J.; Coates, Matthew M.; Coggeshall, Megan; Cornaby, Leslie; Dandona, Lalit; Dicker, Daniel J.; Erskine, Holly E.; Ferrari, Alize J.; Fitzmaurice, Christina; Foreman, Kyle; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H.; Fullman, Nancy; Gething, Peter W.; Goldberg, Ellen M.

The Lancet Volume 388, Issue 10053, Pages 1603–1658

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Healthy life expectancy (HALE) and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) provide summary measures of health across geographies and time that can inform assessments of epidemiological patterns and health system performance, help to prioritise investments in research and development, and monitor progress toward the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We aimed to provide updated HALE and DALYs for geographies worldwide and evaluate how disease burden changes with development. We used results from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015) for all-cause mortality, cause-specific mortality, and non-fatal disease burden to derive HALE and DALYs by sex for 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2015. We calculated DALYs by summing years of life lost (YLLs) and years of life lived with disability (YLDs) for each geography, age group, sex, and year. We estimated HALE using the Sullivan method, which draws from age-specific death rates and YLDs per capita. We then assessed how observed levels of DALYs and HALE differed from expected trends calculated with the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a composite indicator constructed from measures of income per capita, average years of schooling, and total fertility rate. Total global DALYs remained largely unchanged from 1990 to 2015, with decreases in communicable, neonatal, maternal, and nutritional (Group 1) disease DALYs offset by increased DALYs due to non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Much of this epidemiological transition was caused by changes in population growth and ageing, but it was accelerated by widespread improvements in SDI that also correlated strongly with the increasing importance of NCDs. Both total DALYs and age-standardised DALY rates due to most Group 1 causes significantly decreased by 2015, and although total burden climbed for the majority of NCDs, age-standardised DALY rates due to NCDs declined. Nonetheless, age-standardised DALY rates due to several high-burden NCDs (including osteoarthritis, drug use disorders, depression, diabetes, congenital birth defects, and skin, oral, and sense organ diseases) either increased or remained unchanged, leading to increases in their relative ranking in many geographies. From 2005 to 2015, HALE at birth increased by an average of 2·9 years (95% uncertainty interval 2·9-3·0) for men and 3·5 years (3·4-3·7) for women, while HALE at age 65 years improved by 0·85 years (0·78-0·92) and 1·2 years (1·1-1·3), respectively. Rising SDI was associated with consistently higher HALE and a somewhat smaller proportion of life spent with functional health loss; however, rising SDI was related to increases in total disability. Many countries and territories in central America and eastern sub-Saharan Africa had increasingly lower rates of disease burden than expected given their SDI. At the same time, a subset of geographies recorded a growing gap between observed and expected levels of DALYs, a trend driven mainly by rising burden due to war, interpersonal violence, and various NCDs. Health is improving globally, but this means more populations are spending more time with functional health loss, an absolute expansion of morbidity. The proportion of life spent in ill health decreases somewhat with increasing SDI, a relative compression of morbidity, which supports continued efforts to elevate personal income, improve education, and limit fertility. Our analysis of DALYs and HALE and their relationship to SDI represents a robust framework on which to benchmark geography-specific health performance and SDG progress. Country-specific drivers of disease burden, particularly for causes with higher-than-expected DALYs, should inform financial and research investments, prevention efforts, health policies, and health system improvement initiatives for all countries along the development continuum. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


#10 Variation in microbiome LPS immunogenicity contributes to autoimmunity in humans Link logo PDF logo

Vatanan Tommi; Kostic Aleksander; d'Hennezel Eva; Siljander Heli; Franzosa Eric; Yassour Moran; Kolde Raivo; Vlamakis Hera; Arthur Timothy; Hämäläinen Anu-Maaria; Peet Aleksandr; Tillmann Vallo; Uibo Raivo; Mokurov Sergei; Dorshakova Natalya; Ilonen Jorma; Virtanen Suvi; Szabo Susanne; Porter Jeffrey; Lähdesmäki Harri; Huttenhower Curtis; Gevers Dirk; Cullen Thomas; Knip Mikael and DIABIMMUNE Study Group

Cell Volume 165, Issue 4, Pages 842–853

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According to the hygiene hypothesis, the increasing incidence of autoimmune diseases in western countries may be explained by changes in early microbial exposure, leading to altered immune maturation. We followed gut microbiome development from birth until age three in 222 infants in Northern Europe, where early-onset autoimmune diseases are common in Finland and Estonia but are less prevalent in Russia. We found that Bacteroides species are lowly abundant in Russians but dominate in Finnish and Estonian infants. Therefore, their lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposures arose primarily from Bacteroides rather than from Escherichia coli, which is a potent innate immune activator. We show that Bacteroides LPS is structurally distinct from E. coli LPS and inhibits innate immune signaling and endotoxin tolerance; furthermore, unlike LPS from E. coli, B. dorei LPS does not decrease incidence of autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice. Early colonization by immunologically silencing microbiota may thus preclude aspects of immune education.


#11 The genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes Link logo

Fuchsberger, Christian; Flannick, Jason; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Mahajan, Anubha; Agarwala, Vineeta; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Ma, Clement; Fontanillas, Pierre; Moutsianas, Loukas; McCarthy, Davis J.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Perry, John R. B.; Sim, Xueling; Blackwell, Thomas W.; Robertson, Neil R.; Rayner, N. William; Cingolani, Pablo; Locke, Adam E.; Tajes, Juan Fernandez; Highland, Heather M.

Nature Volume 536, Issue 7614, Pages 41–47

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The genetic architecture of common traits, including the number, frequency, and effect sizes of inherited variants that contribute to individual risk, has been long debated. Genome-wide association studies have identified scores of common variants associated with type 2 diabetes, but in aggregate, these explain only a fraction of the heritability of this disease. Here, to test the hypothesis that lower-frequency variants explain much of the remainder, the GoT2D and T2D-GENES consortia performed whole-genome sequencing in 2,657 European individuals with and without diabetes, and exome sequencing in 12,940 individuals from five ancestry groups. To increase statistical power, we expanded the sample size via genotyping and imputation in a further 111,548 subjects. Variants associated with type 2 diabetes after sequencing were overwhelmingly common and most fell within regions previously identified by genome-wide association studies. Comprehensive enumeration of sequence variation is necessary to identify functional alleles that provide important clues to disease pathophysiology, but large-scale sequencing does not support the idea that lower-frequency variants have a major role in predisposition to type 2 diabetes.


#12 2016 ESC/EAS Guidelines for the Management of Dyslipidaemias Link logo PDF logo

Catapano, Alberico L.; Graham, Ian; De Backer, Guy; Wiklund, Olov; Chapman, M. John; Drexel, Heinz; Hoes, Arno W.; Jennings, Catriona S.; Landmesser, Ulf; Pedersen, Terje R.; Reiner, Zeljko; Riccardi, Gabriele; Taskinen, Marja-Riita; Tokgozoglu, Lale; Monique, W. M.; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Wood, David A.; Luis Zamorano, Jose

European Heart Journal Volume 37, Issue 39, Pages ehw272–3058

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#13 Zika Virus Infection with Prolonged Maternal Viremia and Fetal Brain Abnormalities Link logo

Driggers, R. W.; Ho, C.-Y.; Korhonen, E. M.; Kuivanen, S.; Jääskeläinen, A. J.; Smura, T.; Rosenberg, A.; Hill, D. A.; DeBiasi, R. L.; Vezina, G.; Timofeev, J.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Levanov, L.; Razak, J.; Iyengar, P.; Hennenfent , A.; Kennedy, R.; Lanciotti, R.; du Plessis, A.; Vapalahti, O.

New England Journal of Medicine Volume 374, Issue 22, Pages 2142–2151

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The current outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection has been associated with an apparent increased risk of congenital microcephaly. We describe a case of a pregnant woman and her fetus infected with ZIKV during the 11th gestational week. The fetal head circumference decreased from the 47th percentile to the 24th percentile between 16 and 20 weeks of gestation. ZIKV RNA was identified in maternal serum at 16 and 21 weeks of gestation. At 19 and 20 weeks of gestation, substantial brain abnormalities were detected on ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without the presence of microcephaly or intracranial calcifications. On postmortem analysis of the fetal brain, diffuse cerebral cortical thinning, high ZIKV RNA loads, and viral particles were detected, and ZIKV was subsequently isolated.


#14 Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy (3rd edition) Link logo PDF logo

Klionsky, Daniel J.; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Abe, Akihisa; Abedin, Md Joynal; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Hulmi, Juha J.; Korhonen, Laura; Lindholm, Dan; Screen, Mark; Stratoulias, Vassileios; Zughaier, Susu M.

Autophagy Volume 12, Issue 1, Pages 1–222

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#15 Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 310 diseases and injuries, 1990-2015:a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015 Link logo PDF logo

Vos, Theo; Allen, Christine; Arora, Megha; Barber, Ryan M.; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Brown, Alexandria; Carter, Austin; Casey, Daniel C.; Charlson, Fiona J.; Chen, Alan Z.; Coggeshall, Megan; Cornaby, Leslie; Dandona, Lalit; Dicker, Daniel J.; Dilegge, Tina; Erskine, Holly E.; Ferrari, Alize J.; Fitzmaurice, Christina; Fleming, Tom; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H.

The Lancet Volume 388, Issue 10053, Pages 1545–1602

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Non-fatal outcomes of disease and injury increasingly detract from the ability of the world's population to live in full health, a trend largely attributable to an epidemiological transition in many countries from causes affecting children, to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) more common in adults. For the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015), we estimated the incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for diseases and injuries at the global, regional, and national scale over the period of 1990 to 2015. We estimated incidence and prevalence by age, sex, cause, year, and geography with a wide range of updated and standardised analytical procedures. Improvements from GBD 2013 included the addition of new data sources, updates to literature reviews for 85 causes, and the identification and inclusion of additional studies published up to November, 2015, to expand the database used for estimation of non-fatal outcomes to 60 900 unique data sources. Prevalence and incidence by cause and sequelae were determined with DisMod-MR 2.1, an improved version of the DisMod-MR Bayesian meta-regression tool first developed for GBD 2010 and GBD 2013. For some causes, we used alternative modelling strategies where the complexity of the disease was not suited to DisMod-MR 2.1 or where incidence and prevalence needed to be determined from other data. For GBD 2015 we created a summary indicator that combines measures of income per capita, educational attainment, and fertility (the Socio-demographic Index [SDI]) and used it to compare observed patterns of health loss to the expected pattern for countries or locations with similar SDI scores. We generated 9·3 billion estimates from the various combinations of prevalence, incidence, and YLDs for causes, sequelae, and impairments by age, sex, geography, and year. In 2015, two causes had acute incidences in excess of 1 billion: upper respiratory infections (17·2 billion, 95% uncertainty interval [UI] 15·4-19·2 billion) and diarrhoeal diseases (2·39 billion, 2·30-2·50 billion). Eight causes of chronic disease and injury each affected more than 10% of the world's population in 2015: permanent caries, tension-type headache, iron-deficiency anaemia, age-related and other hearing loss, migraine, genital herpes, refraction and accommodation disorders, and ascariasis. The impairment that affected the greatest number of people in 2015 was anaemia, with 2·36 billion (2·35-2·37 billion) individuals affected. The second and third leading impairments by number of individuals affected were hearing loss and vision loss, respectively. Between 2005 and 2015, there was little change in the leading causes of years lived with disability (YLDs) on a global basis. NCDs accounted for 18 of the leading 20 causes of age-standardised YLDs on a global scale. Where rates were decreasing, the rate of decrease for YLDs was slower than that of years of life lost (YLLs) for nearly every cause included in our analysis. For low SDI geographies, Group 1 causes typically accounted for 20-30% of total disability, largely attributable to nutritional deficiencies, malaria, neglected tropical diseases, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Lower back and neck pain was the leading global cause of disability in 2015 in most countries. The leading cause was sense organ disorders in 22 countries in Asia and Africa and one in central Latin America; diabetes in four countries in Oceania; HIV/AIDS in three southern sub-Saharan African countries; collective violence and legal intervention in two north African and Middle Eastern countries; iron-deficiency anaemia in Somalia and Venezuela; depression in Uganda; onchoceriasis in Liberia; and other neglected tropical diseases in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Ageing of the world's population is increasing the number of people living with sequelae of diseases and injuries. Shifts in the epidemiological profile driven by socioeconomic change also contribute to the continued increase in years lived with disability (YLDs) as well as the rate of increase in YLDs. Despite limitations imposed by gaps in data availability and the variable quality of the data available, the standardised and comprehensive approach of the GBD study provides opportunities to examine broad trends, compare those trends between countries or subnational geographies, benchmark against locations at similar stages of development, and gauge the strength or weakness of the estimates available. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


#16 Gut bacteria that prevent growth impairments transmitted by microbiota from malnourished children Link logo PDF logo

Blanton Laura; Charbonneau Mark; Salih Tarek; Barratt Michael; Venkatesh Siddarth; Ilkaveys Olga; Subramanian Sathish; Manary Mark; Trehan Indi; Jorgensen Josh; Fan Yue-Mei; Henrissat Bernard; Leyn Semen; Rodionov Dmitry; Osterman Andrei; Maleta Keneth; Newgard Chistopher; Ashorn Per; Dewey Kathryn; Gordon Jeffrey

Science Volume 351, Issue 6275, Pages aad3311–aad3311

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Undernourished children exhibit impaired development of their gut microbiota. Transplanting microbiota from 6- and 18-month-old healthy or undernourished Malawian donors into young germ-free mice that were fed a Malawian diet revealed that immature microbiota from undernourished infants and children transmit impaired growth phenotypes. The representation of several age-discriminatory taxa in recipient animals correlated with lean body mass gain; liver, muscle, and brain metabolism; and bone morphology. Mice were cohoused shortly after receiving microbiota from healthy or severely stunted and underweight infants; age- and growth-discriminatory taxa from the microbiota of the former were able to invade that of the latter, which prevented growth impairments in recipient animals. Adding two invasive species, Ruminococcus gnavus and Clostridium symbiosum, to the microbiota from undernourished donors also ameliorated growth and metabolic abnormalities in recipient animals. These results provide evidence that microbiota immaturity is causally related to undernutrition and reveal potential therapeutic targets and agents.


#17 Nrf2/Keap1 Pathway and Expression of Oxidative Stress Lesions 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and Nitrotyrosine in Melanoma PDF logo

Hintsala H; Jokinen E; Haapasaari K; Moza M; Ristimäki A; Soini Y; Koivunen J; Karihtala P

Genes to Cells Volume 16, Issue 2, Pages 123–140

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The Keap1–Nrf2 regulatory pathway plays a central role in the protection of cells against oxidative and xenobiotic damage. Under unstressed conditions, Nrf2 is constantly ubiquitinated by the Cul3–Keap1 ubiquitin E3 ligase complex and rapidly degraded in proteasomes. Upon exposure to electrophilic and oxidative stresses, reactive cysteine residues of Keap1 become modified, leading to a decline in the E3 ligase activity, stabilization of Nrf2 and robust induction of a battery of cytoprotective genes. Biochemical and structural analyses have revealed that the intact Keap1 homodimer forms a cherry-bob structure in which one molecule of Nrf2 associates with two molecules of Keap1 by using two binding sites within the Neh2 domain of Nrf2. This two-site binding appears critical for Nrf2 ubiquitination. In many human cancers, missense mutations in KEAP1 and NRF2 genes have been identified. These mutations disrupt the Keap1–Nrf2 complex activity involved in ubiquitination and degradation of Nrf2 and result in constitutive activation of Nrf2. Elevated expression of Nrf2 target genes confers advantages in terms of stress resistance and cell proliferation in normal and cancer cells. Discovery and development of selective Nrf2 inhibitors should make a critical contribution to improved cancer therapy.


#18 Integrative approaches for large-scale transcriptome-wide association studies Link logo

Gusev Alexander; Ko Arthur; Shi Huwenbo; Bhatia Gaurav; Chung Wonil; Penninx Brenda W; Jansen Rick; de Geus Eco J; Boomsma Dorret; Wright Fred A; Sullivan Patrick F; Nikkola Elina; Alvarez Marcus; Civelek Mete; Lusis Aldons J; Lehtimäki Terho; Raitoharju Emma; Kähönen Mika; Seppälä Ilkka; Raitakari Olli T; Kuusisto Johanna; Laakso Markku; Price Alkes L; Pajukanta Päivi; Pasaniuc Bogdan

Nature Genetics

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Many genetic variants influence complex traits by modulating gene expression, thus altering the abundance of one or multiple proteins. Here we introduce a powerful strategy that integrates gene expression measurements with summary association statistics from large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify genes whose cis-regulated expression is associated with complex traits. We leverage expression imputation from genetic data to perform a transcriptome-wide association study (TWAS) to identify significant expression-trait associations. We applied our approaches to expression data from blood and adipose tissue measured in ∼3,000 individuals overall. We imputed gene expression into GWAS data from over 900,000 phenotype measurements to identify 69 new genes significantly associated with obesity-related traits (BMI, lipids and height). Many of these genes are associated with relevant phenotypes in the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel. Our results showcase the power of integrating genotype, gene expression and phenotype to gain insights into the genetic basis of complex traits.


#19 The Simons Genome Diversity Project:300 genomes from 142 diverse populations Link logo

Mallick, Swapan; Li, Heng; Lipson, Mark; Mathieson, Iain; Gymrek, Melissa; Racimo, Fernando; Zhao, Mengyao; Chennagiri, Niru; Nordenfelt, Susanne; Tandon, Arti; Skoglund, Pontus; Lazaridis, Iosif; Sankararaman, Sriram; Fu, Qiaomei; Rohland, Nadin; Renaud, Gabriel; Erlich, Yaniv; Willems, Thomas; Gallo, Carla; Spence, Jeffrey P.

Nature Volume 538, Issue 7624, Pages 201–206

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Here we report the Simons Genome Diversity Project data set: high quality genomes from 300 individuals from 142 diverse populations. These genomes include at least 5.8 million base pairs that are not present in the human reference genome. Our analysis reveals key features of the landscape of human genome variation, including that the rate of accumulation of mutations has accelerated by about 5% in non-Africans compared to Africans since divergence. We show that the ancestors of some pairs of present-day human populations were substantially separated by 100,000 years ago, well before the archaeologically attested onset of behavioural modernity. We also demonstrate that indigenous Australians, New Guineans and Andamanese do not derive substantial ancestry from an early dispersal of modern humans; instead, their modern human ancestry is consistent with coming from the same source as that of other non-Africans.


#20 Sialylated Milk Oligosaccharides Promote Microbiota-Dependent Growth in Models of Infant Undernutrition Link logo PDF logo

Charbonneau Mark R; O'Donnell David; Blanton Laura V; Totten Sarah M; Davis Jarmine C; Barratt Michael J; Cheng Jiye; Guruge Janaki; Talcott Michael; Bain James R; Muehlbauer Michael J; Ilkayeva Olga; Wu Chao; Struckmeyer Tedd; Barile Daniela; Mangani Charles; Jorgensen Josh; Fan Yue-Mei; Maleta Kenneth; Dewey Kathryn G; Ashorn Per; Newgard Christopher B; Lebrilla Carlito; Mills David A; Gordon Jeffrey I

Cell Volume 164, Issue 5, Pages 859–871

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Identifying interventions that more effectively promote healthy growth of children with undernutrition is a pressing global health goal. Analysis of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) from 6-month-postpartum mothers in two Malawian birth cohorts revealed that sialylated HMOs are significantly less abundant in those with severely stunted infants. To explore this association, we colonized young germ-free mice with a consortium of bacterial strains cultured from the fecal microbiota of a 6-month-old stunted Malawian infant and fed recipient animals a prototypic Malawian diet with or without purified sialylated bovine milk oligosaccharides (S-BMO). S-BMO produced a microbiota-dependent augmentation of lean body mass gain, changed bone morphology, and altered liver, muscle, and brain metabolism in ways indicative of a greater ability to utilize nutrients for anabolism. These effects were also documented in gnotobiotic piglets using the same consortium and Malawian diet. These preclinical models indicate a causal, microbiota-dependent relationship between S-BMO and growth promotion. PAPERCLIP.


#21 Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment Link logo

Okbay; Aysu; Beauchamp; Jonathan P.; Fontana; Mark Alan; Lee; James J.; Pers; Tune H.; Rietveld; Cornelius A.; Turley; Patrick; Chen; Guo-Bo; Emilsson; Valur; Meddens; S. Fleur W.; Oskarsson; Sven; Pickrell; Joseph K.; Thom; Kevin; Timshel; Pascal; de Vlaming; Ronald; Abdellaoui; Abdel; Ahluwalia; Tarunveer S.; Bacelis; Jonas; Baumbach; Clemens; Bjornsdottir; Gyda; Brandsma; Johannes H.; Concas; Maria Pina; Derringer; Jaime; Furlotte; Nicholas A.; Galesloot; Tessel E.; Girotto; Giorgia; Gupta; R

Nature Volume 533, Issue 7604, Pages 539–542

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Educational attainment is strongly influenced by social and other environmental factors, but genetic factors are estimated to account for at least 20% of the variation across individuals. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for educational attainment that extends our earlier discovery sample of 101,069 individuals to 293,723 individuals, and a replication study in an independent sample of 111,349 individuals from the UK Biobank. We identify 74 genome-wide significant loci associated with the number of years of schooling completed. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with educational attainment are disproportionately found in genomic regions regulating gene expression in the fetal brain. Candidate genes are preferentially expressed in neural tissue, especially during the prenatal period, and enriched for biological pathways involved in neural development. Our findings demonstrate that, even for a behavioural phenotype that is mostly environmentally determined, a well-powered GWAS identifies replicable associated genetic variants that suggest biologically relevant pathways. Because educational attainment is measured in large numbers of individuals, it will continue to be useful as a proxy phenotype in efforts to characterize the genetic influences of related phenotypes, including cognition and neuropsychiatric diseases.


#22 Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses Link logo

Okbay; Aysu; Baselmans; Bart M. L.; De Neve; Jan-Emmanuel; Turley; Patrick; Nivard; Michel G.; Fontana; Mark Alan; Meddens; S. Fleur W.; Linner; Richard Karlsson; Rietveld; Cornelius A.; Derringer; Jaime; Gratten; Jacob; Lee; James J.; Liu; Jimmy Z.; de Vlaming; Ronald; Ahluwalia; Tarunveer S.; Buchwald; Jadwiga; Cavadino; Alana; Frazier-Wood; Alexis C.; Furlotte; Nicholas A.; Garfield; Victoria; Geisel; Marie Henrike; Gonzalez; Juan R.; Haitjema; Saskia; Karlsson; Robert; van der Laan; Sander W

Nature Genetics Volume 48, Issue 6, Pages 624–633

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Very few genetic variants have been associated with depression and neuroticism, likely because of limitations on sample size in previous studies. Subjective well-being, a phenotype that is genetically correlated with both of these traits, has not yet been studied with genome-wide data. We conducted genome-wide association studies of three phenotypes: subjective well-being (n = 298,420), depressive symptoms (n = 161,460), and neuroticism (n = 170,911). We identify 3 variants associated with subjective well-being, 2 variants associated with depressive symptoms, and 11 variants associated with neuroticism, including 2 inversion polymorphisms. The two loci associated with depressive symptoms replicate in an independent depression sample. Joint analyses that exploit the high genetic correlations between the phenotypes (|ρ^| ≈ 0.8) strengthen the overall credibility of the findings and allow us to identify additional variants. Across our phenotypes, loci regulating expression in central nervous system and adrenal or pancreas tissues are strongly enriched for association.


#23 The role of enhancers in cancer Link logo

Sur, Inderpreet; Taipale, Jussi

Nature Reviews Cancer Volume 16, Issue 8, Pages 483–493

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Enhancer elements function as the logic gates of the genetic regulatory circuitry. One of their most important functions is the integration of extracellular signals with intracellular cell fate information to generate cell type-specific transcriptional responses. Mutations occurring in cancer often misregulate enhancers that normally control the signal-dependent expression of growth-related genes. This misregulation can result from trans-acting mechanisms, such as activation of the transcription factors or epigenetic regulators that control enhancer activity, or can be caused in cis by direct mutations that alter the activity of the enhancer or its target gene specificity. These processes can generate tumour type-specific super-enhancers and establish a 'locked' gene regulatory state that drives the uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells. Here, we review the role of enhancers in cancer, and their potential as therapeutic targets.


#24 Estimates of global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and mortality of HIV, 1980-2015:the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015 Link logo PDF logo

Wang, Haidong; Wolock, Tim M.; Carter, Austin; Nguyen, Grant; Kyu, Hmwe Hmwe; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Hay, Simon I.; Mills, Edward J.; Trickey, Adam; Msemburi, William; Coates, Matthew M.; Mooney, Meghan D.; Fraser, Maya S.; Sligar, Amber; Salomon, Joshua; Larson, Heidi J.; Friedman, Joseph; Abajobir, Amanuel Alemu; Abate, Kalkidan Hassen; Abbas, Kaja M.

The Lancet HIV Volume 3, Issue 8, Pages e361–e387

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Timely assessment of the burden of HIV/AIDS is essential for policy setting and programme evaluation. In this report from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015 (GBD 2015), we provide national estimates of levels and trends of HIV/AIDS incidence, prevalence, coverage of antiretroviral therapy (ART), and mortality for 195 countries and territories from 1980 to 2015. For countries without high-quality vital registration data, we estimated prevalence and incidence with data from antenatal care clinics and population-based seroprevalence surveys, and with assumptions by age and sex on initial CD4 distribution at infection, CD4 progression rates (probability of progression from higher to lower CD4 cell-count category), on and off antiretroviral therapy (ART) mortality, and mortality from all other causes. Our estimation strategy links the GBD 2015 assessment of all-cause mortality and estimation of incidence and prevalence so that for each draw from the uncertainty distribution all assumptions used in each step are internally consistent. We estimated incidence, prevalence, and death with GBD versions of the Estimation and Projection Package (EPP) and Spectrum software originally developed by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). We used an open-source version of EPP and recoded Spectrum for speed, and used updated assumptions from systematic reviews of the literature and GBD demographic data. For countries with high-quality vital registration data, we developed the cohort incidence bias adjustment model to estimate HIV incidence and prevalence largely from the number of deaths caused by HIV recorded in cause-of-death statistics. We corrected these statistics for garbage coding and HIV misclassification. Global HIV incidence reached its peak in 1997, at 3·3 million new infections (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 3·1-3·4 million). Annual incidence has stayed relatively constant at about 2·6 million per year (range 2·5-2·8 million) since 2005, after a period of fast decline between 1997 and 2005. The number of people living with HIV/AIDS has been steadily increasing and reached 38·8 million (95% UI 37·6-40·4 million) in 2015. At the same time, HIV/AIDS mortality has been declining at a steady pace, from a peak of 1·8 million deaths (95% UI 1·7-1·9 million) in 2005, to 1·2 million deaths (1·1-1·3 million) in 2015. We recorded substantial heterogeneity in the levels and trends of HIV/AIDS across countries. Although many countries have experienced decreases in HIV/AIDS mortality and in annual new infections, other countries have had slowdowns or increases in rates of change in annual new infections. Scale-up of ART and prevention of mother-to-child transmission has been one of the great successes of global health in the past two decades. However, in the past decade, progress in reducing new infections has been slow, development assistance for health devoted to HIV has stagnated, and resources for health in low-income countries have grown slowly. Achievement of the new ambitious goals for HIV enshrined in Sustainable Development Goal 3 and the 90-90-90 UNAIDS targets will be challenging, and will need continued efforts from governments and international agencies in the next 15 years to end AIDS by 2030. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and National Institute of Mental Health and National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health.


#25 Immunological Reconstitution in Children After Completing Conventional Chemotherapy of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia is Marked by Impaired B-cell Compartment

Koskenvuo M; Ekman I; Saha E; Salokannel E; Matomäki J; Ilonen J; Kainulainen L; Arola M; Lähteenmäki PM

Pediatric Blood and Cancer

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Humoral and cellular immunity were studied in 28 children completing conventional treatment of standard-risk (SR) or intermediate-risk (IR) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Both naïve and memory B cells were most severely affected and showed slow recovery during the 2-year follow-up, while the T-cell compartment showed only minor changes. Immunoglobulins and IgG subclasses, components, and antibodies against vaccine-preventable diseases were not significantly affected. In conclusion, immune recovery after conventional chemotherapy for SR and IR ALL is marked by B-cell depletion, but otherwise did not show any severe deficiencies in lymphocyte function.


#26 ESMO consensus guidelines for the management of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer Link logo PDF logo

Van Cutsem, E.; Cervantes, A.; Adam, R.; Sobrero, A.; Van Krieken, J. H.; Aderka, D.; Aranda Aguilar, E.; Bardelli, A.; Benson, A.; Bodoky, G.; Ciardiello, F.; D'Hoore, A.; Diaz-Rubio, E.; Douillard, J. -Y.; Ducreux, M.; Falcone, A.; Grothey, A.; Gruenberger, T.; Haustermans, K.; Heinemann, V.

Annals of Oncology Volume 27, Issue 8, Pages mdw235–1422

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Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in Western countries. Over the last 20 years, and the last decade in particular, the clinical outcome for patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) has improved greatly due not only to an increase in the number of patients being referred for and undergoing surgical resection of their localised metastatic disease but also to a more strategic approach to the delivery of systemic therapy and an expansion in the use of ablative techniques. This reflects the increase in the number of patients that are being managed within a multidisciplinary team environment and specialist cancer centres, and the emergence over the same time period not only of improved imaging techniques but also prognostic and predictive molecular markers. Treatment decisions for patients with mCRC must be evidence-based. Thus, these ESMO consensus guidelines have been developed based on the current available evidence to provide a series of evidence-based recommendations to assist in the treatment and management of patients with mCRC in this rapidly evolving treatment setting.


#27 Assisted reproductive technology in Europe, 2012:results generated from European registers by ESHREaEuro Link logo PDF logo

Calhaz-Jorge, C.; de Geyter, C.; Kupka, M. S.; de Mouzon, J.; Erb, K.; Mocanu, E.; Motrenko, T.; Scaravelli, G.; Wyns, C.; Goossens, V.; Gliozheni, Orion; Strohmer, Heinz; Petrovskaya, Elena; Tishkevich, Oleg; Wyns, Christine; Bogaerts, Kris; Antonova, Irena; Vrcic, Hrvoje; Ljiljak, Dejan; Rezabek, Karel

Human Reproduction Volume 31, Issue 8, Pages 1638–1652

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The 16th European IVF-monitoring (EIM) report presents the data of the treatments involving assisted reproductive technology (ART) and intrauterine insemination (IUI) initiated in Europe during 2012: are there any changes compared with previous years? Despite some fluctuations in the number of countries reporting data, the overall number of ART cycles has continued to increase year by year, the pregnancy rates (PRs) in 2012 remained stable compared with those reported in 2011, and the number of transfers with multiple embryos (3+) and the multiple delivery rates were lower than ever before. Since 1997, ART data in Europe have been collected and re-ported in 15 manuscripts, published in Human Reproduction. Retrospective data collection of European ART data by the EIM Consortium for the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE). Data for cycles between 1 January and 31 December 2012 were collected from National Registers, when existing, or on a voluntary basis by personal information. From 34 countries (+1 compared with 2011), 1111 clinics reported 640 144 treatment cycles including 139 978 of IVF, 312 600 of ICSI, 139 558 of frozen embryo replacement (FER), 33 605 of egg donation (ED), 421 of in vitro maturation, 8433 of preimplantation genetic diagnosis/preimplantation genetic screening and 5549 of frozen oocyte replacements (FOR). European data on intrauterine insemination using husband/partner's semen (IUI-H) and donor semen (IUI-D) were reported from 1126 IUI labs in 24 countries. A total of 175 028 IUI-H and 43 497 IUI-D cycles were included. In 18 countries where all clinics reported to their ART register, a total of 369 081 ART cycles were performed in a population of around 295 million inhabitants, corresponding to 1252 cycles per million inhabitants (range 325-2732 cycles per million inhabitants). For all IVF cycles, the clinical PRs per aspiration and per transfer were stable with 29.4 (29.1% in 2011) and 33.8% (33.2% in 2011), respectively. For ICSI, the corresponding rates also were stable with 27.8 (27.9% in 2011) and 32.3% (31.8% in 2011). In FER cycles, the PR per thawing/warming increased to 23.1% (21.3% in 2011). In ED cycles, the PR per fresh transfer increased to 48.4% (45.8% in 2011) and to 35.9% (33.6% in 2011) per thawed transfer, while it was 45.1% for transfers after FOR. The delivery rate after IUI remained stable, at 8.5% (8.3% in 2011) after IUI-H and 12.0% (12.2% in 2011) after IUI-D. In IVF and ICSI cycles, 1, 2, 3 and 4+ embryos were transferred in 30.2, 55.4, 13.3 and 1.1% of the cycles, respectively. The proportions of singleton, twin and triplet deliveries after IVF and ICSI (added together) were 82.1, 17.3 and 0.6%, respectively, resulting in a total multiple delivery rate of 17.9% compared with 19.2% in 2011 and 20.6% in 2010. In FER cycles, the multiple delivery rate was 12.5% (12.2% twins and 0.3% triplets). Twin and triplet delivery rates associated with IUI cycles were 9.0%/0.4% and 7.2%/0.5%, following treatment with husband and donor semen, respectively. The method of reporting varies among countries, and registers from a number of countries have been unable to provide some of the relevant data such as initiated cycles and deliveries. As long as data are incomplete and generated through different methods of collection, results should be interpreted with caution. The 16th ESHRE report on ART shows a continuing expansion of the number of treatment cycles in Europe, with more than 640 000 cycles reported in 2012 with an increasing contribution to birthrate in many countries. However, the need to improve and standardize the national registries, and to establish validation methodologies remains manifest. The study has no external funding; all costs are covered by ESHRE. There are no competing interests.


#28 Durable coexistence of donor and recipient strains after fecal microbiota transplantation Link logo PDF logo

Li, Simone S.; Zhu, Ana; Benes, Vladimir; Costea, Paul I.; Hercog, Rajna; Hildebrand, Falk; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Nieuwdorp, Max; Salojarvi, Jarkko; Voigt, Anita Y.; Zeller, Georg; Sunagawa, Shinichi; de Vos, Willem M.; Bork, Peer

Science Volume 352, Issue 6285, Pages 586–589

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Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has shown efficacy in treating recurrent Clostridium difficile infection and is increasingly being applied to other gastrointestinal disorders, yet the fate of native and introduced microbial strains remains largely unknown. To quantify the extent of donor microbiota colonization, we monitored strain populations in fecal samples from a recent FMT study on metabolic syndrome patients using single-nucleotide variants in metagenomes. We found extensive coexistence of donor and recipient strains, persisting 3 months after treatment. Colonization success was greater for conspecific strains than for new species, the latter falling within fluctuation levels observed in healthy individuals over a similar time frame. Furthermore, same-donor recipients displayed varying degrees of microbiota transfer, indicating individual patterns of microbiome resistance and donor-recipient compatibilities.


#29 Childhood Infections, Socioeconomic Status, and Adult Cardiometabolic Risk PDF logo

Liu RS.; Burgner DP.; Sabin MA.; Magnussen CG.; Cheung M; Hutri-Kahonen N; Kahonen M; Lehtimaki T; Jokinen E; Laitinen T; Taittonen L; Dwyer T; Viikari JS.; Kivimaki M; Raitakari OT.; Juonala M

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences Volume 1186, Issue 1, Pages 37–55

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#30 Global and National Burden of Diseases and Injuries Among Children and Adolescents Between 1990 and 2013 Findings From the Global Burden of Disease 2013 Study Link logo PDF logo

Kyu; Hmwe H.; Pinho; Christine; Wagner; Joseph A.; Brown; Jonathan C.; Bertozzi-Villa; Amelia; Charlson; Fiona J.; Coffeng; Luc Edgar; Dandona; Lalit; Erskine; Holly E.; Ferrari; Alize J.; Fitzmaurice; Christina; Fleming; Thomas D.; Forouzanfar; Mohammad H.; Graetz; Nicholas; Guinovart; Caterina; Haagsma; Juanita; Higashi; Hideki; Kassebaum; Nicholas J.; Larson; Heidi J.; Lim; Stephen S.; Mokdad; Ali H.; Moradi-Lakeh; Maziar; Odell; Shaun V.; Roth; Gregory A.; Serina; Peter T.; Stanaway; Jeffrey

JAMA Pediatrics Volume 170, Issue 3

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The literature focuses on mortality among children younger than 5 years. Comparable information on nonfatal health outcomes among these children and the fatal and nonfatal burden of diseases and injuries among older children and adolescents is scarce. To determine levels and trends in the fatal and nonfatal burden of diseases and injuries among younger children (aged <5 years), older children (aged 5-9 years), and adolescents (aged 10-19 years) between 1990 and 2013 in 188 countries from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2013 study. Data from vital registration, verbal autopsy studies, maternal and child death surveillance, and other sources covering 14 244 site-years (ie, years of cause of death data by geography) from 1980 through 2013 were used to estimate cause-specific mortality. Data from 35 620 epidemiological sources were used to estimate the prevalence of the diseases and sequelae in the GBD 2013 study. Cause-specific mortality for most causes was estimated using the Cause of Death Ensemble Model strategy. For some infectious diseases (eg, HIV infection/AIDS, measles, hepatitis B) where the disease process is complex or the cause of death data were insufficient or unavailable, we used natural history models. For most nonfatal health outcomes, DisMod-MR 2.0, a Bayesian metaregression tool, was used to meta-analyze the epidemiological data to generate prevalence estimates. Of the 7.7 (95% uncertainty interval [UI], 7.4-8.1) million deaths among children and adolescents globally in 2013, 6.28 million occurred among younger children, 0.48 million among older children, and 0.97 million among adolescents. In 2013, the leading causes of death were lower respiratory tract infections among younger children (905 059 deaths; 95% UI, 810 304-998 125), diarrheal diseases among older children (38 325 deaths; 95% UI, 30 365-47 678), and road injuries among adolescents (115 186 deaths; 95% UI, 105 185-124 870). Iron deficiency anemia was the leading cause of years lived with disability among children and adolescents, affecting 619 (95% UI, 618-621) million in 2013. Large between-country variations exist in mortality from leading causes among children and adolescents. Countries with rapid declines in all-cause mortality between 1990 and 2013 also experienced large declines in most leading causes of death, whereas countries with the slowest declines had stagnant or increasing trends in the leading causes of death. In 2013, Nigeria had a 12% global share of deaths from lower respiratory tract infections and a 38% global share of deaths from malaria. India had 33% of the world's deaths from neonatal encephalopathy. Half of the world's diarrheal deaths among children and adolescents occurred in just 5 countries: India, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Pakistan, Nigeria, and Ethiopia. Understanding the levels and trends of the leading causes of death and disability among children and adolescents is critical to guide investment and inform policies. Monitoring these trends over time is also key to understanding where interventions are having an impact. Proven interventions exist to prevent or treat the leading causes of unnecessary death and disability among children and adolescents. The findings presented here show that these are underused and give guidance to policy makers in countries where more attention is needed.


#31 Trends in adult body-mass index in 200 countries from 1975 to 2014: a pooled analysis of 1698 population-based measurement studies with 19.2 million participants Link logo PDF logo

Di Cesare; Mariachiara; Bentham; James; Stevens; Gretchen A.; Zhou; Bin; Danaei; Goodarz; Lu; Yuan; Bixby; Honor; Cowan; Melanie J.; Riley; Leanne M.; Hajifathalian; Kaveh; Fortunato; Lea; Taddei; Cristina; Bennett; James E.; Ikeda; Nayu; Khang; Young-Ho; Kyobutungi; Catherine; Laxmaiah; Avula; Li; Yanping; Lin; Hsien-Ho; Miranda; J. Jaime; Mostafa; Aya; Turley; Maria L.; Paciorek; Christopher J.; Gunter; Marc; Ezzati; Majid; Abdeen; Ziad A.; Hamid; Zargar Abdul; Abu-Rmeileh; Niveen M.; Acosta-C

The Lancet Volume 387, Issue 10026, Pages 1377–1396

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Underweight and severe and morbid obesity are associated with highly elevated risks of adverse health outcomes. We estimated trends in mean body-mass index (BMI), which characterises its population distribution, and in the prevalences of a complete set of BMI categories for adults in all countries. We analysed, with use of a consistent protocol, population-based studies that had measured height and weight in adults aged 18 years and older. We applied a Bayesian hierarchical model to these data to estimate trends from 1975 to 2014 in mean BMI and in the prevalences of BMI categories (<18·5 kg/m(2) [underweight], 18·5 kg/m(2) to <20 kg/m(2), 20 kg/m(2) to <25 kg/m(2), 25 kg/m(2) to <30 kg/m(2), 30 kg/m(2) to <35 kg/m(2), 35 kg/m(2) to <40 kg/m(2), ≥40 kg/m(2) [morbid obesity]), by sex in 200 countries and territories, organised in 21 regions. We calculated the posterior probability of meeting the target of halting by 2025 the rise in obesity at its 2010 levels, if post-2000 trends continue. We used 1698 population-based data sources, with more than 19·2 million adult participants (9·9 million men and 9·3 million women) in 186 of 200 countries for which estimates were made. Global age-standardised mean BMI increased from 21·7 kg/m(2) (95% credible interval 21·3-22·1) in 1975 to 24·2 kg/m(2) (24·0-24·4) in 2014 in men, and from 22·1 kg/m(2) (21·7-22·5) in 1975 to 24·4 kg/m(2) (24·2-24·6) in 2014 in women. Regional mean BMIs in 2014 for men ranged from 21·4 kg/m(2) in central Africa and south Asia to 29·2 kg/m(2) (28·6-29·8) in Polynesia and Micronesia; for women the range was from 21·8 kg/m(2) (21·4-22·3) in south Asia to 32·2 kg/m(2) (31·5-32·8) in Polynesia and Micronesia. Over these four decades, age-standardised global prevalence of underweight decreased from 13·8% (10·5-17·4) to 8·8% (7·4-10·3) in men and from 14·6% (11·6-17·9) to 9·7% (8·3-11·1) in women. South Asia had the highest prevalence of underweight in 2014, 23·4% (17·8-29·2) in men and 24·0% (18·9-29·3) in women. Age-standardised prevalence of obesity increased from 3·2% (2·4-4·1) in 1975 to 10·8% (9·7-12·0) in 2014 in men, and from 6·4% (5·1-7·8) to 14·9% (13·6-16·1) in women. 2·3% (2·0-2·7) of the world's men and 5·0% (4·4-5·6) of women were severely obese (ie, have BMI ≥35 kg/m(2)). Globally, prevalence of morbid obesity was 0·64% (0·46-0·86) in men and 1·6% (1·3-1·9) in women. If post-2000 trends continue, the probability of meeting the global obesity target is virtually zero. Rather, if these trends continue, by 2025, global obesity prevalence will reach 18% in men and surpass 21% in women; severe obesity will surpass 6% in men and 9% in women. Nonetheless, underweight remains prevalent in the world's poorest regions, especially in south Asia. Wellcome Trust, Grand Challenges Canada.


#32 Human gut colonisation may be initiated in utero by distinct microbial communities in the placenta and amniotic fluid

Collado MC; Rautava S; Aakko J; Isolauri E; Salminen S

Scientific Reports

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Interaction with intestinal microbes in infancy has a profound impact on health and disease in later life through programming of immune and metabolic pathways. We collected maternal faeces, placenta, amniotic fluid, colostrum, meconium and infant faeces samples from 15 mother-infant pairs in an effort to rigorously investigate prenatal and neonatal microbial transfer and gut colonisation. To ensure sterile sampling, only deliveries at full term by elective caesarean section were studied. Microbiota composition and activity assessment by conventional bacterial culture, 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, quantitative PCR, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that the placenta and amniotic fluid harbour a distinct microbiota characterised by low richness, low diversity and the predominance of Proteobacteria. Shared features between the microbiota detected in the placenta and amniotic fluid and in infant meconium suggest microbial transfer at the foeto-maternal interface. At the age of 3-4 days, the infant gut microbiota composition begins to resemble that detected in colostrum. Based on these data, we propose that the stepwise microbial gut colonisation process may be initiated already prenatally by a distinct microbiota in the placenta and amniotic fluid. The link between the mother and the offspring is continued after birth by microbes present in breast milk.


#33 Screening out irrelevant cell-based models of disease Link logo

Horvath, Peter; Aulner, Nathalie; Bickle, Marc; Davies, Anthony M.; Del Nery, Elaine; Ebner, Daniel; Montoya, Maria C.; Ostling, Paivi; Pietiainen, Vilja; Price, Leo S.; Shorte, Spencer L.; Turcatti, Gerardo; von Schantz, Carina; Carragher, Neil O.

Nature Reviews Drug Discovery Volume 15, Issue 11, Pages 751–769

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The common and persistent failures to translate promising preclinical drug candidates into clinical success highlight the limited effectiveness of disease models currently used in drug discovery. An apparent reluctance to explore and adopt alternative cell- and tissue-based model systems, coupled with a detachment from clinical practice during assay validation, contributes to ineffective translational research. To help address these issues and stimulate debate, here we propose a set of principles to facilitate the definition and development of disease-relevant assays, and we discuss new opportunities for exploiting the latest advances in cell-based assay technologies in drug discovery, including induced pluripotent stem cells, three-dimensional (3D) co-culture and organ-on-a-chip systems, complemented by advances in single-cell imaging and gene editing technologies. Funding to support precompetitive, multidisciplinary collaborations to develop novel preclinical models and cell-based screening technologies could have a key role in improving their clinical relevance, and ultimately increase clinical success rates.


#34 No clinical utility of KRAS variant rs61764370 for ovarian or breast cancer Link logo

Hollestelle, Antoinette; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Berchuck, Andrew; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Aben, Katja K.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Alducci, Elisa; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Apicella, Carmel; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Ashworth, Alan; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary

Gynecologic Oncology Volume 141, Issue 2, Pages 386–401

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. Clinical genetic testing is commercially available for rs61764370, an inherited variant residing in a KRAS 3' UTR microRNA binding site, based on suggested associations with increased ovarian and breast cancer risk as well as with survival time. However, prior studies, emphasizing particular subgroups, were relatively small. Therefore, we comprehensively evaluated ovarian and breast cancer risks as well as clinical outcome associated with rs61764370. . Centralized genotyping and analysis was performed for 140,012 women enrolled in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (15,357 ovarian cancer patients; 30,816 controls), the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (33,530 breast cancer patients; 37,640 controls), and the Consortium of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (14,765 BRCA1 and 7,904 BRCA2 mutation carriers). . We found no association with risk of ovarian cancer (OR=0.99, 95% CI 0.94-1.04, p=0.74) or breast cancer (OR=0.98, 95% CI 0.94-1.01, p=0.19) and results were consistent among mutation carriers (BRCA1, ovarian cancer HR=1.09, 95% CI 0.97-1.23, p=0.14, breast cancer HR=1.04, 95% CI 0.97-1.12, p=0.27; BRCA2, ovarian cancer HR=0.89, 95% CI 0.71-1.13, p=0.34, breast cancer HR=1.06, 95% CI 0.94-1.19, p=0.35). Null results were also obtained for associations with overall survival following ovarian cancer (HR=0.94, 95% CI 0.83-1.07, p=0.38), breast cancer (HR=0.96, 95% CI 0.87-1.06, p=0.38), and all other previously-reported associations. . rs61764370 is not associated with risk of ovarian or breast cancer nor with clinical outcome for patients with these cancers. Therefore, genotyping this variant has no clinical utility related to the prediction or management of these cancers.


#35 Healthy human gut phageome Link logo PDF logo

Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T.; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M.; Young, Mark J.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Volume 113, Issue 37, Pages 201601060–10405

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The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of humans, we analyzed a deep DNA sequence dataset of active bacteriophages and available metagenomic datasets of the gut bacteriophage community from healthy individuals. We found 23 shared bacteriophages in more than one-half of 64 healthy individuals from around the world. These shared bacteriophages were found in a significantly smaller percentage of individuals with gastrointestinal/irritable bowel disease. A network analysis identified 44 bacteriophage groups of which 9 (20%) were shared in more than one-half of all 64 individuals. These results provide strong evidence of a healthy gut phageome (HGP) in humans. The bacteriophage community in the human gut is a mixture of three classes: a set of core bacteriophages shared among more than one-half of all people, a common set of bacteriophages found in 20-50% of individuals, and a set of bacteriophages that are either rarely shared or unique to a person. We propose that the core and common bacteriophage communities are globally distributed and comprise the HGP, which plays an important role in maintaining gut microbiome structure/function and thereby contributes significantly to human health.


#36 Executive summary. Expert consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric pulmonary hypertension. The European Paediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Network, endorsed by ISHLT and DGPK Link logo

Hansmann, Georg; Apitz, Christian; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Beerbaum, Phillip; Bonnet, Damien; Dubowy, Karl-Otto; Gorenflo, Matthias; Hager, Alfred; Hilgendorff, Anne; Kaestner, Michael; Koestenberger, Martin; Koskenvuo, Juha W.; Kozlik-Feldmann, Rainer; Kuehne, Titus; Lammers, Astrid E.; Latus, Heiner; Michel-Behnke, Ina; Miera, Oliver; Moledina, Shahin

Heart Volume 102 Suppl 2, Issue Suppl 2, Pages ii86–ii100

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: The European Paediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease (PVD) Network is a registered, non-profit organisation that strives to define and develop effective, innovative diagnostic methods and treatment options in all forms of paediatric pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease, including specific forms such as pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)-congenital heart disease, pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, persistent PH of the newborn, and related cardiac dysfunction. The writing group members conducted searches of the PubMed/MEDLINE bibliographic database (1990-2015) and held five face-to-face meetings with votings. Clinical trials, guidelines, and reviews limited to paediatric data were searched using the terms 'pulmonary hypertensioń' and 5-10 other keywords, as outlined in the other nine articles of this special issue. Class of recommendation (COR) and level of evidence (LOE) were assigned based on European Society of Cardiology/American Heart Association definitions and on paediatric data only, or on adult studies that included >10% children. A total of 9 original consensus articles with graded recommendations (COR/LOE) were developed, and are summarised here. The topics included diagnosis/monitoring, genetics/biomarker, cardiac catheterisation, echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance/chest CT, associated forms of PH, intensive care unit/ventricular assist device/lung transplantation, and treatment of paediatric PAH. The multipaper expert consensus statement of the European Paediatric PVD Network provides a specific, comprehensive, detailed but practical framework for the optimal clinical care of children with PH.


#37 Proteomic maps of breast cancer subtypes

Tyanova S; Albrechtsen R; Kronqvist P; Cox J; Mann M; Geiger T

Nature Communications

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Systems-wide profiling of breast cancer has almost always entailed RNA and DNA analysis by microarray and sequencing techniques. Marked developments in proteomic technologies now enable very deep profiling of clinical samples, with high identification and quantification accuracy. We analysed 40 oestrogen receptor positive (luminal), Her2 positive and triple negative breast tumours and reached a quantitative depth of >10,000 proteins. These proteomic profiles identified functional differences between breast cancer subtypes, related to energy metabolism, cell growth, mRNA translation and cell-cell communication. Furthermore, we derived a signature of 19 proteins, which differ between the breast cancer subtypes, through support vector machine (SVM)-based classification and feature selection. Remarkably, only three proteins of the signature were associated with gene copy number variations and eleven were also reflected on the mRNA level. These breast cancer features revealed by our work provide novel insights that may ultimately translate to development of subtype-specific therapeutics.


#38 Genetic influences on schizophrenia and subcortical brain volumes:large-scale proof of concept Link logo

Franke, Barbara; Stein, Jason L.; Ripke, Stephan; Anttila, Verneri; Hibar, Derrek P.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Smoller, Jordan W.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Neale, Michael C.; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Lee, Phil; McMahon, Francis J.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mattheisen, Manuel; Andreassen, Ole A.; Gruber, Oliver; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Roiz-Santianez, Roberto; Saykin, Andrew J.

Nature Neuroscience Volume 19, Issue 3, Pages 420–431

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Schizophrenia is a devastating psychiatric illness with high heritability. Brain structure and function differ, on average, between people with schizophrenia and healthy individuals. As common genetic associations are emerging for both schizophrenia and brain imaging phenotypes, we can now use genome-wide data to investigate genetic overlap. Here we integrated results from common variant studies of schizophrenia (33,636 cases, 43,008 controls) and volumes of several (mainly subcortical) brain structures (11,840 subjects). We did not find evidence of genetic overlap between schizophrenia risk and subcortical volume measures either at the level of common variant genetic architecture or for single genetic markers. These results provide a proof of concept (albeit based on a limited set of structural brain measures) and define a roadmap for future studies investigating the genetic covariance between structural or functional brain phenotypes and risk for psychiatric disorders.


#39 Discrete Neural Signatures of Basic Emotions PDF logo

Saarimaki H, Gotsopoulos A, Jaaskelainen IP, Lampinen J, Vuilleumier P, Hari R, Sams M, Nummenmaa L

Cerebral Cortex Volume 26, Issue 6

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Categorical models of emotions posit neurally and physiologically distinct human basic emotions. We tested this assumption by using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) to classify brain activity patterns of 6 basic emotions (disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, anger, and surprise) in 3 experiments. Emotions were induced with short movies or mental imagery during functional magnetic resonance imaging. MVPA accurately classified emotions induced by both methods, and the classification generalized from one induction condition to another and across individuals. Brain regions contributing most to the classification accuracy included medial and inferior lateral prefrontal cortices, frontal pole, precentral and postcentral gyri, precuneus, and posterior cingulate cortex. Thus, specific neural signatures across these regions hold representations of different emotional states in multimodal fashion, independently of how the emotions are induced. Similarity of subjective experiences between emotions was associated with similarity of neural patterns for the same emotions, suggesting a direct link between activity in these brain regions and the subjective emotional experience.



#41 Genome-wide associations for birth weight and correlations with adult disease Link logo

Horikoshi, Momoko; Beaumont, Robin N.; Day, Felix R.; Warrington, Nicole M.; Kooijman, Marjolein N.; Fernandez-Tajes, Juan; Feenstra, Bjarke; van Zuydam, Natalie R.; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Grarup, Niels; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Strachan, David P.; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Kreiner, Eskil; Rueedi, Rico; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Cousminer, Diana L.; Wu, Ying; Thiering, Elisabeth

Nature Volume 538, Issue 7624, Pages 248–252

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Birth weight (BW) has been shown to be influenced by both fetal and maternal factors and in observational studies is reproducibly associated with future risk of adult metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease. These life-course associations have often been attributed to the impact of an adverse early life environment. Here, we performed a multi-ancestry genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of BW in 153,781 individuals, identifying 60 loci where fetal genotype was associated with BW (P < 5 × 10(-8)). Overall, approximately 15% of variance in BW was captured by assays of fetal genetic variation. Using genetic association alone, we found strong inverse genetic correlations between BW and systolic blood pressure (Rg = -0.22, P = 5.5 × 10(-13)), T2D (Rg = -0.27, P = 1.1 × 10(-6)) and coronary artery disease (Rg = -0.30, P = 6.5 × 10(-9)). In addition, using large -cohort datasets, we demonstrated that genetic factors were the major contributor to the negative covariance between BW and future cardiometabolic risk. Pathway analyses indicated that the protein products of genes within BW-associated regions were enriched for diverse processes including insulin signalling, glucose homeostasis, glycogen biosynthesis and chromatin remodelling. There was also enrichment of associations with BW in known imprinted regions (P = 1.9 × 10(-4)). We demonstrate that life-course associations between early growth phenotypes and adult cardiometabolic disease are in part the result of shared genetic effects and identify some of the pathways through which these causal genetic effects are mediated.


#42 Rare loss-of-function variants in SETD1A are associated with schizophrenia and developmental disorders Link logo

Singh, Tarjinder; Kurki, Mitja I.; Curtis, David; Purcell, Shaun M.; Crooks, Lucy; Mcrae, Jeremy; Suvisaari, Jaana; Chheda, Himanshu; Blackwood, Douglas; Breen, Gerome; Pietilainen, Olli; Gerety, Sebastian S.; Ayub, Muhammad; Blyth, Moira; Cole, Trevor; Collier, David; Coomber, Eve L.; Craddock, Nick; Daly, Mark J.; Danesh, John

Nature Neuroscience Volume 19, Issue 4, Pages 571–577

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By analyzing the whole-exome sequences of 4,264 schizophrenia cases, 9,343 controls and 1,077 trios, we identified a genome-wide significant association between rare loss-of-function (LoF) variants in SETD1A and risk for schizophrenia (P = 3.3 × 10(-9)). We found only two heterozygous LoF variants in 45,376 exomes from individuals without a neuropsychiatric diagnosis, indicating that SETD1A is substantially depleted of LoF variants in the general population. Seven of the ten individuals with schizophrenia carrying SETD1A LoF variants also had learning difficulties. We further identified four SETD1A LoF carriers among 4,281 children with severe developmental disorders and two more carriers in an independent sample of 5,720 Finnish exomes, both with notable neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Together, our observations indicate that LoF variants in SETD1A cause a range of neurodevelopmental disorders, including schizophrenia. Combining these data with previous common variant evidence, we suggest that epigenetic dysregulation, specifically in the histone H3K4 methylation pathway, is an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.


#43 Nivolumab alone and nivolumab plus ipilimumab in recurrent small-cell lung cancer (CheckMate 032):a multicentre, open-label, phase 1/2 trial Link logo PDF logo

Antonia, Scott J.; Lopez-Martin, Jose A.; Bendell, Johanna; Ott, Patrick A.; Taylor, Matthew; Eder, Joseph Paul; Jaeger, Dirk; Pietanza, M. Catherine; Le, Dung T.; de Braud, Filippo; Morse, Michael A.; Ascierto, Paolo A.; Horn, Leora; Amin, Asim; Pillai, Rathi N.; Evans, Jeffry; Chau, Ian; Bono, Petri; Atmaca, Akin; Sharma, Padmanee

Lancet Oncology Volume 17, Issue 7, Pages 883–895

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Treatments for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy are limited. We assessed safety and activity of nivolumab and nivolumab plus ipilimumab in patients with SCLC who progressed after one or more previous regimens. The SCLC cohort of this phase 1/2 multicentre, multi-arm, open-label trial was conducted at 23 sites (academic centres and hospitals) in six countries. Eligible patients were 18 years of age or older, had limited-stage or extensive-stage SCLC, and had disease progression after at least one previous platinum-containing regimen. Patients received nivolumab (3 mg/kg bodyweight intravenously) every 2 weeks (given until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity), or nivolumab plus ipilimumab (1 mg/kg plus 1 mg/kg, 1 mg/kg plus 3 mg/kg, or 3 mg/kg plus 1 mg/kg, intravenously) every 3 weeks for four cycles, followed by nivolumab 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Patients were either assigned to nivolumab monotherapy or assessed in a dose-escalating safety phase for the nivolumab/ipilimumab combination beginning at nivolumab 1 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 1 mg/kg. Depending on tolerability, patients were then assigned to nivolumab 1 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 3 mg/kg or nivolumab 3 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 1 mg/kg. The primary endpoint was objective response by investigator assessment. All analyses included patients who were enrolled at least 90 days before database lock. This trial is ongoing; here, we report an interim analysis of the SCLC cohort. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01928394. Between Nov 18, 2013, and July 28, 2015, 216 patients were enrolled and treated (98 with nivolumab 3 mg/kg, three with nivolumab 1 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 1 mg/kg, 61 with nivolumab 1 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 3 mg/kg, and 54 with nivolumab 3 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 1 mg/kg). At database lock on Nov 6, 2015, median follow-up for patients continuing in the study (including those who had died or discontinued treatment) was 198·5 days (IQR 163·0-464·0) for nivolumab 3 mg/kg, 302 days (IQR not calculable) for nivolumab 1 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 1 mg/kg, 361·0 days (273·0-470·0) for nivolumab 1 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 3 mg/kg, and 260·5 days (248·0-288·0) for nivolumab 3 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 1 mg/kg. An objective response was achieved in ten (10%) of 98 patients receiving nivolumab 3 mg/kg, one (33%) of three patients receiving nivolumab 1 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 1 mg/kg, 14 (23%) of 61 receiving nivolumab 1 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 3 mg/kg, and ten (19%) of 54 receiving nivolumab 3 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 1 mg/kg. Grade 3 or 4 treatment-related adverse events occurred in 13 (13%) patients in the nivolumab 3 mg/kg cohort, 18 (30%) in the nivolumab 1 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 3 mg/kg cohort, and ten (19%) in the nivolumab 3 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 1 mg/kg cohort; the most commonly reported grade 3 or 4 treatment-related adverse events were increased lipase (none vs 5 [8%] vs none) and diarrhoea (none vs 3 [5%] vs 1 [2%]). No patients in the nivolumab 1 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 1 mg/kg cohort had a grade 3 or 4 treatment-related adverse event. Six (6%) patients in the nivolumab 3 mg/kg group, seven (11%) in the nivolumab 1 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 3 mg/kg group, and four (7%) in the nivolumab 3 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 1 mg/kg group discontinued treatment due to treatment-related adverse events. Two patients who received nivolumab 1 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 3 mg/kg died from treatment-related adverse events (myasthenia gravis and worsening of renal failure), and one patient who received nivolumab 3 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 1 mg/kg died from treatment-related pneumonitis. Nivolumab monotherapy and nivolumab plus ipilimumab showed antitumour activity with durable responses and manageable safety profiles in previously treated patients with SCLC. These data suggest a potential new treatment approach for a population of patients with limited treatment options and support the evaluation of nivolumab and nivolumab plus ipilimumab in phase 3 randomised controlled trials in SCLC. Bristol-Myers Squibb.


#44 Neural mechanisms of transient neocortical beta rhythms Converging evidence from humans, computational modeling, monkeys, and mice PDF logo

Sherman, Maxwell A.; Lee, Shane; Law, Robert; Haegens, Saskia; Thorn, Catherine A.; Hämäläinen, Matti; Moore, Christopher I.; Jones, Stephanie R.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Volume 113, Issue 33, Pages 201604135–E4894

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Human neocortical 15-29-Hz beta oscillations are strong predictors of perceptual and motor performance. However, the mechanistic origin of beta in vivo is unknown, hindering understanding of its functional role. Combining human magnetoencephalography (MEG), computational modeling, and laminar recordings in animals, we present a new theory that accounts for the origin of spontaneous neocortical beta. In our MEG data, spontaneous beta activity from somatosensory and frontal cortex emerged as noncontinuous beta events typically lasting <150 ms with a stereotypical waveform. Computational modeling uniquely designed to infer the electrical currents underlying these signals showed that beta events could emerge from the integration of nearly synchronous bursts of excitatory synaptic drive targeting proximal and distal dendrites of pyramidal neurons, where the defining feature of a beta event was a strong distal drive that lasted one beta period (∼50 ms). This beta mechanism rigorously accounted for the beta event profiles; several other mechanisms did not. The spatial location of synaptic drive in the model to supragranular and infragranular layers was critical to the emergence of beta events and led to the prediction that beta events should be associated with a specific laminar current profile. Laminar recordings in somatosensory neocortex from anesthetized mice and awake monkeys supported these predictions, suggesting this beta mechanism is conserved across species and recording modalities. These findings make several predictions about optimal states for perceptual and motor performance and guide causal interventions to modulate beta for optimal function.


#45 Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function Link logo

Pattaro Cristian; Teumer Alexander; Gorski Mathias; Chu Audrey Y; Li Man; Mijatovic Vladan; Garnaas Maija; Tin Adrienne; Sorice Rossella; Li Yong; Taliun Daniel; Olden Matthias; Foster Meredith; Yang Qiong; Chen Ming-Huei; Pers Tune H; Johnson Andrew D; Ko Yi-An; Fuchsberger Christian; Tayo Bamidele; Nalls Michael et al

Nature Communications

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Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways.


#46 Psychobiotics and the Manipulation of Bacteria-Gut-Brain Signals PDF logo

Sarkar A; Lehto SM; Harty S; Dinan TG; Cryan JF; Burnet PW

Trends in Neurosciences Volume 39, Issue 11

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Psychobiotics were previously defined as live bacteria (probiotics) which, when ingested, confer mental health benefits through interactions with commensal gut bacteria. We expand this definition to encompass prebiotics, which enhance the growth of beneficial gut bacteria. We review probiotic and prebiotic effects on emotional, cognitive, systemic, and neural variables relevant to health and disease. We discuss gut-brain signalling mechanisms enabling psychobiotic effects, such as metabolite production. Overall, knowledge of how the microbiome responds to exogenous influence remains limited. We tabulate several important research questions and issues, exploration of which will generate both mechanistic insights and facilitate future psychobiotic development. We suggest the definition of psychobiotics be expanded beyond probiotics and prebiotics to include other means of influencing the microbiome.


#47 Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015 Link logo PDF logo

Wang H; Naghavi M; Allen C & GBD 2015 Mortality and Causes of Death collaborators

The Lancet Volume 388, Issue 10053, Pages 1775–1812

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In transitioning from the Millennium Development Goal to the Sustainable Development Goal era, it is imperative to comprehensively assess progress toward reducing maternal mortality to identify areas of success, remaining challenges, and frame policy discussions. We aimed to quantify maternal mortality throughout the world by underlying cause and age from 1990 to 2015. We estimated maternal mortality at the global, regional, and national levels from 1990 to 2015 for ages 10-54 years by systematically compiling and processing all available data sources from 186 of 195 countries and territories, 11 of which were analysed at the subnational level. We quantified eight underlying causes of maternal death and four timing categories, improving estimation methods since GBD 2013 for adult all-cause mortality, HIV-related maternal mortality, and late maternal death. Secondary analyses then allowed systematic examination of drivers of trends, including the relation between maternal mortality and coverage of specific reproductive health-care services as well as assessment of observed versus expected maternal mortality as a function of Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a summary indicator derived from measures of income per capita, educational attainment, and fertility. Only ten countries achieved MDG 5, but 122 of 195 countries have already met SDG 3.1. Geographical disparities widened between 1990 and 2015 and, in 2015, 24 countries still had a maternal mortality ratio greater than 400. The proportion of all maternal deaths occurring in the bottom two SDI quintiles, where haemorrhage is the dominant cause of maternal death, increased from roughly 68% in 1990 to more than 80% in 2015. The middle SDI quintile improved the most from 1990 to 2015, but also has the most complicated causal profile. Maternal mortality in the highest SDI quintile is mostly due to other direct maternal disorders, indirect maternal disorders, and abortion, ectopic pregnancy, and/or miscarriage. Historical patterns suggest achievement of SDG 3.1 will require 91% coverage of one antenatal care visit, 78% of four antenatal care visits, 81% of in-facility delivery, and 87% of skilled birth attendance. Several challenges to improving reproductive health lie ahead in the SDG era. Countries should establish or renew systems for collection and timely dissemination of health data; expand coverage and improve quality of family planning services, including access to contraception and safe abortion to address high adolescent fertility; invest in improving health system capacity, including coverage of routine reproductive health care and of more advanced obstetric care-including EmOC; adapt health systems and data collection systems to monitor and reverse the increase in indirect, other direct, and late maternal deaths, especially in high SDI locations; and examine their own performance with respect to their SDI level, using that information to formulate strategies to improve performance and ensure optimum reproductive health of their population. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


#48 The global burden of viral hepatitis from 1990 to 2013:findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 Link logo PDF logo

Stanaway, Jeffrey D.; Flaxman, Abraham D.; Naghavi, Mohsen; Fitzmaurice, Christina; Vos, Theo; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.; Assadi, Reza; Bhala, Neeraj; Cowie, Benjamin; Forouzanfour, Mohammad H.; Groeger, Justina; Hanafiah, Khayriyyah Mohd; Jacobsen, Kathryn H.; James, Spencer L.; MacLachlan, Jennifer; Malekzadeh, Reza; Martin, Natasha K.; Mokdad, Ali A.; Mokdad, Ali H.

The Lancet Volume 388, Issue 10049, Pages 1081–1088

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With recent improvements in vaccines and treatments against viral hepatitis, an improved understanding of the burden of viral hepatitis is needed to inform global intervention strategies. We used data from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study to estimate morbidity and mortality for acute viral hepatitis, and for cirrhosis and liver cancer caused by viral hepatitis, by age, sex, and country from 1990 to 2013. We estimated mortality using natural history models for acute hepatitis infections and GBD's cause-of-death ensemble model for cirrhosis and liver cancer. We used meta-regression to estimate total cirrhosis and total liver cancer prevalence, as well as the proportion of cirrhosis and liver cancer attributable to each cause. We then estimated cause-specific prevalence as the product of the total prevalence and the proportion attributable to a specific cause. Disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) were calculated as the sum of years of life lost (YLLs) and years lived with disability (YLDs). Between 1990 and 2013, global viral hepatitis deaths increased from 0·89 million (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 0·86-0·94) to 1·45 million (1·38-1·54); YLLs from 31·0 million (29·6-32·6) to 41·6 million (39·1-44·7); YLDs from 0·65 million (0·45-0·89) to 0·87 million (0·61-1·18); and DALYs from 31·7 million (30·2-33·3) to 42·5 million (39·9-45·6). In 2013, viral hepatitis was the seventh (95% UI seventh to eighth) leading cause of death worldwide, compared with tenth (tenth to 12th) in 1990. Viral hepatitis is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Unlike most communicable diseases, the absolute burden and relative rank of viral hepatitis increased between 1990 and 2013. The enormous health loss attributable to viral hepatitis, and the availability of effective vaccines and treatments, suggests an important opportunity to improve public health. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


#49 Natural history of the infant gut microbiome and impact of antibiotic treatment on bacterial strain diversity and stability Link logo PDF logo

Yassour Moran; Vatanen Teemu; Siljander Heli; Hämäläinen Anu-Maaria; Härkönen Taina; Ryhänen Samppa; Franzosa Eric; Vlamakis Hera; Huttenhower Curtis; Gevers Dirk; Lander Eric; Knip Mikael; the DIABIMMUNE Study Group; Xavier Ramnik

Science Translational Medicine Volume 8, Issue 343, Pages 343ra81–343ra81

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The gut microbial community is dynamic during the first 3 years of life, before stabilizing to an adult-like state. However, little is known about the impact of environmental factors on the developing human gut microbiome. We report a longitudinal study of the gut microbiome based on DNA sequence analysis of monthly stool samples and clinical information from 39 children, about half of whom received multiple courses of antibiotics during the first 3 years of life. Whereas the gut microbiome of most children born by vaginal delivery was dominated by Bacteroides species, the four children born by cesarean section and about 20% of vaginally born children lacked Bacteroides in the first 6 to 18 months of life. Longitudinal sampling, coupled with whole-genome shotgun sequencing, allowed detection of strain-level variation as well as the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes. The microbiota of antibiotic-treated children was less diverse in terms of both bacterial species and strains, with some species often dominated by single strains. In addition, we observed short-term composition changes between consecutive samples from children treated with antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance genes carried on microbial chromosomes showed a peak in abundance after antibiotic treatment followed by a sharp decline, whereas some genes carried on mobile elements persisted longer after antibiotic therapy ended. Our results highlight the value of high-density longitudinal sampling studies with high-resolution strain profiling for studying the establishment and response to perturbation of the infant gut microbiome.


#50 Global, regional, national, and selected subnational levels of stillbirths, neonatal, infant, and under-5 mortality, 1980-2015:a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015 Link logo

Wang, Haidong; Bhutta, Zulfiriar A.; Coates, Matthew M.; Coggeshall, Megan; Dandona, Lalit; Diallo, Khassoum; Franca, Elisabeth Barboza; Fraser, Maya; Fullman, Nancy; Gething, Peter W.; Hay, Simon I.; Kinfu, Yohannes; Kita, Maaya; Kulikoff, Xie Rachel; La

The Lancet Volume 388, Issue 10053, Pages 1725–1774

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Established in 2000, Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG4) catalysed extraordinary political, financial, and social commitments to reduce under-5 mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. At the country level, the pace of progress in improving child survival has varied markedly, highlighting a crucial need to further examine potential drivers of accelerated or slowed decreases in child mortality. The Global Burden of Disease 2015 Study (GBD 2015) provides an analytical framework to comprehensively assess these trends for under-5 mortality, age-specific and cause-specific mortality among children under 5 years, and stillbirths by geography over time. Drawing from analytical approaches developed and refined in previous iterations of the GBD study, we generated updated estimates of child mortality by age group (neonatal, post-neonatal, ages 1-4 years, and under 5) for 195 countries and territories and selected subnational geographies, from 1980-2015. We also estimated numbers and rates of stillbirths for these geographies and years. Gaussian process regression with data source adjustments for sampling and non-sampling bias was applied to synthesise input data for under-5 mortality for each geography. Age-specific mortality estimates were generated through a two-stage age-sex splitting process, and stillbirth estimates were produced with a mixed-effects model, which accounted for variable stillbirth definitions and data source-specific biases. For GBD 2015, we did a series of novel analyses to systematically quantify the drivers of trends in child mortality across geographies. First, we assessed observed and expected levels and annualised rates of decrease for under-5 mortality and stillbirths as they related to the Soci-demographic Index (SDI). Second, we examined the ratio of recorded and expected levels of child mortality, on the basis of SDI, across geographies, as well as differences in recorded and expected annualised rates of change for under-5 mortality. Third, we analysed levels and cause compositions of under-5 mortality, across time and geographies, as they related to rising SDI. Finally, we decomposed the changes in under-5 mortality to changes in SDI at the global level, as well as changes in leading causes of under-5 deaths for countries and territories. We documented each step of the GBD 2015 child mortality estimation process, as well as data sources, in accordance with the Guidelines for Accurate and Transparent Health Estimates Reporting (GATHER). Globally, 5·8 million (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 5·7-6·0) children younger than 5 years died in 2015, representing a 52·0% (95% UI 50·7-53·3) decrease in the number of under-5 deaths since 1990. Neonatal deaths and stillbirths fell at a slower pace since 1990, decreasing by 42·4% (41·3-43·6) to 2·6 million (2·6-2·7) neonatal deaths and 47·0% (35·1-57·0) to 2·1 million (1·8-2·5) stillbirths in 2015. Between 1990 and 2015, global under-5 mortality decreased at an annualised rate of decrease of 3·0% (2·6-3·3), falling short of the 4·4% annualised rate of decrease required to achieve MDG4. During this time, 58 countries met or exceeded the pace of progress required to meet MDG4. Between 2000, the year MDG4 was formally enacted, and 2015, 28 additional countries that did not achieve the 4·4% rate of decrease from 1990 met the MDG4 pace of decrease. However, absolute levels of under-5 mortality remained high in many countries, with 11 countries still recording rates exceeding 100 per 1000 livebirths in 2015. Marked decreases in under-5 deaths due to a number of communicable diseases, including lower respiratory infections, diarrhoeal diseases, measles, and malaria, accounted for much of the progress in lowering overall under-5 mortality in low-income countries. Compared with gains achieved for infectious diseases and nutritional deficiencies, the persisting toll of neonatal conditions and congenital anomalies on child survival became evident, especially in low-income and low-middle-income countries. We found sizeable heterogeneities in comparing observed and expected rates of under-5 mortality, as well as differences in observed and expected rates of change for under-5 mortality. At the global level, we recorded a divergence in observed and expected levels of under-5 mortality starting in 2000, with the observed trend falling much faster than what was expected based on SDI through 2015. Between 2000 and 2015, the world recorded 10·3 million fewer under-5 deaths than expected on the basis of improving SDI alone. Gains in child survival have been large, widespread, and in many places in the world, faster than what was anticipated based on improving levels of development. Yet some countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, still had high rates of under-5 mortality in 2015. Unless these countries are able to accelerate reductions in child deaths at an extraordinary pace, their achievement of proposed SDG targets is unlikely. Improving the evidence base on drivers that might hasten the pace of progress for child survival, ranging from cost-effective intervention packages to innovative financing mechanisms, is vital to charting the pathways for ultimately ending preventable child deaths by 2030. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


#51 Physical exercise increases adult hippocampal neurogenesis in male rats provided it is aerobic and sustained Link logo PDF logo

Nokia, Miriam;Lensu, Sanna;Ahtiainen, Juha;Johansson, Petra P.;Koch, Lauren G.;Britton, Steven L.;Kainulainen, Heikki

Journal of Physiology Volume 594, Issue 7, Pages n/a–n/a

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Aerobic exercise such as running enhances adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) in rodents. Little is known about the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIT) or of purely anaerobic resistance training on AHN. Here, compared to a sedentary lifestyle, we report a very modest effect of HIT and no effect of resistance training on AHN in adult male rats. We find most AHN in rats that were selectively bred for an innately high response to aerobic exercise that also run voluntarily and - increase maximum running capacity. Our results confirm that sustained aerobic exercise is key in improving AHN. Aerobic exercise, such as running, has positive effects on brain structure and function, for example, adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) and learning. Whether high-intensity interval training (HIT), referring to alternating short bouts of very intense anaerobic exercise with recovery periods, or anaerobic resistance training (RT) has similar effects on AHN is unclear. In addition, individual genetic variation in the overall response to physical exercise likely plays a part in the effects of exercise on AHN but is less studied. Recently, we developed polygenic rat models that gain differentially for running capacity in response to aerobic treadmill training. Here we subjected these Low Response Trainer (LRT) and High Response Trainer (HRT) adult male rats to various forms of physical exercise for 6 to 8 weeks and examined its effects on AHN. Compared to sedentary animals, the highest number of doublecortin-positive hippocampal cells was observed in HRT rats that ran voluntarily on a running wheel while HIT on the treadmill had a smaller, statistically non-significant effect on AHN. AHN was elevated in both LRT and HRT rats that endurance trained on a treadmill compared to those that performed RT by climbing a vertical ladder with weights, despite their significant gain in strength. Furthermore, RT had no effect on proliferation (Ki67), maturation (doublecortin) or survival (BrdU) of new adult-born hippocampal neurons in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results suggest physical exercise promotes AHN most if it is aerobic and sustained, and especially when accompanied by a heightened genetic predisposition for response to physical exercise. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.


#52 Mutational signatures of ionizing radiation in second malignancies Open access logo Link logo

Behjati; Sam; Gundem; Gunes; Wedge; David C.; Roberts; Nicola D.; Tarpey; Patrick S.; Cooke; Susanna L.; Van Loo; Peter; Alexandrov; Ludmil B.; Ramakrishna; Manasa; Davies; Helen; Nik-Zainal; Serena; Hardy; Claire; Latimer; Calli; Raine; Keiran M.; Stebbi

Nature Communications

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Ionizing radiation is a potent carcinogen, inducing cancer through DNA damage. The signatures of mutations arising in human tissues following in vivo exposure to ionizing radiation have not been documented. Here, we searched for signatures of ionizing radiation in 12 radiation-associated second malignancies of different tumour types. Two signatures of somatic mutation characterize ionizing radiation exposure irrespective of tumour type. Compared with 319 radiation-naive tumours, radiation-associated tumours carry a median extra 201 deletions genome-wide, sized 1-100 base pairs often with microhomology at the junction. Unlike deletions of radiation-naive tumours, these show no variation in density across the genome or correlation with sequence context, replication timing or chromatin structure. Furthermore, we observe a significant increase in balanced inversions in radiation-associated tumours. Both small deletions and inversions generate driver mutations. Thus, ionizing radiation generates distinctive mutational signatures that explain its carcinogenic potential.


#53 The genetics of blood pressure regulation and its target organs from association studies in 342,415 individuals Link logo

Ehret; Georg B.; Ferreira; Teresa; Chasman; Daniel I.; Jackson; Anne U.; Schmidt; Ellen M.; Johnson; Toby; Thorleifsson; Gudmar; Luan; Jian'an; Donnelly; Louise A.; Kanoni; Stavroula; Petersen; Ann -Kristin; Pihurl; Vasyl; Strawbridge; Rona J.; Shungin; Dmitry; Hughes; Maria F.; Meirelles; Osorio; Kaakinen; Marika; Bouatia-Naji; Nabila; Kristiansson; Kati; Shah; Sonia; Kleber; Marcus E.; Guo; Xiuqing; Lyytikäinen; Leo-Pekka; Fava; Cristiano; Eriksson; Nidas; Nolte; Ilja M.; Magnusson; Patrik K.;

Nature Genetics

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To dissect the genetic architecture of blood pressure and assess effects on target organ damage, we analyzed 128,272 SNPs from targeted and genome-wide arrays in 201,529 individuals of European ancestry, and genotypes from an additional 140,886 individuals were used for validation. We identified 66 blood pressure-associated loci, of which 17 were new; 15 harbored multiple distinct association signals. The 66 index SNPs were enriched for cis-regulatory elements, particularly in vascular endothelial cells, consistent with a primary role in blood pressure control through modulation of vascular tone across multiple tissues. The 66 index SNPs combined in a risk score showed comparable effects in 64,421 individuals of non-European descent. The 66-SNP blood pressure risk score was significantly associated with target organ damage in multiple tissues but with minor effects in the kidney. Our findings expand current knowledge of blood pressure-related pathways and highlight tissues beyond the classical renal system in blood pressure regulation.


#54 Contemporary management of acute right ventricular failure:a statement from the Heart Failure Association and the Working Group on Pulmonary Circulation and Right Ventricular Function of the European Society of Cardiology Link logo PDF logo

Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Celutkiene, Jelena; Bettex, Dominique; Bueno, Hector; Chioncel, Ovidiu; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G.; Falk, Volkmar; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Gibbs, Simon; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Lassus, Johan; Masip, Josep; Mueller, Christian; Mullens, Wilfried; Naeije, Robert; Nordegraaf, Anton Vonk; Parissis, John; Riley, Jillian P.; Ristic, Arsen

European Journal of Heart Failure Volume 18, Issue 3, Pages 226–241

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Acute right ventricular (RV) failure is a complex clinical syndrome that results from many causes. Research efforts have disproportionately focused on the failing left ventricle, but recently the need has been recognized to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of RV anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology, and of management approaches. Right ventricular mechanics and function are altered in the setting of either pressure overload or volume overload. Failure may also result from a primary reduction of myocardial contractility owing to ischaemia, cardiomyopathy, or arrhythmia. Dysfunction leads to impaired RV filling and increased right atrial pressures. As dysfunction progresses to overt RV failure, the RV chamber becomes more spherical and tricuspid regurgitation is aggravated, a cascade leading to increasing venous congestion. Ventricular interdependence results in impaired left ventricular filling, a decrease in left ventricular stroke volume, and ultimately low cardiac output and cardiogenic shock. Identification and treatment of the underlying cause of RV failure, such as acute pulmonary embolism, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute decompensation of chronic pulmonary hypertension, RV infarction, or arrhythmia, is the primary management strategy. Judicious fluid management, use of inotropes and vasopressors, assist devices, and a strategy focusing on RV protection for mechanical ventilation if required all play a role in the clinical care of these patients. Future research should aim to address the remaining areas of uncertainty which result from the complexity of RV haemodynamics and lack of conclusive evidence regarding RV-specific treatment approaches.


#55 An integrated genetic-epigenetic analysis of schizophrenia:evidence for co-localization of genetic associations and differential DNA methylation Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Hannon, Eilis; Dempster, Emma; Viana, Joana; Burrage, Joe; Smith, Adam R.; Macdonald, Ruby; St Clair, David; Mustard, Colette; Breen, Gerome; Therman, Sebastian; Kaprio, Jaakko; Toulopoulou, Timothea; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Bohlken, Marc M.; Kahn, Rene S.; Nenadic, Igor; Hultman, Christina M.; Murray, Robin M.; Collier, David A.; Bass, Nick

Genome Biology (Online Edition) Volume 17, Issue 1

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Schizophrenia is a highly heritable, neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by episodic psychosis and altered cognitive function. Despite success in identifying genetic variants associated with schizophrenia, there remains uncertainty about the causal genes involved in disease pathogenesis and how their function is regulated. We performed a multi-stage epigenome-wide association study, quantifying genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation in a total of 1714 individuals from three independent sample cohorts. We have identified multiple differentially methylated positions and regions consistently associated with schizophrenia across the three cohorts; these effects are independent of important confounders such as smoking. We also show that epigenetic variation at multiple loci across the genome contributes to the polygenic nature of schizophrenia. Finally, we show how DNA methylation quantitative trait loci in combination with Bayesian co-localization analyses can be used to annotate extended genomic regions nominated by studies of schizophrenia, and to identify potential regulatory variation causally involved in disease. This study represents the first systematic integrated analysis of genetic and epigenetic variation in schizophrenia, introducing a methodological approach that can be used to inform epigenome-wide association study analyses of other complex traits and diseases. We demonstrate the utility of using a polygenic risk score to identify molecular variation associated with etiological variation, and of using DNA methylation quantitative trait loci to refine the functional and regulatory variation associated with schizophrenia risk variants. Finally, we present strong evidence for the co-localization of genetic associations for schizophrenia and differential DNA methylation.


#56 Targeting BRCA1 and BRCA2 Deficiencies with G-Quadruplex-Interacting Compounds Link logo PDF logo

Zimmer, Jutta; Tacconi, Eliana M. C.; Folio, Cecilia; Badie, Sophie; Porru, Manuela; Klare, Kerstin; Tumiati, Manuela; Markkanen, Enni; Halder, Swagata; Ryan, Anderson; Jackson, Stephen P.; Ramadan, Kristijan; Kuznetsov, Sergey G.; Biroccio, Annamaria; Sale, Julian E.; Tarsounas, Madalena

Molecular Cell Volume 61, Issue 3, Pages 449–460

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G-quadruplex (G4)-forming genomic sequences, including telomeres, represent natural replication fork barriers. Stalled replication forks can be stabilized and restarted by homologous recombination (HR), which also repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) arising at collapsed forks. We have previously shown that HR facilitates telomere replication. Here, we demonstrate that the replication efficiency of guanine-rich (G-rich) telomeric repeats is decreased significantly in cells lacking HR. Treatment with the G4-stabilizing compound pyridostatin (PDS) increases telomere fragility in BRCA2-deficient cells, suggesting that G4 formation drives telomere instability. Remarkably, PDS reduces proliferation of HR-defective cells by inducing DSB accumulation, checkpoint activation, and deregulated G2/M progression and by enhancing the replication defect intrinsic to HR deficiency. PDS toxicity extends to HR-defective cells that have acquired olaparib resistance through loss of 53BP1 or REV7. Altogether, these results highlight the therapeutic potential of G4-stabilizing drugs to selectively eliminate HR-compromised cells and tumors, including those resistant to PARP inhibition.


#57 The novel biomarker-based ABC (age, biomarkers, clinical history)-bleeding risk score for patients with atrial fibrillation: a derivation and validation study PDF logo

Hijazi Z, Oldgren J, Lindback J, Alexander JH, Connolly SJ, Eikelboom JW, Ezekowitz MD, Held C, Hylek EM, Lopes RD, Siegbahn A, Yusuf S, Granger CB, Wallentin L

The Lancet Volume 387, Issue 10035, Pages 2302–2311

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The benefit of oral anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation is based on a balance between reduction in ischaemic stroke and increase in major bleeding. We aimed to develop and validate a new biomarker-based risk score to improve the prognostication of major bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation. We developed and internally validated a new biomarker-based risk score for major bleeding in 14 537 patients with atrial fibrillation randomised to apixaban versus warfarin in the ARISTOTLE trial and externally validated it in 8468 patients with atrial fibrillation randomised to dabigatran versus warfarin in the RE-LY trial. Plasma samples for determination of candidate biomarker concentrations were obtained at randomisation. Major bleeding events were centrally adjudicated. The predictive values of biomarkers and clinical variables were assessed with Cox regression models. The most important variables were included in the score with weights proportional to the model coefficients. The ARISTOTLE and RE-LY trials are registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, numbers NCT00412984 and NCT00262600, respectively. The most important predictors for major bleeding were the concentrations of the biomarkers growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15), high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (cTnT-hs) and haemoglobin, age, and previous bleeding. The ABC-bleeding score (age, biomarkers [GDF-15, cTnT-hs, and haemoglobin], and clinical history [previous bleeding]) score yielded a higher c-index than the conventional HAS-BLED and the newer ORBIT scores for major bleeding in both the derivation cohort (0·68 [95% CI 0·66-0·70] vs 0·61 [0·59-0·63] vs 0·65 [0·62-0·67], respectively; ABC-bleeding vs HAS-BLED p<0·0001 and ABC-bleeding vs ORBIT p=0·0008). ABC-bleeding score also yielded a higher c-index score in the the external validation cohort (0·71 [95% CI 0·68-0·73] vs 0·62 [0·59-0·64] for HAS-BLED vs 0·68 [0·65-0·70] for ORBIT; ABC-bleeding vs HAS-BLED p<0·0001 and ABC-bleeding vs ORBIT p=0·0016). A modified ABC-bleeding score using alternative biomarkers (haematocrit, cTnI-hs, cystatin C, or creatinine clearance) also outperformed the HAS-BLED and ORBIT scores. The ABC-bleeding score, using age, history of bleeding, and three biomarkers (haemoglobin, cTn-hs, and GDF-15 or cystatin C/CKD-EPI) was internally and externally validated and calibrated in large cohorts of patients with atrial fibrillation receiving anticoagulation therapy. The ABC-bleeding score performed better than HAS-BLED and ORBIT scores and should be useful as decision support on anticoagulation treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation. BMS, Pfizer, Boehringer Ingelheim, Roche Diagnostics.


#58 Sexual Activity Without Condoms and Risk of HIV Transmission in Serodifferent Couples When the HIV-Positive Partner Is Using Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy Link logo PDF logo

Rodger, Alison J.; Cambiano, Valentina; Bruun, Tina; Vernazza, Pietro; Collins, Simon; van Lunzen, Jan; Corbelli, Giulio Maria; Estrada, Vicente; Geretti, Anna Maria; Beloukas, Apostolos; Asboe, David; Viciana, Pompeyo; Gutierrez, Felix; Clotet, Bonaventura; Pradier, Christian; Gerstoft, Jan; Weber, Rainer; Westling, Katarina; Wandeler, Gilles; Prins, Janm M.

JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association Volume 316, Issue 2

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A key factor in assessing the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) as a prevention strategy is the absolute risk of HIV transmission through condomless sex with suppressed HIV-1 RNA viral load for both anal and vaginal sex. To evaluate the rate of within-couple HIV transmission (heterosexual and men who have sex with men [MSM]) during periods of sex without condoms and when the HIV-positive partner had HIV-1 RNA load less than 200 copies/mL. The prospective, observational PARTNER (Partners of People on ART-A New Evaluation of the Risks) study was conducted at 75 clinical sites in 14 European countries and enrolled 1166 HIV serodifferent couples (HIV-positive partner taking suppressive ART) who reported condomless sex (September 2010 to May 2014). Eligibility criteria for inclusion of couple-years of follow-up were condomless sex and HIV-1 RNA load less than 200 copies/mL. Anonymized phylogenetic analysis compared couples' HIV-1 polymerase and envelope sequences if an HIV-negative partner became infected to determine phylogenetically linked transmissions. Condomless sexual activity with an HIV-positive partner taking virally suppressive ART. Risk of within-couple HIV transmission to the HIV-negative partner. Among 1166 enrolled couples, 888 (mean age, 42 years [IQR, 35-48]; 548 heterosexual [61.7%] and 340 MSM [38.3%]) provided 1238 eligible couple-years of follow-up (median follow-up, 1.3 years [IQR, 0.8-2.0]). At baseline, couples reported condomless sex for a median of 2 years (IQR, 0.5-6.3). Condomless sex with other partners was reported by 108 HIV-negative MSM (33%) and 21 heterosexuals (4%). During follow-up, couples reported condomless sex a median of 37 times per year (IQR, 15-71), with MSM couples reporting approximately 22 000 condomless sex acts and heterosexuals approximately 36 000. Although 11 HIV-negative partners became HIV-positive (10 MSM; 1 heterosexual; 8 reported condomless sex with other partners), no phylogenetically linked transmissions occurred over eligible couple-years of follow-up, giving a rate of within-couple HIV transmission of zero, with an upper 95% confidence limit of 0.30/100 couple-years of follow-up. The upper 95% confidence limit for condomless anal sex was 0.71 per 100 couple-years of follow-up. Among serodifferent heterosexual and MSM couples in which the HIV-positive partner was using suppressive ART and who reported condomless sex, during median follow-up of 1.3 years per couple, there were no documented cases of within-couple HIV transmission (upper 95% confidence limit, 0.30/100 couple-years of follow-up). Additional longer-term follow-up is necessary to provide more precise estimates of risk.


#59 Worldwide trends in diabetes since 1980: a pooled analysis of 751 population-based studies with 4.4 million participants Link logo PDF logo

Zhou; Bin; Lu; Yuan; Hajifathalian; Kaveh; Bentham; James; Di Cesare; Mariachiara; Danaei; Goodarz; Bixby; Honor; Cowan; Melanie J.; Ali; Mohammed K.; Taddei; Cristina; Lo; Wei-Cheng; Reis-Santos; Barbara; Stevens; Gretchen A.; Riley; Leanne M.; Miranda; J. Jaime; Bjerregaard; Peter; Rivera; Juan A.; Fouad; Heba M.; Ma; Guansheng; Mbanya; Jean Claude N.; McGarvey; Stephen T.; Mohan; Viswanathan; Onat; Altan; Ramachandran; Ambady; Ben Romdhane; Habiba; Paciorek; Christopher J.; Bennett; James E.;

The Lancet Volume 387, Issue 10027, Pages 1513–1530

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One of the global targets for non-communicable diseases is to halt, by 2025, the rise in the age-standardised adult prevalence of diabetes at its 2010 levels. We aimed to estimate worldwide trends in diabetes, how likely it is for countries to achieve the global target, and how changes in prevalence, together with population growth and ageing, are affecting the number of adults with diabetes. We pooled data from population-based studies that had collected data on diabetes through measurement of its biomarkers. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends in diabetes prevalence-defined as fasting plasma glucose of 7·0 mmol/L or higher, or history of diagnosis with diabetes, or use of insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs-in 200 countries and territories in 21 regions, by sex and from 1980 to 2014. We also calculated the posterior probability of meeting the global diabetes target if post-2000 trends continue. We used data from 751 studies including 4 372 000 adults from 146 of the 200 countries we make estimates for. Global age-standardised diabetes prevalence increased from 4·3% (95% credible interval 2·4-7·0) in 1980 to 9·0% (7·2-11·1) in 2014 in men, and from 5·0% (2·9-7·9) to 7·9% (6·4-9·7) in women. The number of adults with diabetes in the world increased from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 (28·5% due to the rise in prevalence, 39·7% due to population growth and ageing, and 31·8% due to interaction of these two factors). Age-standardised adult diabetes prevalence in 2014 was lowest in northwestern Europe, and highest in Polynesia and Micronesia, at nearly 25%, followed by Melanesia and the Middle East and north Africa. Between 1980 and 2014 there was little change in age-standardised diabetes prevalence in adult women in continental western Europe, although crude prevalence rose because of ageing of the population. By contrast, age-standardised adult prevalence rose by 15 percentage points in men and women in Polynesia and Micronesia. In 2014, American Samoa had the highest national prevalence of diabetes (>30% in both sexes), with age-standardised adult prevalence also higher than 25% in some other islands in Polynesia and Micronesia. If post-2000 trends continue, the probability of meeting the global target of halting the rise in the prevalence of diabetes by 2025 at the 2010 level worldwide is lower than 1% for men and is 1% for women. Only nine countries for men and 29 countries for women, mostly in western Europe, have a 50% or higher probability of meeting the global target. Since 1980, age-standardised diabetes prevalence in adults has increased, or at best remained unchanged, in every country. Together with population growth and ageing, this rise has led to a near quadrupling of the number of adults with diabetes worldwide. The burden of diabetes, both in terms of prevalence and number of adults affected, has increased faster in low-income and middle-income countries than in high-income countries. Wellcome Trust.


#60 Evidence of a genetic link between endometriosis and ovarian cancer Link logo PDF logo

Lee , Alice W.; Templeman, Claire; Stram, Douglas A; al, et; , ; Nevanlinna, Heli ; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Butzow, Ralf

Fertility & Sterility Volume 105, Issue 1, Pages 35–43.e10

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To evaluate whether endometriosis-associated genetic variation affects risk of ovarian cancer. Pooled genetic analysis. University hospital. Genetic data from 46,176 participants (15,361 ovarian cancer cases and 30,815 controls) from 41 ovarian cancer studies. None. Endometriosis-associated genetic variation and ovarian cancer. There was significant evidence of an association between endometriosis-related genetic variation and ovarian cancer risk, especially for the high-grade serous and clear cell histotypes. Overall we observed 15 significant burden statistics, which was three times more than expected. By focusing on candidate regions from a phenotype associated with ovarian cancer, we have shown a clear genetic link between endometriosis and ovarian cancer that warrants further follow-up. The functional significance of the identified regions and SNPs is presently uncertain, though future fine mapping and histotype-specific functional analyses may shed light on the etiologies of both gynecologic conditions.


#61 Probiotics modulated gut microbiota suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma growth in mice PDF logo

Li J; Sung CY; Lee N; Ni Y; Pihlajamäki J; Panagiotou G; El-Nezami H

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Volume 113, Issue 9, Pages 201518189–E1315

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The beneficial roles of probiotics in lowering the gastrointestinal inflammation and preventing colorectal cancer have been frequently demonstrated, but their immunomodulatory effects and mechanism in suppressing the growth of extraintestinal tumors remain unexplored. Here, we adopted a mouse model and metagenome sequencing to investigate the efficacy of probiotic feeding in controlling s.c. hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the underlying mechanism suppressing the tumor progression. Our result demonstrated that Prohep, a novel probiotic mixture, slows down the tumor growth significantly and reduces the tumor size and weight by 40% compared with the control. From a mechanistic point of view the down-regulated IL-17 cytokine and its major producer Th17 cells, whose levels decreased drastically, played critical roles in tumor reduction upon probiotics feeding. Cell staining illustrated that the reduced Th17 cells in the tumor of the probiotic-treated group is mainly caused by the reduced frequency of migratory Th17 cells from the intestine and peripheral blood. In addition, shotgun-metagenome sequencing revealed the crosstalk between gut microbial metabolites and the HCC development. Probiotics shifted the gut microbial community toward certain beneficial bacteria, including Prevotella and Oscillibacter, that are known producers of antiinflammatory metabolites, which subsequently reduced the Th17 polarization and promoted the differentiation of antiinflammatory Treg/Tr1 cells in the gut. Overall, our study offers novel insights into the mechanism by which probiotic treatment modulates the microbiota and influences the regulation of the T-cell differentiation in the gut, which in turn alters the level of the proinflammatory cytokines in the extraintestinal tumor microenvironment.


#62 Antilymphocyte Globulin for Prevention of Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease Link logo

Kroeger, Nicolaus; Solano, Carlos; Wolschke, Christine; Bandini, Giuseppe; Patriarca, Francesca; Pini, Massimo; Nagler, Arnon; Selleri, Carmine; Risitano, Antonio; Messina, Giuseppe; Bethge, Wolfgang; Perez de Oteiza, Jaime; Duarte, Rafael; Carella, Angelo Michele; Cimminiello, Michele; Guidi, Stefano; Finke, Juergen; Mordini, Nicola; Ferra, Christelle; Sierra, Jorge

New England Journal of Medicine Volume 374, Issue 1, Pages 43–53

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Background Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is the leading cause of later illness and death after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. We hypothesized that the inclusion of antihuman T-lymphocyte immune globulin (ATG) in a myeloablative conditioning regimen for patients with acute leukemia would result in a significant reduction in chronic GVHD 2 years after allogeneic peripheral-blood stem-cell transplantation from an HLA-identical sibling. Methods We conducted a prospective, multicenter, open-label, randomized phase 3 study of ATG as part of a conditioning regimen. A total of 168 patients were enrolled at 27 centers. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive ATG or not receive ATG, with stratification according to center and risk of disease. Results After a median follow-up of 24 months, the cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 32.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22.1 to 46.7) in the ATG group and 68.7% (95% CI, 58.4 to 80.7) in the non-ATG group (P<0.001). The rate of 2-year relapse-free survival was similar in the ATG group and the non-ATG group (59.4% [95% CI, 47.8 to 69.2] and 64.6% [95% CI, 50.9 to 75.3], respectively; P=0.21), as was the rate of overall survival (74.1% [95% CI, 62.7 to 82.5] and 77.9% [95% CI, 66.1 to 86.1], respectively; P=0.46). There were no significant between-group differences in the rates of relapse, infectious complications, acute GVHD, or adverse events. The rate of a composite end point of chronic GVHD-free and relapse-free survival at 2 years was significantly higher in the ATG group than in the non-ATG group (36.6% vs. 16.8%, P=0.005). Conclusions The inclusion of ATG resulted in a significantly lower rate of chronic GVHD after allogeneic transplantation than the rate without ATG. The survival rate was similar in the two groups, but the rate of a composite end point of chronic GVHD-free survival and relapse-free survival was higher with ATG. (Funded by the Neovii Biotech and the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00678275 .).


#63 Aliskiren, Enalapril, or Aliskiren and Enalapril in Heart Failure Link logo

McMurray John J; Krum Henry; Abraham William T; Dickstein Kenneth; Køber Lars V; Desai Akshay S; Solomon Scott D; Greenlaw Nicola; Ali M Atif; Chiang Yanntong; Shao Qing; Tarnesby Georgia; Massie Barry M; ATMOSPHERE Committees Investigators

New England Journal of Medicine Volume 374, Issue 16, Pages 1521–1532

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Background Among patients with chronic heart failure, angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce mortality and hospitalization, but the role of a renin inhibitor in such patients is unknown. We compared the ACE inhibitor enalapril with the renin inhibitor aliskiren (to test superiority or at least noninferiority) and with the combination of the two treatments (to test superiority) in patients with heart failure and a reduced ejection fraction. Methods After a single-blind run-in period, we assigned patients, in a double-blind fashion, to one of three groups: 2336 patients were assigned to receive enalapril at a dose of 5 or 10 mg twice daily, 2340 to receive aliskiren at a dose of 300 mg once daily, and 2340 to receive both treatments (combination therapy). The primary composite outcome was death from cardiovascular causes or hospitalization for heart failure. Results After a median follow-up of 36.6 months, the primary outcome occurred in 770 patients (32.9%) in the combination-therapy group and in 808 (34.6%) in the enalapril group (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85 to 1.03). The primary outcome occurred in 791 patients (33.8%) in the aliskiren group (hazard ratio vs. enalapril, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.10); the prespecified test for noninferiority was not met. There was a higher risk of hypotensive symptoms in the combination-therapy group than in the enalapril group (13.8% vs. 11.0%, P=0.005), as well as higher risks of an elevated serum creatinine level (4.1% vs. 2.7%, P=0.009) and an elevated potassium level (17.1% vs. 12.5%, P<0.001). Conclusions In patients with chronic heart failure, the addition of aliskiren to enalapril led to more adverse events without an increase in benefit. Noninferiority was not shown for aliskiren as compared with enalapril. (Funded by Novartis; ATMOSPHERE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00853658 .).


#64 Multiscale photoacoustic tomography using reversibly switchable bacterial phytochrome as a near-infrared photochromic probe Link logo

Yao, Junjie; Kaberniuk, Andrii A.; Li, Lei; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lidai; Li, Guo; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Wang, Lihong V.

Nature Methods

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Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) of genetically encoded probes allows for imaging of targeted biological processes deep in tissues with high spatial resolution; however, high background signals from blood can limit the achievable detection sensitivity. Here we describe a reversibly switchable nonfluorescent bacterial phytochrome for use in multiscale photoacoustic imaging, BphP1, with the most red-shifted absorption among genetically encoded probes. BphP1 binds a heme-derived biliverdin chromophore and is reversibly photoconvertible between red and near-infrared light-absorption states. We combined single-wavelength PAT with efficient BphP1 photoswitching, which enabled differential imaging with substantially decreased background signals, enhanced detection sensitivity, increased penetration depth and improved spatial resolution. We monitored tumor growth and metastasis with ∼100-μm resolution at depths approaching 10 mm using photoacoustic computed tomography, and we imaged individual cancer cells with a suboptical-diffraction resolution of ∼140 nm using photoacoustic microscopy. This technology is promising for biomedical studies at several scales.


#65 Blood lipids and prostate cancer: a Mendelian randomization analysis. Link logo PDF logo

Bull C; Bonilla C; Holly J; et al; Schleutker J

Genetic Epidemiology Volume 37, Issue 7, Pages 658–665

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Genome-wide association studies, which typically report regression coefficients summarizing the associations of many genetic variants with various traits, are potentially a powerful source of data for Mendelian randomization investigations. We demonstrate how such coefficients from multiple variants can be combined in a Mendelian randomization analysis to estimate the causal effect of a risk factor on an outcome. The bias and efficiency of estimates based on summarized data are compared to those based on individual-level data in simulation studies. We investigate the impact of gene-gene interactions, linkage disequilibrium, and 'weak instruments' on these estimates. Both an inverse-variance weighted average of variant-specific associations and a likelihood-based approach for summarized data give similar estimates and precision to the two-stage least squares method for individual-level data, even when there are gene-gene interactions. However, these summarized data methods overstate precision when variants are in linkage disequilibrium. If the P-value in a linear regression of the risk factor for each variant is less than 1×10⁻⁵, then weak instrument bias will be small. We use these methods to estimate the causal association of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) on coronary artery disease using published data on five genetic variants. A 30% reduction in LDL-C is estimated to reduce coronary artery disease risk by 67% (95% CI: 54% to 76%). We conclude that Mendelian randomization investigations using summarized data from uncorrelated variants are similarly efficient to those using individual-level data, although the necessary assumptions cannot be so fully assessed.


#66 Sub-classification based specific movement control exercises are superior to general exercise in sub-acute low back pain when both are combined with manual therapy: A randomized controlled trial Open access logo PDF logo

Lehtola Vesa, Luomajoki Hannu, Leinonen Ville, Gibbons Sean, Airaksinen Olavi

BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders Volume 17, Issue 1

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Clinical guidelines recommend research on sub-groups of patients with low back pain (LBP) but, to date, only few studies have been published. One sub-group of LBP is movement control impairment (MCI) and clinical tests to identify this sub-group have been developed. Also, exercises appear to be beneficial for the management of chronic LBP (CLBP), but very little is known about the management of sub-acute LBP. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted to compare the effects of general exercise versus specific movement control exercise (SMCE) on disability and function in patients with MCI within the recurrent sub-acute LBP group. Participants having a MCI attended five treatment sessions of either specific or general exercises. In both groups a short application of manual therapy was applied. The primary outcome was disability, assessed by the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ). The measurements were taken at baseline, immediately after the three months intervention and at twelve-month follow-up. Seventy patients met the inclusion criteria and were eligible for the trial. Measurements of 61 patients (SMCE n = 30 and general exercise n = 31) were completed at twelve months. (Drop-out rate 12.9 %). Patients in both groups reported significantly less disability (RMDQ) at twelve months follow-up. However, the mean change on the RMDQ between baseline and the twelve-month measurement showed statistically significantly superior improvement for the SMCE group -1.9 points (-3.9 to -0.5) 95 % (CI). The result did not reach the clinically significant three point difference. There was no statistical difference between the groups measured with Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). For subjects with non-specific recurrent sub-acute LBP and MCI an intervention consisting of SMCE and manual therapy combined may be superior to general exercise combined with manual therapy. The study protocol registration number is ISRCTN48684087 . It was registered retrospectively 18th Jan 2012.


#67 Long-Term ERK Inhibition in KRAS-Mutant Pancreatic Cancer Is Associated with MYC Degradation and Senescence-like Growth Suppression Link logo PDF logo

Hayes, Tikvah K.; Neel, Nicole F.; Hu, Chaoxin; Gautam, Prson; Chenard, Melissa; Long, Brian; Aziz, Meraj; Kassner, Michelle; Bryant, Kirsten L.; Pierobon, Mariaelena; Marayati, Raoud; Kher, Swapnil; George, Samuel D.; Xu, Mai; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Samatar, Ahmed A.; Maitra, Anirban; Wennerberg, Krister; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Yin, Hongwei H.

Cancer Cell Volume 29, Issue 1

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Induction of compensatory mechanisms and ERK reactivation has limited the effectiveness of Raf and MEK inhibitors in RAS-mutant cancers. We determined that direct pharmacologic inhibition of ERK suppressed the growth of a subset of KRAS-mutant pancreatic cancer cell lines and that concurrent phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibition caused synergistic cell death. Additional combinations that enhanced ERK inhibitor action were also identified. Unexpectedly, long-term treatment of sensitive cell lines caused senescence, mediated in part by MYC degradation and p16 reactivation. Enhanced basal PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling was associated with de novo resistance to ERK inhibitor, as were other protein kinases identified by kinome-wide siRNA screening and a genetic gain-of-function screen. Our findings reveal distinct consequences of inhibiting this kinase cascade at the level of ERK.


#68 A genome-wide approach to children's aggressive behavior: The EAGLE consortium Link logo PDF logo

Pappa I; St Pourcain B; Benke K; Cavadino A; Hakulinen C; Nivard MG; Nolte IM; et al; Seppälä I; Lehtimäki T

Aggressive Behavior Volume 40, Issue 1, Pages 56–68

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A growing body of research has demonstrated consistent links between Bandura's theory of moral disengagement and aggressive behavior in adults. The present meta-analysis was conducted to summarize the existing literature on the relation between moral disengagement and different types of aggressive behavior among school-age children and adolescents. Twenty-seven independent samples with a total of 17,776 participants (aged 8-18 years) were included in the meta-analysis. Results indicated a positive overall effect (r = .28, 95% CI [.23, .32]), supporting the hypothesis that moral disengagement is a significant correlate of aggressive behavior among children and youth. Analyses of a priori moderators revealed that effect sizes were larger for adolescents as compared to children, for studies that used a revised version of the original Bandura scale, and for studies with shared method variance. Effect sizes did not vary as a function of type of aggressive behavior, gender, or publication status. Results are discussed within the extant literature on moral disengagement and future directions are proposed.


#69 Acute heart failure and cardiogenic shock:a multidisciplinary practical guidance Link logo PDF logo

Mebazaa, A.; Tolppanen, H.; Mueller, C.; Lassus, J.; DiSomma, S.; Baksyte, G.; Cecconi, M.; Choi, D. J.; Solal, A. Cohen; Christ, M.; Masip, J.; Arrigo, M.; Nouira, S.; Ojji, D.; Peacock, F.; Richards, M.; Sato, N.; Sliwa, K.; Spinar, J.; Thiele, H.

Intensive Care Medicine Volume 42, Issue 2, Pages 147–163

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Acute heart failure (AHF) causes high burden of mortality, morbidity, and repeated hospitalizations worldwide. This guidance paper describes the tailored treatment approaches of different clinical scenarios of AHF and CS, focusing on the needs of professionals working in intensive care settings. Tissue congestion and hypoperfusion are the two leading mechanisms of end-organ injury and dysfunction, which are associated with worse outcome in AHF. Diagnosis of AHF is based on clinical assessment, measurement of natriuretic peptides, and imaging modalities. Simultaneously, emphasis should be given in rapidly identifying the underlying trigger of AHF and assessing severity of AHF, as well as in recognizing end-organ injuries. Early initiation of effective treatment is associated with superior outcomes. Oxygen, diuretics, and vasodilators are the key therapies for the initial treatment of AHF. In case of respiratory distress, non-invasive ventilation with pressure support should be promptly started. In patients with severe forms of AHF with cardiogenic shock (CS), inotropes are recommended to achieve hemodynamic stability and restore tissue perfusion. In refractory CS, when hemodynamic stabilization is not achieved, the use of mechanical support with assist devices should be considered early, before the development of irreversible end-organ injuries. A multidisciplinary approach along the entire patient journey from pre-hospital care to hospital discharge is needed to ensure early recognition, risk stratification, and the benefit of available therapies. Medical management should be planned according to the underlying mechanisms of various clinical scenarios of AHF.


#70 Dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton mediates receptor cross talk: An emerging concept in tuning receptor signaling PDF logo

Mattila PK, Batista FD, Treanor B

Journal of Cell Biology Volume 212, Issue 3

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Recent evidence implicates the actin cytoskeleton in the control of receptor signaling. This may be of particular importance in the context of immune receptors, such as the B cell receptor, where dysregulated signaling can result in autoimmunity and malignancy. Here, we discuss the role of the actin cytoskeleton in controlling receptor compartmentalization, dynamics, and clustering as a means to regulate receptor signaling through controlling the interactions with protein partners. We propose that the actin cytoskeleton is a point of integration for receptor cross talk through modulation of protein dynamics and clustering. We discuss the implication of this cross talk via the cytoskeleton for both ligand-induced and low-level constitutive (tonic) signaling necessary for immune cell survival.


#71 Oral fingolimod in primary progressive multiple sclerosis (INFORMS) : a phase 3, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial Link logo PDF logo

Lublin Fred; Miller David; Freedman Mark; Cree Bruce; Wolinsky Jerry; Weiner Howard; Lubetzki Catherine; Hartung Hans-Peter; Montalban Xavier; Uitdehaag Bernard; Merschhemke Martin; Li Bingbing; Putzki Norman; Liu Fonda; Häring Dieter; Kappos Ludwig on behalf of the INFORMS study investigators

The Lancet Volume 387, Issue 10023, Pages 1075–1084

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No treatments have been approved for primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Fingolimod, an oral sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor modulator, is effective in relapse-onset multiple sclerosis, but has not been assessed in primary progressive multiple sclerosis. We assessed the safety and efficacy of fingolimod in patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. In INFORMS, a multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel-group study, patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis recruited across 148 centres in 18 countries were randomly allocated (1:1) with computer-generated blocks to receive oral fingolimod or placebo for at least 36 months and a maximum of 5 years. Patients were initially assigned to fingolimod 1·25 mg per day or placebo (cohort 1); however, after a protocol amendment on Nov 19, 2009, patients were switched in a masked manner to fingolimod 0·5 mg, whereas those on placebo continued on matching placebo. From then onwards, patients were assigned to receive fingolimod 0·5 mg/day or placebo (cohort 2). Key inclusion criteria were age 25-65 years, clinical diagnosis of primary progressive multiple sclerosis, 1 year or more of disease progression, and two of the following criteria: positive brain MRI; positive spinal cord MRI; or positive cerebrospinal fluid. Additional eligibility criteria included disease duration of 2-10 years and objective evidence of disability progression in the previous 2 years. Patients and study investigators were masked to group assignment. We used a novel primary composite endpoint based on change from baseline in Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), 25' Timed-Walk Test, or Nine-Hole Peg Test to assess time to 3-month confirmed disability progression in study participants treated for at least 3 years. All randomised patients took at least one dose of study drug. The primary efficacy analysis included all patients in cohort 2 and those assigned to placebo in cohort 1. The safety analysis included all patients in cohorts 1 and 2. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00731692. The study is now closed. 970 patients were randomly assigned between Sept 3, 2008, and Aug 30, 2011 (147 to fingolimod 1·25 mg and 133 to placebo in cohort 1; 336 to fingolimod 0·5 mg and 354 to placebo in cohort 2). The efficacy analysis set (n=823) consisted of 336 patients randomly allocated to fingolimod 0·5 mg and 487 to placebo. Baseline characteristics were similar across groups and representative of a primary progressive multiple sclerosis population (48% women, mean age 48·5 years [SD 8·4], mean EDSS 4·67 [SD 1·03], 87% free of gadolinium-enhancing lesions). By end of study, 3-month confirmed disability progression had occurred in 232 and 338 patients in the fingolimod and placebo groups, respectively, resulting in Kaplan-Meier estimates of 77·2% (95% CI 71·87-82·51) of patients in the fingolimod group versus 80·3% (73·31-87·25) of patients in the placebo group (risk reduction 5·05%; hazard ratio 0·95, 95% CI 0·80-1·12; p=0·544). Safety results were generally consistent with those of studies of fingolimod in patients with relapse-onset multiple sclerosis. Lymphopenia occurred in 19 (6%) patients in the fingolimod group versus none in the placebo group, bradycardia in five (1%) versus one (<1%), and first-degree atrioventricular block in three (1%) versus six (1%). Serious adverse events occurred in 84 (25%) patients in the fingolimod group and 117 (24%) in the placebo group, including macular oedema in six (2%) versus six (1%), and basal-cell carcinoma in 14 (4%) versus nine (2%). The anti-inflammatory effects of fingolimod did not slow disease progression in primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Therapeutic strategies for primary progressive multiple sclerosis might need different approaches to those used for relapse-onset multiple sclerosis. Novartis Pharma AG.


#72 Familial Risk and Heritability of Cancer Among Twins in Nordic Countries Link logo PDF logo

Mucci Lorelei A; Hjelmborg Jacob B; Harris Jennifer R; Czene Kamila; Havelick David J; Scheike Thomas; Graff Rebecca E; Holst Klaus; Möller Sören; Unger Robert H; McIntosh Christina; Nuttall Elizabeth; Brandt Ingunn; Penney Kathryn L; Hartman Mikael; Kraft Peter; Parmigiani Giovanni; Christensen Kaare; Koskenvuo Markku; Holm Niels V; Heikkilä Kauko; Pukkala Eero; Skytthe Axel; Adami Hans-Olov; Kaprio Jaakko; for the Nordic Twin Study of Cancer (NorTwinCan) Collaboration

JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association Volume 315, Issue 1

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Estimates of familial cancer risk from population-based studies are essential components of cancer risk prediction. To estimate familial risk and heritability of cancer types in a large twin cohort. Prospective study of 80 309 monozygotic and 123 382 same-sex dizygotic twin individuals (N = 203 691) within the population-based registers of Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. Twins were followed up a median of 32 years between 1943 and 2010. There were 50 990 individuals who died of any cause, and 3804 who emigrated and were lost to follow-up. Shared environmental and heritable risk factors among pairs of twins. The main outcome was incident cancer. Time-to-event analyses were used to estimate familial risk (risk of cancer in an individual given a twin's development of cancer) and heritability (proportion of variance in cancer risk due to interindividual genetic differences) with follow-up via cancer registries. Statistical models adjusted for age and follow-up time, and accounted for censoring and competing risk of death. A total of 27 156 incident cancers were diagnosed in 23 980 individuals, translating to a cumulative incidence of 32%. Cancer was diagnosed in both twins among 1383 monozygotic (2766 individuals) and 1933 dizygotic (2866 individuals) pairs. Of these, 38% of monozygotic and 26% of dizygotic pairs were diagnosed with the same cancer type. There was an excess cancer risk in twins whose co-twin was diagnosed with cancer, with estimated cumulative risks that were an absolute 5% (95% CI, 4%-6%) higher in dizygotic (37%; 95% CI, 36%-38%) and an absolute 14% (95% CI, 12%-16%) higher in monozygotic twins (46%; 95% CI, 44%-48%) whose twin also developed cancer compared with the cumulative risk in the overall cohort (32%). For most cancer types, there were significant familial risks and the cumulative risks were higher in monozygotic than dizygotic twins. Heritability of cancer overall was 33% (95% CI, 30%-37%). Significant heritability was observed for the cancer types of skin melanoma (58%; 95% CI, 43%-73%), prostate (57%; 95% CI, 51%-63%), nonmelanoma skin (43%; 95% CI, 26%-59%), ovary (39%; 95% CI, 23%-55%), kidney (38%; 95% CI, 21%-55%), breast (31%; 95% CI, 11%-51%), and corpus uteri (27%; 95% CI, 11%-43%). In this long-term follow-up study among Nordic twins, there was significant excess familial risk for cancer overall and for specific types of cancer, including prostate, melanoma, breast, ovary, and uterus. This information about hereditary risks of cancers may be helpful in patient education and cancer risk counseling.


#73 Exercise and pregnancy in recreational and elite athletes: 2016 evidence summary from the IOC expert group meeting, Lausanne. Part 1 - exercise in women planning pregnancy and those who are pregnant Link logo PDF logo

Bo Kari; Artal Raul; Bakarat Ruben; Brown Wendy; Davies Gregory AL; Dooley Michael; Evenson Kelly R; Haakstad Lene AH; Henriksson-Larsen Karin; Kayser Bengt; Kinnunen Tarja I; Mottola Michelle F; Nygaard Ingrid; van Poppel Mireille; Stuge Britt; Khan Karim M

British Journal of Sports Medicine Volume 50, Issue 10, Pages 571–589

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#74 Antimicrobials:a global alliance for optimizing their rational use in intra-abdominal infections (AGORA) Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Sartelli, Massimo; Weber, Dieter G.; Ruppe, Etienne; Bassetti, Matteo; Wright, Brian J.; Ansaloni, Luca; Catena, Fausto; Coccolini, Federico; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M.; Coimbra, Raul; Moore, Ernest E.; Moore, Frederick A.; Maier, Ronald V.; De Waele, Jan J.; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Griffiths, Ewen A.; Eckmann, Christian; Brink, Adrian J.; Mazuski, John E.; May, Addison K.

World Journal of Emergency Surgery Volume 11, Issue 1

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Intra-abdominal infections (IAI) are an important cause of morbidity and are frequently associated with poor prognosis, particularly in high-risk patients. The cornerstones in the management of complicated IAIs are timely effective source control with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Empiric antimicrobial therapy is important in the management of intra-abdominal infections and must be broad enough to cover all likely organisms because inappropriate initial antimicrobial therapy is associated with poor patient outcomes and the development of bacterial resistance. The overuse of antimicrobials is widely accepted as a major driver of some emerging infections (such as C. difficile), the selection of resistant pathogens in individual patients, and for the continued development of antimicrobial resistance globally. The growing emergence of multi-drug resistant organisms and the limited development of new agents available to counteract them have caused an impending crisis with alarming implications, especially with regards to Gram-negative bacteria. An international task force from 79 different countries has joined this project by sharing a document on the rational use of antimicrobials for patients with IAIs. The project has been termed AGORA (Antimicrobials: A Global Alliance for Optimizing their Rational Use in Intra-Abdominal Infections). The authors hope that AGORA, involving many of the world's leading experts, can actively raise awareness in health workers and can improve prescribing behavior in treating IAIs.


#75 New loci for body fat percentage reveal link between adiposity and cardiometabolic disease risk Link logo

Lu Yingchang; Day Felix R; Gustafsson Stefan; Buchkovich Martin L; Na Jianbo; Bataille Veronique; Cousminer Diana L; Dastani Zari; Drong Alexander W; Esko Tonu; Evans David M; Falchi Mario; Feitosa Mary F; Ferreira Teresa; Hedman Åsa K; Haring Robin; Hysi Pirro G; Iles Mark M; Justice Anne E; Kanoni Stavroula et al

Nature Communications

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To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of adiposity and its links to cardiometabolic disease risk, we conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of body fat percentage (BF%) in up to 100,716 individuals. Twelve loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8)), of which eight were previously associated with increased overall adiposity (BMI, BF%) and four (in or near COBLL1/GRB14, IGF2BP1, PLA2G6, CRTC1) were novel associations with BF%. Seven loci showed a larger effect on BF% than on BMI, suggestive of a primary association with adiposity, while five loci showed larger effects on BMI than on BF%, suggesting association with both fat and lean mass. In particular, the loci more strongly associated with BF% showed distinct cross-phenotype association signatures with a range of cardiometabolic traits revealing new insights in the link between adiposity and disease risk.


#76 Mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke:Consensus statement by ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update 2014/2015, supported by ESO, ESMINT, ESNR and EAN Link logo

Wahlgren, Nils; Moreira, Tiago; Michel, Patrik; Steiner, Thorsten; Jansen, Olav; Cognard, Christophe; Mattle, Heinrich P.; van Zwam, Wim; Holmin, Staffan; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Petersson, Jesper; Caso, Valeria; Hacke, Werner; Mazighi, Mikael; Arnold, Marcel; Fischer, Urs; Szikora, Istvan; Pierot, Laurent; Fiehler, Jens; Gralla, Jan

International Journal of Stroke Volume 11, Issue 1, Pages 134–147

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The original version of this consensus statement on mechanical thrombectomy was approved at the European Stroke Organisation (ESO)-Karolinska Stroke Update conference in Stockholm, 16-18 November 2014. The statement has later, during 2015, been updated with new clinical trials data in accordance with a decision made at the conference. Revisions have been made at a face-to-face meeting during the ESO Winter School in Berne in February, through email exchanges and the final version has then been approved by each society. The recommendations are identical to the original version with evidence level upgraded by 20 February 2015 and confirmed by 15 May 2015. The purpose of the ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update meetings is to provide updates on recent stroke therapy research and to discuss how the results may be implemented into clinical routine. Selected topics are discussed at consensus sessions, for which a consensus statement is prepared and discussed by the participants at the meeting. The statements are advisory to the ESO guidelines committee. This consensus statement includes recommendations on mechanical thrombectomy after acute stroke. The statement is supported by ESO, European Society of Minimally Invasive Neurological Therapy (ESMINT), European Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR), and European Academy of Neurology (EAN).


#77 EAACI Molecular Allergology User's Guide Link logo PDF logo

Matricardi, P. M.; Kleine-Tebbe, J.; Hoffmann, H. J.; Valenta, R.; Hilger, C.; Hofmaier, S.; Aalberse, R. C.; Agache, I.; Asero, R.; Ballmer-Weber, B.; Barber, D.; Beyer, K.; Biedermann, T.; Bilo, M. B.; Blank, S.; Bohle, B.; Bosshard, P. P.; Breiteneder, H.; Brough, H. A.; Caraballo, L.

Pediatric Allergy & Immunology Volume 27, Issue S23, Pages 1–250

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The availability of allergen molecules ('components') from several protein families has advanced our understanding of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated responses and enabled 'component-resolved diagnosis' (CRD). The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Molecular Allergology User's Guide (MAUG) provides comprehensive information on important allergens and describes the diagnostic options using CRD. Part A of the EAACI MAUG introduces allergen molecules, families, composition of extracts, databases, and diagnostic IgE, skin, and basophil tests. Singleplex and multiplex IgE assays with components improve both sensitivity for low-abundance allergens and analytical specificity; IgE to individual allergens can yield information on clinical risks and distinguish cross-reactivity from true primary sensitization. Part B discusses the clinical and molecular aspects of IgE-mediated allergies to foods (including nuts, seeds, legumes, fruits, vegetables, cereal grains, milk, egg, meat, fish, and shellfish), inhalants (pollen, mold spores, mites, and animal dander), and Hymenoptera venom. Diagnostic algorithms and short case histories provide useful information for the clinical workup of allergic individuals targeted for CRD. Part C covers protein families containing ubiquitous, highly cross-reactive panallergens from plant (lipid transfer proteins, polcalcins, PR-10, profilins) and animal sources (lipocalins, parvalbumins, serum albumins, tropomyosins) and explains their diagnostic and clinical utility. Part D lists 100 important allergen molecules. In conclusion, IgE-mediated reactions and allergic diseases, including allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, asthma, food reactions, and insect sting reactions, are discussed from a novel molecular perspective. The EAACI MAUG documents the rapid progression of molecular allergology from basic research to its integration into clinical practice, a quantum leap in the management of allergic patients.


#78 Person-directed, non-pharmacological interventions for sleepiness at work and sleep disturbances caused by shift work Open access logo

Slanger TE; Gross JV; Pinger A; Morfeld P; Bellinger M; Duhme AL; Reichardt Ortega RA; Costa G; Driscoll TR; Foster RG; Fritschi L; Sallinen M; Liira J; Erren TC

Sao Paulo Medical Journal Volume 133, Issue 1

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Shift work results in sleep-wake disturbances, which cause sleepiness during night shifts and reduce sleep length and quality in daytime sleep after the night shift. In its serious form it is also called shift work sleep disorder. Various pharmacological products are used to ameliorate symptoms of sleepiness or poor sleep length and quality.


#79 2016 WSES guidelines on acute calculous cholecystitis Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Ansaloni, L.; Pisano, M.; Coccolini, F.; Peitzmann, A. B.; Fingerhut, A.; Catena, F.; Agresta, F.; Allegri, A.; Bailey, I.; Balogh, Z. J.; Bendinelli, C.; Biffl, W.; Bonavina, L.; Borzellino, G.; Brunetti, F.; Burlew, C. C.; Camapanelli, G.; Campanile, F. C.; Ceresoli, M.; Chiara, O.

World Journal of Emergency Surgery Volume 11, Issue 1

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Acute calculus cholecystitis is a very common disease with several area of uncertainty. The World Society of Emergency Surgery developed extensive guidelines in order to cover grey areas. The diagnostic criteria, the antimicrobial therapy, the evaluation of associated common bile duct stones, the identification of "high risk" patients, the surgical timing, the type of surgery, and the alternatives to surgery are discussed. Moreover the algorithm is proposed: as soon as diagnosis is made and after the evaluation of choledocholitiasis risk, laparoscopic cholecystectomy should be offered to all patients exception of those with high risk of morbidity or mortality. These Guidelines must be considered as an adjunctive tool for decision but they are not substitute of the clinical judgement for the individual patient.



#81 Zika virus infection in a traveller returning from the Maldives, June 2015 Open access logo Link logo

Korhonen, E. M.; Huhtamo, E.; Smura, T.; Kallio-Kokko, H.; Raassina, M.; Vapalahti, O.

Eurosurveillance Volume 21, Issue 2

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We report a Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in a patient with fever and rash after returning to Finland from Maldives, June 2015. The patient had dengue virus (DENV) IgG and IgM antibodies but pan-flavivirus RT-PCR and subsequent sequencing showed presence of ZIKV RNA in urine. Recent association of ZIKV with microcephaly highlights the need for laboratory differentiation of ZIKV from DENV infection and the circulation of ZIKV in areas outside its currently known distribution range.


#82 Genetic Evidence for Causal Relationships Between Maternal Obesity-Related Traits and Birth Weight Link logo PDF logo

Tyrrell, Jessica; Richmond, Rebecca C.; Palmer, Tom M.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Rangarajan, Janani; Metrustry, Sarah; Cavadino, Alana; Paternoster, Lavinia; Armstrong, Loren L.; De Silva, N. Maneka G.; Wood, Andrew R.; Horikoshi, Momoko; Geller, Frank; Myhre, Ronny; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Kreiner-Moller, Eskil; Huikari, Ville; Painter, Jodie N.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Allard, Catherine

JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association Volume 315, Issue 11

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Neonates born to overweight or obese women are larger and at higher risk of birth complications. Many maternal obesity-related traits are observationally associated with birth weight, but the causal nature of these associations is uncertain. To test for genetic evidence of causal associations of maternal body mass index (BMI) and related traits with birth weight. Mendelian randomization to test whether maternal BMI and obesity-related traits are potentially causally related to offspring birth weight. Data from 30 487 women in 18 studies were analyzed. Participants were of European ancestry from population- or community-based studies in Europe, North America, or Australia and were part of the Early Growth Genetics Consortium. Live, term, singleton offspring born between 1929 and 2013 were included. Genetic scores for BMI, fasting glucose level, type 2 diabetes, systolic blood pressure (SBP), triglyceride level, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level, vitamin D status, and adiponectin level. Offspring birth weight from 18 studies. Among the 30 487 newborns the mean birth weight in the various cohorts ranged from 3325 g to 3679 g. The maternal genetic score for BMI was associated with a 2-g (95% CI, 0 to 3 g) higher offspring birth weight per maternal BMI-raising allele (P = .008). The maternal genetic scores for fasting glucose and SBP were also associated with birth weight with effect sizes of 8 g (95% CI, 6 to 10 g) per glucose-raising allele (P = 7 × 10-14) and -4 g (95% CI, -6 to -2g) per SBP-raising allele (P = 1×10-5), respectively. A 1-SD ( ≈ 4 points) genetically higher maternal BMI was associated with a 55-g higher offspring birth weight (95% CI, 17 to 93 g). A 1-SD ( ≈ 7.2 mg/dL) genetically higher maternal fasting glucose concentration was associated with 114-g higher offspring birth weight (95% CI, 80 to 147 g). However, a 1-SD ( ≈ 10 mm Hg) genetically higher maternal SBP was associated with a 208-g lower offspring birth weight (95% CI, -394 to -21 g). For BMI and fasting glucose, genetic associations were consistent with the observational associations, but for systolic blood pressure, the genetic and observational associations were in opposite directions. In this mendelian randomization study, genetically elevated maternal BMI and blood glucose levels were potentially causally associated with higher offspring birth weight, whereas genetically elevated maternal SBP was potentially causally related to lower birth weight. If replicated, these findings may have implications for counseling and managing pregnancies to avoid adverse weight-related birth outcomes.


#83 Microbes and Alzheimer's Disease Link logo PDF logo

Itzhaki, Ruth F.; Lathe, Richard; Balin, Brian J.; Ball, Melvyn J.; Bearer, Elaine L.; Braak, Heiko; Bullido, Maria J.; Carter, Chris; Clerici, Mario; Cosby, S. Louise; Del Tredici, Kelly; Field, Hugh; Fulop, Tamas; Grassi, Claudio; Griffin, W. Sue T.; Haas, Jurgen; Hudson, Alan P.; Kamer, Angela R.; Kell, Douglas B.; Licastro, Federico

Journal of Alzheimer's Disease Volume 51, Issue 4, Pages 979–984

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#84 Genome-wide study for circulating metabolites identifies 62 loci and reveals novel systemic effects of LPA Link logo

Kettunen Johannes; Demirkan Ayse; Würtz Peter; Draisma Harmen H; Haller Toomas; Rawal Rajesh; Vaarhorst Anika; Kangas Antti J; Lyytikäinen Leo-Pekka; Pirinen Matti; Pool Rene; Sarin Antti-Pekka; Soininen Pasi; Tukiainen Taru; Wang Qin; Tiainen Mika; Tynkkynen Tuulia; Amin Najef; Zeller Tanja; Beekman Marian; Deelen Joris et al

Nature Communications

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Genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci linked with complex diseases, for which the molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Comprehensive molecular profiling of circulating metabolites captures highly heritable traits, which can help to uncover metabolic pathophysiology underlying established disease variants. We conduct an extended genome-wide association study of genetic influences on 123 circulating metabolic traits quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics from up to 24,925 individuals and identify eight novel loci for amino acids, pyruvate and fatty acids. The LPA locus link with cardiovascular risk exemplifies how detailed metabolic profiling may inform underlying aetiology via extensive associations with very-low-density lipoprotein and triglyceride metabolism. Genetic fine mapping and Mendelian randomization uncover wide-spread causal effects of lipoprotein(a) on overall lipoprotein metabolism and we assess potential pleiotropic consequences of genetically elevated lipoprotein(a) on diverse morbidities via electronic health-care records. Our findings strengthen the argument for safe LPA-targeted intervention to reduce cardiovascular risk.


#85 Atlas of prostate cancer heritability in European and African-American men pinpoints tissue-specific regulation Link logo

Gusev; Alexander; Shi; Huwenbo; Kichaev; Gleb; Pomerantz; Mark; Li; Fugen; Long; Henry W.; Ingles; Sue A.; Kittles; Rick A.; Strom; Sara S.; Rybicki; Benjamin A.; Nemesure; Barbara; Isaacs; William B.; Zheng; Wei; Pettaway; Curtis A.; Yeboah; Edward D.; Tettey; Yao; Biritwum; Richard B.; Adjei; Andrew A.; Tay; Evelyn; Truelove; Ann; Niwa; Shelley; Chokkalingam; Anand P.; John; Esther M.; Murphy; Adam B.; Signorello; Lisa B.; Carpten; John; Leske; M. Cristina; Wu; Suh-Yuh; Hennis; Anslem J. M.; N

Nature Communications

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Although genome-wide association studies have identified over 100 risk loci that explain ∼33% of familial risk for prostate cancer (PrCa), their functional effects on risk remain largely unknown. Here we use genotype data from 59,089 men of European and African American ancestries combined with cell-type-specific epigenetic data to build a genomic atlas of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) heritability in PrCa. We find significant differences in heritability between variants in prostate-relevant epigenetic marks defined in normal versus tumour tissue as well as between tissue and cell lines. The majority of SNP heritability lies in regions marked by H3k27 acetylation in prostate adenoc7arcinoma cell line (LNCaP) or by DNaseI hypersensitive sites in cancer cell lines. We find a high degree of similarity between European and African American ancestries suggesting a similar genetic architecture from common variation underlying PrCa risk. Our findings showcase the power of integrating functional annotation with genetic data to understand the genetic basis of PrCa.


#86 Rare loss-of-function variants in SETD1A are associated with schizophrenia and developmental disorders Link logo PDF logo

Singh T; Kurki MI; Curtis D; Purcell SM; Crooks L; McRae J; Suvisaari J; Chheda H; Blackwood D; Breen G; Pietiläinen O; Gerety SS; Ayub M; Blyth M; Cole T; Collier D; Coomber EL; Craddock N; Daly MJ; Danesh J; et al

Neuron Volume 82, Issue 4

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Loss-of-function (LOF) (i.e., nonsense, splice site, and frameshift) variants that lead to disruption of gene function are likely to contribute to the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we perform a systematic investigation of the role of both de novo and inherited LOF variants in schizophrenia using exome sequencing data from 231 case and 34 control trios. We identify two de novo LOF variants in the SETD1A gene, which encodes a subunit of histone methyltransferase, a finding unlikely to have occurred by chance, and provide evidence for a more general role of chromatin regulators in schizophrenia risk. Transmission pattern analyses reveal that LOF variants are more likely to be transmitted to affected individuals than controls. This is especially true for private LOF variants in genes intolerant to functional genetic variation. These findings highlight the contribution of LOF mutations to the genetic architecture of schizophrenia and provide important insights into disease pathogenesis.


#87 Determinants of tobacco-related health literacy: A qualitative study with early adolescents

Parisod H; Axelin A; Smed J; Salanterä S

International Journal of Nursing Studies

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Today's adolescents are used to a constant information flow, but many face difficulties in processing health-related information due to low health literacy. There is still need for deeper understanding on the determinants of health literacy in relation to adolescents to guide the development of health literacy instruments and interventions. The purpose of this study was to explore, from the perspective of early adolescents, the determinants of health literacy in the context of tobacco-related health communication. A qualitative descriptive study. Two schools located in the south of Finland. One school represented a typical Finnish public school with students following general curriculum and the other represented a Finnish public school with students with special educational needs. Purposively selected sample of 10-13-year-old early adolescents (n=39) from the two schools to obtain a varied group of early adolescents representing different kinds of literacy levels. We conducted 10 focus groups with early adolescents and analyzed the data using the theoretical thematic analysis method. We used a combination of the determinants presented in three adolescent-specific health literacy models as the theoretical framework of deductive analysis. The remaining data extracts were coded inductively. We sorted the codes under sub-themes that represented different determinants of health literacy. These were further divided between three themes: "personal", "external", and "mediating" determinants. Finally, we named the themes with an expression that embodied the early adolescents' views and experiences. Early adolescents' descriptions revealed that the list of determinants presented in the three adolescent-specific health literacy models is not comprehensive enough. Early adolescents brought up how their motives, self-efficacy, and role expectations determine their health literacy in addition to the other personal determinants presented in the previous models. Their descriptions also suggest that external determinants include interpersonal relations with authorities, idols and random people, and the socio-cultural atmosphere as new factors. New mediating determinants that have a separate influence on health literacy were recognized based on early adolescents' descriptions as well. Our findings give a new, adolescent-oriented insight on the determinants of adolescents' health literacy. Based on the findings, there are additional personal, external, and mediating determinants that are not included in the current adolescent-specific health literacy models. These newly found determinants require attention and further exploration. The acquired knowledge can be used for strengthening existing adolescent-specific health literacy models, and as a basis of health literacy instrument and intervention development.


#88 Early microbial contact, the breast milk microbiome and child health PDF logo

Rautava S

Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease Volume 7, Issue 01, Pages 5–14

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The significance of contact with microbes in early life for subsequent health has been the subject of intense research during the last 2 decades. Disturbances in the establishment of the indigenous intestinal microbiome caused by cesarean section delivery or antibiotic exposure in early life have been linked to the risk of immune-mediated and inflammatory conditions such as atopic disorders, inflammatory bowel disease and obesity later in life. Distinct microbial populations have recently been discovered at maternal sites including the amniotic cavity and breast milk, as well as meconium, which have previously been thought to be sterile. Our understanding of the impact of fetal microbial contact on health outcomes is still rudimentary. Breast milk is known to modulate immune and metabolic programming. The breast milk microbiome is hypothesized to guide infant gut colonization and is affected by maternal health status and mode of delivery. Immunomodulatory factors in breast milk interact with the maternal and infant gut microbiome and may mediate some of the health benefits associated with breastfeeding. The intimate connection between the mother and the fetus or the infant is a potential target for microbial therapeutic interventions aiming to support healthy microbial contact and protect against disease.


#89 AMPK/Snf1 signaling regulates histone acetylation: Impact on gene expression and epigenetic functions

Salminen A; Kauppinen A; Kaarniranta K

Cellular Signalling

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AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its yeast homolog, Snf1, are critical regulators in the maintenance of energy metabolic balance not only stimulating energy production but also inhibiting energy-consuming processes. The AMPK/Snf1 signaling controls energy metabolism by specific phosphorylation of many metabolic enzymes and transcription factors, enhancing or suppressing their functions. The AMPK/Snf1 complexes can be translocated from cytoplasm into nuclei where they are involved in the regulation of transcription. Recent studies have indicated that AMPK/Snf1 activation can control histone acetylation through different mechanisms affecting not only gene transcription but also many other epigenetic functions. For instance, AMPK/Snf1 enzymes can phosphorylate the histone H3S10 (yeast) and H2BS36 (mammalian) sites which activate specific histone acetyltransferases (HAT), consequently enhancing histone acetylation. Moreover, nuclear AMPK can phosphorylate type 2A histone deacetylases (HDAC), e.g. HDAC4 and HDAC5, triggering their export from nuclei thus promoting histone acetylation reactions. AMPK activation can also increase the level of acetyl CoA, e.g. by inhibiting fatty acid and cholesterol syntheses. Acetyl CoA is a substrate for HATs, thus increasing their capacity for histone acetylation. On the other hand, AMPK can stimulate the activity of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) which increases the level of NAD(+). NAD(+) is a substrate for nuclear sirtuins, especially for SIRT1 and SIRT6, which deacetylate histones and transcription factors, e.g. those regulating ribosome synthesis and circadian clocks. Histone acetylation is an important epigenetic modification which subsequently can affect chromatin remodeling, e.g. via bromodomain proteins. We will review the signaling mechanisms of AMPK/Snf1 in the control of histone acetylation and subsequently clarify their role in the epigenetic regulation of ribosome synthesis and circadian clocks.


#90 Current disease modifying approaches to treat Parkinson's disease Link logo PDF logo

Lindholm, Dan; Mäkelä, Johanna; Di Liberto, Valentina; Mudo, Giuseppa; Belluardo, Natale; Eriksson-Rosenberg, Ove; Saarma, Mart

Cellular & Molecular Life Sciences Volume 73, Issue 7, Pages 1365–1379

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Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive neurological disorder characterized by the degeneration and death of midbrain dopamine and non-dopamine neurons in the brain leading to motor dysfunctions and other symptoms, which seriously influence the quality of life of PD patients. The drug L-dopa can alleviate the motor symptoms in PD, but so far there are no rational therapies targeting the underlying neurodegenerative processes. Despite intensive research, the molecular mechanisms causing neuronal loss are not fully understood which has hampered the development of new drugs and disease-modifying therapies. Neurotrophic factors are by virtue of their survival promoting activities attract candidates to counteract and possibly halt cell degeneration in PD. In particular, studies employing glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and its family member neurturin (NRTN), as well as the recently described cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) and the mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) have shown positive results in protecting and repairing dopaminergic neurons in various models of PD. Other substances with trophic actions in dopaminergic neurons include neuropeptides and small compounds that target different pathways impaired in PD, such as increased cell stress, protein handling defects, dysfunctional mitochondria and neuroinflammation. In this review, we will highlight the recent developments in this field with a focus on trophic factors and substances having the potential to beneficially influence the viability and functions of dopaminergic neurons as shown in preclinical or in animal models of PD.


#91 Genetic Variability Overrides the Impact of Parental Cell Type and Determines iPSC Differentiation Potential Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Kyttala, Aija; Moraghebi, Roksana; Valensisi, Cristina; Kettunen, Johannes; Andrus, Colin; Pasumarthy, Kalyan Kumar; Nakanishi, Mahito; Nishimura, Ken; Ohtaka, Manami; Weltner, Jere; Van Handel, Ben; Parkkonen, Olavi; Sinisalo, Juha; Jalanko, Anu; Hawkins, R. David; Woods, Niels-Bjarne; Otonkoski, Timo; Trokovic, Ras

Stem Cell Reports Volume 6, Issue 2, Pages 200–212

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Reports on the retention of somatic cell memory in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have complicated the selection of the optimal cell type for the generation of iPSC biobanks. To address this issue we compared transcriptomic, epigenetic, and differentiation propensities of genetically matched human iPSCs derived from fibroblasts and blood, two tissues of the most practical relevance for biobanking. Our results show that iPSC lines derived from the same donor are highly similar to each other. However, genetic variation imparts a donor-specific expression and methylation profile in reprogrammed cells that leads to variable functional capacities of iPSC lines. Our results suggest that integration-free, bona fide iPSC lines from fibroblasts and blood can be combined in repositories to form biobanks. Due to the impact of genetic variation on iPSC differentiation, biobanks should contain cells from large numbers of donors.


#92 The potential of microRNAs as prostate cancer biomarkers Link logo PDF logo

Fabris Linda; Ceder Yvonne; Chinnaiyan Arul M; Jenster Guido W; Sorensen Karina D; Tomlins Scott; Visakorpi Tapio; Calin George A

European Urology

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Short noncoding RNAs known as microRNAs (miRNAs) control protein expression through the degradation of RNA or the inhibition of protein translation. The miRNAs influence a wide range of biologic processes and are often deregulated in cancer. This family of small RNAs constitutes potentially valuable markers for the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic choices in prostate cancer (PCa) patients, as well as potential drugs (miRNA mimics) or drug targets (anti-miRNAs) in PCa management. To review the currently available data on miRNAs as biomarkers in PCa and as possible tools for early detection and prognosis. A systematic review was performed searching the PubMed database for articles in English using a combination of the following terms: microRNA, miRNA, cancer, prostate cancer, miRNA profiling, diagnosis, prognosis, therapy response, and predictive marker. We summarize the existing literature regarding the profiling of miRNA in PCa detection, prognosis, and response to therapy. The articles were reviewed with the main goal of finding a common recommendation that could be translated from bench to bedside in future clinical practice. The miRNAs are important regulators of biologic processes in PCa progression. A common expression profile characterizing each tumor subtype and stage has still not been identified for PCa, probably due to molecular heterogeneity as well as differences in study design and patient selection. Large-scale studies that should provide additional important information are still missing. Further studies, based on common clinical parameters and guidelines, are necessary to validate the translational potential of miRNAs in PCa clinical management. Such common signatures are promising in the field and emerge as potential biomarkers. The literature shows that microRNAs hold potential as novel biomarkers that could aid prostate cancer management, but additional studies with larger patient cohorts and common guidelines are necessary before clinical implementation.


#93 The Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016: children, youth, and physical activity in schools and during leisure time Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Bangsbo, Jens;Krustrup, Peter;Duda, Joan;Hillman, Charles;Andersen, Lars Bo;Weiss, Maureen;Williams, Craig A;Lintunen, Taru;Green, Ken;Hansen, Peter Riis;Naylor, Patti-Jean;Ericsson, Ingegerd;Nielsen, Glen;Froberg, Karsten;Bugge, Anna;Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper;Schipperijn, Jasper;Dagkas, Symeon;Agergaard, Sine;von Seelen, Jesper

British Journal of Sports Medicine Volume 50, Issue 19, Pages bjsports-2016-096325–1178

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From 4 to 7 April 2016, 24 researchers from 8 countries and from a variety of academic disciplines gathered in Snekkersten, Denmark, to reach evidence-based consensus about physical activity in children and youth, that is, individuals between 6 and 18 years. Physical activity is an overarching term that consists of many structured and unstructured forms within school and out-of-school-time contexts, including organised sport, physical education, outdoor recreation, motor skill development programmes, recess, and active transportation such as biking and walking. This consensus statement presents the accord on the effects of physical activity on children's and youth's fitness, health, cognitive functioning, engagement, motivation, psychological well-being and social inclusion, as well as presenting educational and physical activity implementation strategies. The consensus was obtained through an iterative process that began with presentation of the state-of-the art in each domain followed by plenary and group discussions. Ultimately, Consensus Conference participants reached agreement on the 21-item consensus statement.


#94 PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM rare variants and cancer risk:data from COGS Link logo PDF logo

Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkas, Katri; Couch, Fergus; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foulkes, William D.; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Nevanlinna, Heli; Hopper, John L.; Doerk, Thilo; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Teo, Zhi Ling; Radice, Paolo; Catucci, Irene; Peterlongo, Paolo

Journal of Medical Genetics Volume 53, Issue 12

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The rarity of mutations in PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM make it difficult to estimate precisely associated cancer risks. Population-based family studies have provided evidence that at least some of these mutations are associated with breast cancer risk as high as those associated with rare BRCA2 mutations. We aimed to estimate the relative risks associated with specific rare variants in PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM via a multicentre case-control study. We genotyped 10 rare mutations using the custom iCOGS array: PALB2 c.1592delT, c.2816T>G and c.3113G>A, CHEK2 c.349A>G, c.538C>T, c.715G>A, c.1036C>T, c.1312G>T, and c.1343T>G and ATM c.7271T>G. We assessed associations with breast cancer risk (42 671 cases and 42 164 controls), as well as prostate (22 301 cases and 22 320 controls) and ovarian (14 542 cases and 23 491 controls) cancer risk, for each variant. For European women, strong evidence of association with breast cancer risk was observed for PALB2 c.1592delT OR 3.44 (95% CI 1.39 to 8.52, p=7.1×10(-5)), PALB2 c.3113G>A OR 4.21 (95% CI 1.84 to 9.60, p=6.9×10(-8)) and ATM c.7271T>G OR 11.0 (95% CI 1.42 to 85.7, p=0.0012). We also found evidence of association with breast cancer risk for three variants in CHEK2, c.349A>G OR 2.26 (95% CI 1.29 to 3.95), c.1036C>T OR 5.06 (95% CI 1.09 to 23.5) and c.538C>T OR 1.33 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.67) (p≤0.017). Evidence for prostate cancer risk was observed for CHEK2 c.1343T>G OR 3.03 (95% CI 1.53 to 6.03, p=0.0006) for African men and CHEK2 c.1312G>T OR 2.21 (95% CI 1.06 to 4.63, p=0.030) for European men. No evidence of association with ovarian cancer was found for any of these variants. This report adds to accumulating evidence that at least some variants in these genes are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer that is clinically important.


#95 Percutaneous coronary angioplasty versus coronary artery bypass grafting in treatment of unprotected left main stenosis (NOBLE):a prospective, randomised, open-label, non-inferiority trial Link logo PDF logo

Makikallio, Timo; Holm, Niels R.; Lindsay, Mitchell; Spence, Mark S.; Erglis, Andrejs; Menown, Ian B. A.; Trovik, Thor; Eskola, Markku; Romppanen, Hannu; Kellerth, Thomas; Ravkilde, Jan; Jensen, Lisette O.; Kalinauskas, Gintaras; Linder, Rikard B. A.; Pentikainen, Markku; Hervold, Anders; Banning, Adrian; Zaman, Azfar; Cotton, Jamen; Eriksen, Erlend

The Lancet

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Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is the standard treatment for revascularisation in patients with left main coronary artery disease, but use of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for this indication is increasing. We aimed to compare PCI and CABG for treatment of left main coronary artery disease. In this prospective, randomised, open-label, non-inferiority trial, patients with left main coronary artery disease were enrolled in 36 centres in northern Europe and randomised 1:1 to treatment with PCI or CABG. Eligible patients had stable angina pectoris, unstable angina pectoris, or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Exclusion criteria were ST-elevation myocardial infarction within 24 h, being considered too high risk for CABG or PCI, or expected survival of less than 1 year. The primary endpoint was major adverse cardiac or cerebrovascular events (MACCE), a composite of all-cause mortality, non-procedural myocardial infarction, any repeat coronary revascularisation, and stroke. Non-inferiority of PCI to CABG required the lower end of the 95% CI not to exceed a hazard ratio (HR) of 1·35 after up to 5 years of follow-up. The intention-to-treat principle was used in the analysis if not specified otherwise. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov identifier, number NCT01496651. Between Dec 9, 2008, and Jan 21, 2015, 1201 patients were randomly assigned, 598 to PCI and 603 to CABG, and 592 in each group entered analysis by intention to treat. Kaplan-Meier 5 year estimates of MACCE were 29% for PCI (121 events) and 19% for CABG (81 events), HR 1·48 (95% CI 1·11-1·96), exceeding the limit for non-inferiority, and CABG was significantly better than PCI (p=0·0066). As-treated estimates were 28% versus 19% (1·55, 1·18-2·04, p=0·0015). Comparing PCI with CABG, 5 year estimates were 12% versus 9% (1·07, 0·67-1·72, p=0·77) for all-cause mortality, 7% versus 2% (2·88, 1·40-5·90, p=0·0040) for non-procedural myocardial infarction, 16% versus 10% (1·50, 1·04-2·17, p=0·032) for any revascularisation, and 5% versus 2% (2·25, 0·93-5·48, p=0·073) for stroke. The findings of this study suggest that CABG might be better than PCI for treatment of left main stem coronary artery disease. Biosensors, Aarhus University Hospital, and participating sites.


#96 Differences and similarities of risk factors for suicidal ideation and attempts among patients with depressive or bipolar disorders Link logo PDF logo

Aaltonen, Kari; Naatanen, Petri; Heikkinen, Martti; Koivisto, Maaria; Baryshnikoy, Ilya; Karpov, Boris; Oksanen, Jorma; Melartin, Tarja; Suominen, Kirsi; Joffe, Grigori; Paunio, Tiina; Isometsa, Erkki

Journal of Affective Disorders

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Substantial literature exists on risk factors for suicidal behaviour. However, their comparative strength, independence and specificity for either suicidal ideation or suicide attempt(s) remain unclear. The Helsinki University Psychiatric Consortium (HUPC) Study surveyed 287 psychiatric care patients with ICD-10-DCR depressive or bipolar disorders about lifetime suicidal behaviour, developmental history and attachment style, personality and psychological traits, current and lifetime symptom profiles, and life events. Psychiatric records were used to confirm diagnosis and complement information on suicide attempts. Multinomial regression models predicting lifetime suicidal ideation and single or repeated suicide attempts were generated. Overall, 21.6% patients had no lifetime suicidal behaviour, 33.8% had lifetime suicide ideation without attempts, and 17.1% had a single and 27.5% repeated suicide attempts. In univariate analyses, lifetime suicidal behaviour was associated with numerous factors. In multivariate models, suicidal ideation was independently predicted by younger age, severe depressive disorder, bipolar disorder type II/nos, hopelessness, and childhood physical abuse. Repeated suicide attempts were independently predicted by younger age, female sex, severe depressive disorder with or without psychotic symptoms, bipolar disorder type II/nos, alcohol use disorder, borderline personality disorder traits, and childhood physical abuse. Cross-sectional and retrospective study design, utilization of clinical diagnoses, and relatively low response rate. Risk factors for suicidal ideation and attempts may diverge both qualitatively and in terms of dose response. When effects of risk factors from multiple domains are concurrently examined, proximal clinical characteristics remain the most robust. All risk factors cluster into the group of repeated attempters.


#97 Genome-wide meta-analysis uncovers novel loci influencing circulating leptin levels Link logo

Kilpeläinen Tuomas O; Carli Jayne F; Skowronski Alicja A; Sun Qi; Kriebel Jennifer; Feitosa Mary F; Hedman Åsa K; Drong Alexander W; Hayes James E; Zhao Jinghua; Pers Tune H; Schick Ursula; Grarup Niels; Kutalik Zoltan; Trompet Stella; Mangino Massimo; Kristiansson Kati; Beekman Marian; Lyytikäinen Leo-Pekka; Eriksson Joel et al

Nature Communications

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Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone, the circulating levels of which correlate closely with overall adiposity. Although rare mutations in the leptin (LEP) gene are well known to cause leptin deficiency and severe obesity, no common loci regulating circulating leptin levels have been uncovered. Therefore, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of circulating leptin levels from 32,161 individuals and followed up loci reaching P<10(-6) in 19,979 additional individuals. We identify five loci robustly associated (P<5 × 10(-8)) with leptin levels in/near LEP, SLC32A1, GCKR, CCNL1 and FTO. Although the association of the FTO obesity locus with leptin levels is abolished by adjustment for BMI, associations of the four other loci are independent of adiposity. The GCKR locus was found associated with multiple metabolic traits in previous GWAS and the CCNL1 locus with birth weight. Knockdown experiments in mouse adipose tissue explants show convincing evidence for adipogenin, a regulator of adipocyte differentiation, as the novel causal gene in the SLC32A1 locus influencing leptin levels. Our findings provide novel insights into the regulation of leptin production by adipose tissue and open new avenues for examining the influence of variation in leptin levels on adiposity and metabolic health.


#98 Capturing tumor complexity in vitro:Comparative analysis of 2D and 3D tumor models for drug discovery Open access logo Link logo

Stock, Kristin; Estrada, Marta F.; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; Rudisch, Albin; Santo, Vitor E.; Barbier, Michael; Blom, Sami; Arundkar, Sharath C.; Selvam, Irwin; Osswald, Annika; Stein, Yan; Gruenewald, Sylvia; Brito, Catarina; van Weerden, Wytske; Rotter, Varda; Boghaert, Erwin; Oren, Moshe; Sommergruber, Wolfgang; Chong, Yolanda

Scientific Reports

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Two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures growing on plastic do not recapitulate the three dimensional (3D) architecture and complexity of human tumors. More representative models are required for drug discovery and validation. Here, 2D culture and 3D mono- and stromal co-culture models of increasing complexity have been established and cross-comparisons made using three standard cell carcinoma lines: MCF7, LNCaP, NCI-H1437. Fluorescence-based growth curves, 3D image analysis, immunohistochemistry and treatment responses showed that end points differed according to cell type, stromal co-culture and culture format. The adaptable methodologies described here should guide the choice of appropriate simple and complex in vitro models.


#99 Normal stroma suppresses cancer cell proliferation via mechanosensitive regulation of JMJD1a-mediated transcription Link logo

Kaukonen Riina; Mai Anja; Georgiadou Maria; Saari Markku; De Franceschi Nicola; Betz Timo; Sihto Harri; Ventelä Sami; Elo Laura; Jokitalo Eija; Westermarck Jukka; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen Pirkko-Liisa; Joensuu Heikki; Grenman Reidar; Ivaska Johanna

Nature Communications

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Tissue homeostasis is dependent on the controlled localization of specific cell types and the correct composition of the extracellular stroma. While the role of the cancer stroma in tumour progression has been well characterized, the specific contribution of the matrix itself is unknown. Furthermore, the mechanisms enabling normal-not cancer-stroma to provide tumour-suppressive signals and act as an antitumorigenic barrier are poorly understood. Here we show that extracellular matrix (ECM) generated by normal fibroblasts (NFs) is softer than the CAF matrix, and its physical and structural features regulate cancer cell proliferation. We find that normal ECM triggers downregulation and nuclear exit of the histone demethylase JMJD1a resulting in the epigenetic growth restriction of carcinoma cells. Interestingly, JMJD1a positively regulates transcription of many target genes, including YAP/TAZ (WWTR1), and therefore gene expression in a stiffness-dependent manner. Thus, normal stromal restricts cancer cell proliferation through JMJD1a-dependent modulation of gene expression.


#100 Proportion of children meeting recommendations for 24-hour movement guidelines and associations with adiposity in a 12-country study Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Roman-Vinas, Blanca; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Fogelholm, Mikael; Lambert, Estelle V.; Maher, Carol; Maia, Jose; Olds, Timothy; Onywera, Vincent; Sarmiento, Olga L.; Standage, Martyn; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Tremblay, Mark S.; ,

International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Volume 13, Issue 1

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The Canadian 24-h movement guidelines were developed with the hope of improving health and future health outcomes in children and youth. The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence to the 3 recommendations most strongly associated with health outcomes in new 24-h movement guidelines and their relationship with adiposity (obesity and body mass index z-score) across countries participating in the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE). Cross-sectional results were based on 6128 children aged 9-11 years from the 12 countries of ISCOLE. Sleep duration and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were assessed using accelerometry. Screen time was measured through self-report. Body weight and height were measured. Body mass index (BMI, kg · m(-2)) was calculated, and BMI z-scores were computed using age- and sex-specific reference data from the World Health Organization. Obesity was defined as a BMI z-score > +2 SD. Meeting the overall 24-h movement guidelines was defined as: 9 to 11 h/night of sleep, ≤2 h/day of screen time, and at least 60 min/day of MVPA. Age, sex, highest parental education and unhealthy diet pattern score were included as covariates in statistical models. Associations between meeting vs. not meeting each single recommendation (and combinations) with obesity were assessed with odds ratios calculated using generalized linear mixed models. A linear mixed model was used to examine the differences in BMI z-scores between children meeting vs. not meeting the different combinations of recommendations. The global prevalence of children meeting the overall recommendations (all three behaviors) was 7%, with children from Australia and Canada showing the highest adherence (15%). Children meeting the three recommendations had lower odds ratios for obesity compared to those meeting none of the recommendations (OR = 0.28, 95% CI 0.18-0.45). Compared to not meeting the 24-h movement recommendations either independently or combined, meeting them was significantly associated with a lower BMI z-score. Whenever the MVPA recommendation was included in the analysis the odds ratios for obesity were lower. For ISCOLE participants meeting these 3 healthy movement recommendations the odds ratios of being obese or having high BMI z-scores were lower. However, only a small percentage of children met all recommendations. Future efforts should aim to find promising ways to increase daily physical activity, reduce screen time, and ensure an adequate night's sleep in children. The International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE) was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier NCT01722500) (October 29, 2012).


#101 Mitochondrial DNA Replication Defects Disturb Cellular dNTP Pools and Remodel One-Carbon Metabolism Link logo PDF logo

Nikkanen, Joni; Forsstrom, Saara; Euro, Liliya; Paetau, Ilse; Kohnz, Rebecca A.; Wang, Liya; Chilov, Dmitri; Viinamaki, Jenni; Roivainen, Anne; Marjamaki, Paivi; Liljenback, Heidi; Ahola, Sofia; Buzkova, Jana; Terzioglu, Mugen; Khan, Nahid A.; Pirnes-Karhu, Sini; Paetau, Anders; Lonnqvist, Tuula; Sajantila, Antti; Isohanni, Pirjo

Cell Metabolism (Science Direct) Volume 23, Issue 4

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Mitochondrial dysfunction affects cellular energy metabolism, but less is known about the consequences for cytoplasmic biosynthetic reactions. We report that mtDNA replication disorders caused by TWINKLE mutations-mitochondrial myopathy (MM) and infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA)-remodel cellular dNTP pools in mice. MM muscle shows tissue-specific induction of the mitochondrial folate cycle, purine metabolism, and imbalanced and increased dNTP pools, consistent with progressive mtDNA mutagenesis. IOSCA-TWINKLE is predicted to hydrolyze dNTPs, consistent with low dNTP pools and mtDNA depletion in the disease. MM muscle also modifies the cytoplasmic one-carbon cycle, transsulfuration, and methylation, as well as increases glucose uptake and its utilization for de novo serine and glutathione biosynthesis. Our evidence indicates that the mitochondrial replication machinery communicates with cytoplasmic dNTP pools and that upregulation of glutathione synthesis through glucose-driven de novo serine biosynthesis contributes to the metabolic stress response. These results are important for disorders with primary or secondary mtDNA instability and offer targets for metabolic therapy.


#102 Blood-based biomarkers of age-associated epigenetic changes in human islets associate with insulin secretion and diabetes Open access logo Link logo

Bacos, Karl; Gillberg, Linn; Volkov, Petr; Olsson, Anders H.; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Eiberg, Hans; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Almgren, Peter; Groop, Leif; Eliasson, Lena; Vaag, Allan; Dayeh, Tasnim; Ling, Charlotte

Nature Communications

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Aging associates with impaired pancreatic islet function and increased type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. Here we examine whether age-related epigenetic changes affect human islet function and if blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect these changes and associate with future T2D. We analyse DNA methylation genome-wide in islets from 87 non-diabetic donors, aged 26-74 years. Aging associates with increased DNA methylation of 241 sites. These sites cover loci previously associated with T2D, for example, KLF14. Blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect age-related methylation changes in 83 genes identified in human islets (for example, KLF14, FHL2, ZNF518B and FAM123C) and some associate with insulin secretion and T2D. DNA methylation correlates with islet expression of multiple genes, including FHL2, ZNF518B, GNPNAT1 and HLTF. Silencing these genes in β-cells alter insulin secretion. Together, we demonstrate that blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect age-related DNA methylation changes in human islets, and associate with insulin secretion in vivo and T2D.


#103 Meta-analysis of antibiotics versus appendicectomy for non-perforated acute appendicitis Link logo PDF logo

Sallinen, V.; Akl, E. A.; You, J. J.; Agarwal, A.; Shoucair, S.; Vandvik, P. O.; Agoritsas, T.; Heels-Ansdell, D.; Guyatt, G. H.; Tikkinen, Kari

British Journal of Surgery Volume 103, Issue 6, Pages 656–667

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For more than a century, appendicectomy has been the treatment of choice for appendicitis. Recent trials have challenged this view. This study assessed the benefits and harms of antibiotic therapy compared with appendicectomy in patients with non-perforated appendicitis. A comprehensive search was conducted for randomized trials comparing antibiotic therapy with appendicectomy in patients with non-perforated appendicitis. Key outcomes were analysed using random-effects meta-analysis, and the quality of evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Five studies including 1116 patients reported major complications in 25 (4·9 per cent) of 510 patients in the antibiotic and 41 (8·4 per cent) of 489 in the appendicectomy group: risk difference -2·6 (95 per cent c.i. -6·3 to 1·1) per cent (low-quality evidence). Minor complications occurred in 11 (2·2 per cent) of 510 and 61 (12·5 per cent) of 489 patients respectively: risk difference -7·2 (-18·1 to 3·8) per cent (very low-quality evidence). Of 550 patients in the antibiotic group, 47 underwent appendicectomy within 1 month: pooled estimate 8·2 (95 per cent c.i. 5·2 to 11·8) per cent (high-quality evidence). Within 1 year, appendicitis recurred in 114 of 510 patients in the antibiotic group: pooled estimate 22·6 (15·6 to 30·4) per cent (high-quality evidence). For every 100 patients with non-perforated appendicitis, initial antibiotic therapy compared with prompt appendicectomy may result in 92 fewer patients receiving surgery within the first month, and 23 more experiencing recurrent appendicitis within the first year. The choice of medical versus surgical management in patients with clearly uncomplicated appendicitis is value- and preference-dependent, suggesting a change in practice towards shared decision-making is necessary.


#104 Physiological changes in pregnancy Link logo

Soma-Pillay, Priya; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Tolppanen, Heli; Mebazaa, Alexandre

Cardiovascular journal of Africa Volume 27, Issue 2, Pages 89–94

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Physiological changes occur in pregnancy to nurture the developing foetus and prepare the mother for labour and delivery. Some of these changes influence normal biochemical values while others may mimic symptoms of medical disease. It is important to differentiate between normal physiological changes and disease pathology. This review highlights the important changes that take place during normal pregnancy.


#105 Triceps surae muscle-tendon properties in older endurance- and sprint-trained athletes Link logo PDF logo

Stenroth, Lauri;Cronin, Neil;Peltonen, Jussi;Korhonen, Marko;Sipilä, Sarianna;Finni Juutinen, Taija

Journal of Applied Physiology Volume 120, Issue 1, Pages 63–69

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Previous studies have shown that aging is associated with alterations in muscle architecture and tendon properties. However, the possible influence of different types of regular exercise loading on muscle architecture and tendon properties in older adults is poorly understood. To address this, triceps surae muscle-tendon properties were examined in older male endurance (OE, n=10, age=74.0±2.8) and sprint runners (OS, n=10, age=74.4±2.8) with an average of 42 years of regular training experience, and compared to age-matched (OC, n=33, age=74.8±3.6) and young untrained controls (YC, n=18, age=23.7±2.0). Compared to YC, Achilles tendon cross-sectional area (CSA) was 22% (p=0.022), 45 % (p=0.001) and 71% (p<0.001) larger in OC, OE and OS, respectively. Among older groups, OS had significantly larger tendon CSA compared to OC (p=0.033). No significant between-group differences were observed in Achilles tendon stiffness. In older groups, Young's modulus was 31-44% and maximal tendon stress 44-55% lower than in YC (p≤0.001). OE showed shorter soleus fascicle length than both OC (p<0.05) and YC (p<0.05). These data suggest that long-term running does not counteract the previously reported age-related increase in tendon CSA, but instead, may have an additive effect. The greatest Achilles tendon CSA was observed in sprinters followed by endurance runners and older controls, suggesting that adaptation to running exercise is loading intensity dependent. Achilles tendon stiffness was maintained in older groups even though all older groups displayed larger tendon CSA and lower tendon Young's modulus. Shorter soleus muscle fascicles in older endurance runners may be an adaptation to life-long endurance running.


#106 The gut microbiota plays a protective role in the host defence against pneumococcal pneumonia Link logo PDF logo

Schuijt, Tim J.; Lankelma, Jacqueline M.; Scicluna, Brendon P.; e Melo, Felipe de Sousa; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; de Boer, J. Daan; Hoogendijk, Arjan J.; de Beer, Regina; de Vos, Alex; Belzer, Clara; de Vos, Willem M.; van der Poll, Tom; Wiersinga, W. Joost

Gut Volume 65, Issue 4

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Pneumonia accounts for more deaths than any other infectious disease worldwide. The intestinal microbiota supports local mucosal immunity and is increasingly recognised as an important modulator of the systemic immune system. The precise role of the gut microbiota in bacterial pneumonia, however, is unknown. Here, we investigate the function of the gut microbiota in the host defence against Streptococcus pneumoniae infections. We depleted the gut microbiota in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently infected them intranasally with S. pneumoniae. We then performed survival and faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) experiments and measured parameters of inflammation and alveolar macrophage whole-genome responses. We found that the gut microbiota protects the host during pneumococcal pneumonia, as reflected by increased bacterial dissemination, inflammation, organ damage and mortality in microbiota-depleted mice compared with controls. FMT in gut microbiota-depleted mice led to a normalisation of pulmonary bacterial counts and tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 levels 6 h after pneumococcal infection. Whole-genome mapping of alveolar macrophages showed upregulation of metabolic pathways in the absence of a healthy gut microbiota. This upregulation correlated with an altered cellular responsiveness, reflected by a reduced responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid. Compared with controls, alveolar macrophages derived from gut microbiota-depleted mice showed a diminished capacity to phagocytose S. pneumoniae. This study identifies the intestinal microbiota as a protective mediator during pneumococcal pneumonia. The gut microbiota enhances primary alveolar macrophage function. Novel therapeutic strategies could exploit the gut-lung axis in bacterial infections.


#107 Effects of Self-Management Groups for People with Dementia and Their Spouses--Randomized Controlled Trial PDF logo

Laakkonen M; Kautiainen H; Hölttä E; Savikko N; Tilvis RS; Strandberg TE; Pitkälä KH

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Volume 64, Issue 4, Pages 752–760

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To investigate the effect of self-management group rehabilitation for persons with dementia (PwD) and their spouses on their health-related quality of life (HRQoL), the cognition of the PwD, and the costs of health and social services. A randomized controlled trial. Primary care and memory clinics in the Helsinki metropolitan area, Finland. PwD (N = 136) and their spouses (N = 136). Couples were randomized to usual care or eight-session self-management groups for PwD and concurrently for their spouses. Sessions aim to enhance self-efficacy and problem-solving skills and to provide peer support. The primary outcome measures were the HRQoL of PwD (measured using a generic, comprehensive (15-dimensional), self-administered instrument (15D)) and spouses (measured using the RAND-36) and the spousal Sense of Competence Questionnaire (SCQ). Secondary outcome measures were PwD cognition (Verbal Fluency (VF), Clock Drawing Test (CDT)) and costs of health and social services during 24 months. At 3 months, the spouse physical component of the RAND-36 improved (mean change 1.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) = -0.5 to 2.4) for those undergoing the intervention and worsened for controls (mean change -2.0, 95% CI = -3.5 to -0.4) (P = .006 adjusted for age, sex, baseline value of the physical component of the RAND-36). There were no differences between the groups on the mental component of the RAND-36, the SCQ, or the 15D. At 9 months, PwD change in VF was -0.38 (95% CI = -1.03 to 0.27) in intervention group and -1.60 (95% CI = -2.26 to -0.94) for controls (P = .011 adjusted for age, sex, baseline MMSE score). CDT changes were similar to VF changes. Differences in incremental costs between the groups was -436 € per person per year (95% CI = -4,986 to 4,115) for PwD (P = .35 adjusted for age, CDR) and -896 € per person per year (95% CI = -3,657 to 1,864) for spouses (P = .51 adjusted for PwD age, CDR). The intervention had beneficial effects on the HRQoL of spouses and the cognitive function of PwD without increasing total costs. anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12611001173987.


#108 Advances in Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Applications of Functional Bacterial Cellulose-Based Nanocomposites Link logo

Ullah, Hanif ; Wahid, Fazli ; Almeida Santos, Helder; Khan, Taous

Carbohydrate Polymers

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Bacterial cellulose (BC) synthesized by certain species of bacteria, is a fascinating biopolymer with unique physical and mechanical properties. BC's applications range from traditional dessert, gelling, stabilizing and thickening agent in the food industry to advanced high-tech applications, such as immobilization of enzymes, bacteria and fungi, tissue engineering, heart valve prosthesis, artificial blood vessels, bone, cartilage, cornea and skin, and dental root treatment. Various BC-composites have been designed and investigated in order to enhance its biological applicability. This review focuses on the application of BC-based composites for microbial control, wound dressing, cardiovascular, ophthalmic, skeletal, and endodontics systems. Moreover, applications in controlled drug delivery, biosensors/bioanalysis, immobilization of enzymes and cells, stem cell therapy and skin tissue repair are also highlighted. This review will provide new insights for academia and industry to further assess the BC-based composites in terms of practical applications and future commercialization for biomedical and pharmaceutical purposes.


#109 Maternal Stress During Pregnancy and Offspring Depression PDF logo

Sourander A

Depression & Anxiety (1091-4269) Volume 32, Issue 2, Pages 82–90

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Prenatal maternal depressive, anxious, and stress symptoms have been found to be associated with child and adolescent behavior problems. In this paper, we investigate their impact on behavior problems and depressive symptoms in adulthood.


#110 Restricting volumes of resuscitation fluid in adults with septic shock after initial management:the CLASSIC randomised, parallel-group, multicentre feasibility trial Link logo PDF logo

Hjortrup, Peter B.; Haase, Nicolai; Bundgaard, Helle; Thomsen, Simon L.; Winding, Robert; Pettilä, Ville; Aaen, Anne; Lodahl, David; Berthelsen, Rasmus E.; Christensen, Henrik; Madsen, Martin B.; Winkel, Per; Wetterslev, Jorn; Perner, Anders; , ; ,

Intensive Care Medicine Volume 42, Issue 11

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We assessed the effects of a protocol restricting resuscitation fluid vs. a standard care protocol after initial resuscitation in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with septic shock. We randomised 151 adult patients with septic shock who had received initial fluid resuscitation in nine Scandinavian ICUs. In the fluid restriction group fluid boluses were permitted only if signs of severe hypoperfusion occurred, while in the standard care group fluid boluses were permitted as long as circulation continued to improve. The co-primary outcome measures, resuscitation fluid volumes at day 5 and during ICU stay, were lower in the fluid restriction group than in the standard care group [mean differences -1.2 L (95 % confidence interval -2.0 to -0.4); p < 0.001 and -1.4 L (-2.4 to -0.4) respectively; p < 0.001]. Neither total fluid inputs and balances nor serious adverse reactions differed statistically significantly between the groups. Major protocol violations occurred in 27/75 patients in the fluid restriction group. Ischaemic events occurred in 3/75 in the fluid restriction group vs. 9/76 in the standard care group (odds ratio 0.32; 0.08-1.27; p = 0.11), worsening of acute kidney injury in 27/73 vs. 39/72 (0.46; 0.23-0.92; p = 0.03), and death by 90 days in 25/75 vs. 31/76 (0.71; 0.36-1.40; p = 0.32). A protocol restricting resuscitation fluid successfully reduced volumes of resuscitation fluid compared with a standard care protocol in adult ICU patients with septic shock. The patient-centred outcomes all pointed towards benefit with fluid restriction, but our trial was not powered to show differences in these exploratory outcomes. NCT02079402.


#111 Risperidone versus other atypical antipsychotic medication for schizophrenia (Withdrawn Paper. 2016, art. no. CD002306) Link logo

Gilbody, Simon; Bagnall, Anne-Marie; Duggan, Lorna; Tuunainen, Arja

Cochrane database of systematic reviews

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Risperidone is one of a number of 'atypical antipsychotics' which are currently being marketed for the treatment of those with schizophrenia, largely on the basis of claims of improved tolerability and effectiveness compared to much cheaper conventional antipsychotics. The efficacy of risperidone has already been compared to conventional drugs, but it remains unclear how risperidone compares with other atypical antipsychotic drugs such as clozapine. To determine the effects of risperidone compared with other atypical antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia. Electronic searches of Biological Abstracts (1980-1999), The Cochrane Library (Issue 1, 2000), The Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Register (January 1999), EMBASE (1980-1999), MEDLINE (1966-1999), LILACS (1982-1999), PSYNDEX (1977-1999) and PsycLIT (1974-1999) were undertaken. In addition, pharmaceutical databases on the Dialog Corporation Datastar and Dialog services were searched. References of all identified studies were searched for further trials. Pharmaceutical companies and authors of trials were contacted. All randomised controlled clinical trials that compared risperidone to other atypical antipsychotic treatments for schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses were included by independent assessment. Citations and, where possible, abstracts were independently inspected by reviewers, papers ordered, re-inspected and quality assessed. Data were independently extracted. For homogeneous dichotomous data the risk ratio (RR), 95% confidence interval (CI) and, where appropriate, the number needed to treat (NNT) were calculated on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, standardised and weighted mean differences were calculated (SMD, WMD). All data were inspected for heterogeneity. Nine studies were obtained, comparing risperidone with clozapine (five studies - largely amongst treatment resistant patients); olanzapine (three studies); and amisulpiride (one study). The research was beset by problems of high attrition rates and short term follow up.Clozapine does seem equally acceptable to risperidone in the short term (leaving the study early, n=466, RR 1.00 CI 0.73-1.37). For most other outcomes wide confidence intervals were obtained, which meant that it was impossible to judge whether the two compounds were equally effective, or whether one was in fact superior to the other.Olanzapine and risperidone seem broadly similar according to numbers of patients responding to treatment (40% reduction in PANSS scores: n=339, RR 1.14, CI 0.99-1.32). Olanzapine caused fewer people to leave the study early (n=404, RR 1.31 CI 1.06-1.60; NNT 8 CI 4-32) and fewer extrapyramidal side effects (n=339, RR 1.67 CI 1.14-2.46; NNH 8 CI 5-33), although comparative doses of risperidone were higher than those recommended in practice.In one single study (n=228) amisulpiride seemed broadly similar to risperidone in most respects.There were no useful data presented relating to service use and costs. Very few data relating to quality of life were presented. The equivalence of clozapine and risperidone for treatment resistant schizophrenia cannot yet be assumed and there seems to be little to chose between risperidone and both olanzapine and amisulpiride. The research is limited in many respects, and longer term studies measuring clinically important outcomes, including service use and quality of life are needed to judge the comparative value of the various atypical drugs.


#112 Genome-wide association study of lifetime cannabis use based on a large meta-analytic sample of 32 330 subjects from the International Cannabis Consortium Open access logo PDF logo

Stringer S, Minica CC, Verweij KJH, Mbarek H, Bernard M, Derringer J, van Eijk KR, Isen JD, Loukola A, Maciejewski DF, Mihailov E, van der Most PJ, Sanchez-Mora C, Roos L, Sherva R, Walters R, Ware JJ, Abdellaoui A, Bigdeli TB, Branje S J T et al.

BMC Psychiatry Volume 14, Issue 1

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#113 Antibiotics, obesity and the link to microbes - what are we doing to our children? Open access logo PDF logo

Turta O, Rautava S

BMC Medicine Volume 14, Issue 1

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Childhood obesity and overweight are among the greatest health challenges in the pediatric population. Obese individuals exhibit marked differences in the composition of the intestinal microbial community as compared to lean subjects. These changes in the gut microbiota precede the clinical manifestation of overweight. Convincing experimental data suggest a causal role for intestinal microbes in the development of obesity and associated metabolic disorders. Exposure to antibiotics exerts a devastating impact on the intestinal microbial community. Epidemiological studies have provided evidence indicating that early or repeated childhood exposure to antibiotics is associated with increased risk of overweight later in childhood but the causal role of this exposure in obesity development is not clear. However, data from studies conducted using experimental animal models indicate that antibiotic-induced changes in the gut microbiota influence host metabolism and lead to fat accumulation. The intestinal microbiota perturbation caused by antibiotic exposure in the perinatal period appears to program the host to an obesity-prone metabolic phenotype, which persists after the antibiotics have been discontinued and the gut microbiota has recovered. These observations may have serious implications in the clinical setting, since a substantial number of human infants are subjected to antibiotic treatment through the mother during delivery or directly in the immediate neonatal period. The clinical significance of these exposures remains unknown. Prudent use of antibiotics is paramount not only to reduce the propagation of antibiotic-resistant organisms but also to minimize the potentially detrimental long-term metabolic consequences of early antibiotic exposure. Improved means of reliably detecting neonates with bacterial infection would reduce the need for empirical antibiotic exposure initiated based on nonspecific symptoms and signs or risk factors. Finally, means to support healthy microbial contact in neonates and infants requiring antibiotic treatment are needed.


#114 A medical-toxicological view of tattooing Link logo PDF logo

Laux, Peter; Tralau, Tewes; Tentschert, Jutta; Blume, Annegret; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Baeumler, Wolfgang; Bernstein, Eric; Bocca, Beatrice; Alimonti, Alessandro; Colebrook, Helen; de Cuyper, Christa; Daehne, Lars; Hauri, Urs; Howard, Paul C.; Janssen, Paul; Katz, Linda; Klitzman, Bruce; Kluger, Nicolas; Krutak, Lars; Platzek, Thomas

The Lancet Volume 387, Issue 10016, Pages 395–402

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Long perceived as a form of exotic self-expression in some social fringe groups, tattoos have left their maverick image behind and become mainstream, particularly for young people. Historically, tattoo-related health and safety regulations have focused on rules of hygiene and prevention of infections. Meanwhile, the increasing popularity of tattooing has led to the development of many new colours, allowing tattoos to be more spectacular than ever before. However, little is known about the toxicological risks of the ingredients used. For risk assessment, safe intradermal application of these pigments needs data for toxicity and biokinetics and increased knowledge about the removal of tattoos. Other concerns are the potential for phototoxicity, substance migration, and the possible metabolic conversion of tattoo ink ingredients into toxic substances. Similar considerations apply to cleavage products that are formed during laser-assisted tattoo removal. In this Review, we summarise the issues of concern, putting them into context, and provide perspectives for the assessment of the acute and chronic health effects associated with tattooing.


#115 Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3:Area 5) Link logo PDF logo

Bousquet, J.; Farrell, J.; Crooks, G.; Hellings, P.; Bel, E. H.; Bewick, M.; Chavannes, N. H.; de Sousa, J. Correia; Cruz, A. A.; Haahtela, T.; Joos, G.; Khaltaev, N.; Malva, J.; Muraro, A.; Nogues, M.; Palkonen, S.; Pedersen, S.; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Samolinski, B.; Strandberg, T.

Clinical and Translational Allergy Volume 6, Issue 1

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Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS integrated care pathways (ICPs), (2) the joint initiative between the Reference site MACVIA-LR (Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif) and ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma), (3) Commitments for Action to the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing and the AIRWAYS ICPs network. It is deployed in collaboration with the World Health Organization Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD). The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing has proposed a 5-step framework for developing an individual scaling up strategy: (1) what to scale up: (1-a) databases of good practices, (1-b) assessment of viability of the scaling up of good practices, (1-c) classification of good practices for local replication and (2) how to scale up: (2-a) facilitating partnerships for scaling up, (2-b) implementation of key success factors and lessons learnt, including emerging technologies for individualised and predictive medicine. This strategy has already been applied to the chronic respiratory disease action plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing.


#116 A Decade of Active Surveillance in the PRIAS Study: An Update and Evaluation of the Criteria Used to Recommend a Switch to Active Treatment. Link logo PDF logo

Bokhorst LP; Valdagni R; Rannikko A; et al; Prias STUDY Group; Isotalo T; Leskinen M; Tammela T

European Urology Volume 70, Issue 6, Pages 954–960

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The Prostate Cancer Research International Active Surveillance (PRIAS) study was initiated a decade ago to study the most optimal selection and follow-up of men on active surveillance (AS). We report on 10 yr of follow-up of men on AS in the PRIAS study and evaluate if criteria used to recommend a switch to active treatment truly predict unfavorable outcome on subsequent radical prostatectomy (RP). Men with low-risk prostate cancer were included and followed prospectively on AS. Follow-up consisted of regular prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, digital rectal examinations, and biopsies. Men with Gleason >3+3, more than two positive biopsy cores, or stage higher than cT2 were advised to switch to active treatment (until 2014, a PSA doubling time [PSA DT] of 0-3 yr was also used). Reclassification rates, treatment after discontinuation, and outcome on RP after discontinuing AS were reported. Regression analysis on the outcome of RP was used to evaluate the predictive value of criteria currently used to recommend a switch to active treatment. Kaplan-Meier and competing risk analysis were used to report discontinuation rates over time and long-term oncologic end points. A total of 5302 men were included in PRIAS across 18 countries. Reclassification rates remained stable on all subsequent biopsies, with 22-33% of men having either Gleason >3+3 or more than two positive cores on any repeat biopsy. At 5 and 10 yr of follow-up, 52% and 73% of men, respectively, had discontinued AS, most of them because of protocol-based reclassification. A third of men undergoing subsequent RP had favorable pathologic tumor features (Gleason 3+3 and pT2). Of the criteria used to recommend a switch to active treatment, more than two positive cores and a PSA DT of 0-3 yr were not predictive of unfavorable pathologic outcome on RP. A substantial group of men discontinued AS without subsequent unfavorable tumor features on RP; therefore, we propose Gleason upgrading and cT3 as the only indicators for an immediate switch to active treatment. Surrogate indicators (eg, more than two positive cores and a fast-rising PSA) should not trigger immediate active treatment but rather further investigation to confirm the suspicion of higher risk disease. We confirmed the safety of active surveillance as a treatment option for men with low-risk prostate cancer; however, some changes could be made to the follow-up protocol to safely increase the number of men who remain on active surveillance.


#117 The genetic basis of undiagnosed muscular dystrophies and myopathies: results from 504 patients Link logo

Savarese M; Di Fruscio D; Torella A; Et AL; Udd B

Neurologic clinics Volume 31, Issue 4

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With advances in the genetics of muscle disease, the term, muscular dystrophy, has expanded to include mutations in an increasing large list of genes. This review discusses the genetics, pathophysiology, and potential treatments of the most common forms of muscular dystrophy: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Becker muscular dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, and myotonic dystrophy. Other forms of muscular dystrophy and other genetic muscle disorders are also discussed to provide an overview of this complex clinical problem.


#118 Ultra-rare disruptive and damaging mutations influence educational attainment in the general population Link logo

Ganna, Andrea; Genovese, Giulio; Howrigan, Daniel P.; Byrnes, Andrea; Kurki, Mitja I.; Zekavat, Seyedeh M.; Whelan, Christopher W.; Kals, Mart; Nivard, Michel G.; Bloemendal, Alex; Bloom, Jonathan M.; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Poterba, Timothy; Seed, Cotton; Handsaker, Robert E.; Natarajan, Pradeep; Magi, Reedik; Gage, Diane; Robinson, Elise B.; Metspalu, Andres

Nature Neuroscience Volume 19, Issue 12, Pages 1563–1565

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Disruptive, damaging ultra-rare variants in highly constrained genes are enriched in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders. In the general population, this class of variants was associated with a decrease in years of education (YOE). This effect was stronger among highly brain-expressed genes and explained more YOE variance than pathogenic copy number variation but less than common variants. Disruptive, damaging ultra-rare variants in highly constrained genes influence the determinants of YOE in the general population.


#119 Cardiac fibrosis in myocardial infarction - from repair and remodeling to regeneration Link logo PDF logo

Talman, Virpi; Ruskoaho, Heikki Juhani

Cell & Tissue Research Volume 365, Issue 3, Pages 563–581

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Ischemic cell death during a myocardial infarction leads to a multiphase reparative response in which the damaged tissue is replaced with a fibrotic scar produced by fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. This also induces geometrical, biomechanical, and biochemical changes in the uninjured ventricular wall eliciting a reactive remodeling process that includes interstitial and perivascular fibrosis. Although the initial reparative fibrosis is crucial for preventing rupture of the ventricular wall, an exaggerated fibrotic response and reactive fibrosis outside the injured area are detrimental as they lead to progressive impairment of cardiac function and eventually to heart failure. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the mechanisms of both reparative and reactive cardiac fibrosis in response to myocardial infarction, discuss the potential of inducing cardiac regeneration through direct reprogramming of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts into cardiomyocytes, and review the currently available and potential future therapeutic strategies to inhibit cardiac fibrosis. Graphical abstract Reparative response following a myocardial infarction. Hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte death leads to the activation of myofibroblasts and a reparative fibrotic response in the injured area. Right top In adult mammals, the fibrotic scar formed at the infarcted area is permanent and promotes reactive fibrosis in the uninjured myocardium. Right bottom In teleost fish and newts and in embryonic and neonatal mammals, the initial formation of a fibrotic scar is followed by regeneration of the cardiac muscle tissue. Induction of post-infarction cardiac regeneration in adult mammals is currently the target of intensive research and drug discovery attempts.


#120 Effects of Exercise on Cognition:The Finnish Alzheimer Disease Exercise Trial: A Randomized, Controlled Trial Link logo PDF logo

Ohman, Hannareeta; Savikko, Niina; Strandberg, Timo E.; Kautiainen, Hannu; Raivio, Minna M.; Laakkonen, Marja-Liisa; Tilvis, Reijo; Pitkala, Kaisu H.

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Volume 64, Issue 4, Pages 731–738

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To examine whether a regular, long-term exercise program performed by individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) at home or as group-based exercise at an adult daycare center has beneficial effects on cognition; to examine secondary outcomes of a trial that has been published earlier. Randomized, controlled trial. Community. Community-dwelling dyads (N = 210) of individuals with AD and their spousal caregivers randomized into three groups. Two types of intervention comprising customized home-based exercise (HE) and group-based exercise (GE), each twice a week for 1 year, were compared with a control group (CG) receiving usual community care. Cognitive function was measured using the Clock Drawing Test (CDT), Verbal Fluency (VF), Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR), and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months of follow-up. Executive function, measured using CDT, improved in the HE group, and changes in the score were significantly better than those of the CG at 12 months (adjusted for age, sex, and CDR, P = .03). All groups deteriorated in VF and MMSE score during the intervention, and no significant differences between the groups were detected at 12-month follow-up when analyses were adjusted for age, sex, and CDR. Regular, long-term, customized HE improved the executive function of community-dwelling older people with memory disorders, but the effects were mild and were not observed in other domains of cognition.


#121 Perception and processing of faces in the human brain is tuned to typical feature locations Open access logo PDF logo

de Haas, Benjamin; Schwarzkopf, D. Samuel; Alvarez, Ivan; Lawson, Rebecca P.; Henriksson, Linda; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Rees, Geraint

Journal of Neuroscience Volume 36, Issue 36, Pages 9289–9302

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Faces are salient social stimuli whose features attract a stereotypical pattern of fixations. The implications of this gaze behavior for perception and brain activity are largely unknown. Here, we characterize and quantify a retinotopic bias implied by typical gaze behavior toward faces, which leads to eyes and mouth appearing most often in the upper and lower visual field, respectively. We found that the adult human visual system is tuned to these contingencies. In two recognition experiments, recognition performance for isolated face parts was better when they were presented at typical, rather than reversed, visual field locations. The recognition cost of reversed locations was equal to ∼60% of that for whole face inversion in the same sample. Similarly, an fMRI experiment showed that patterns of activity evoked by eye and mouth stimuli in the right inferior occipital gyrus could be separated with significantly higher accuracy when these features were presented at typical, rather than reversed, visual field locations. Our findings demonstrate that human face perception is determined not only by the local position of features within a face context, but by whether features appear at the typical retinotopic location given normal gaze behavior. Such location sensitivity may reflect fine-tuning of category-specific visual processing to retinal input statistics. Our findings further suggest that retinotopic heterogeneity might play a role for face inversion effects and for the understanding of conditions affecting gaze behavior toward faces, such as autism spectrum disorders and congenital prosopagnosia. Faces attract our attention and trigger stereotypical patterns of visual fixations, concentrating on inner features, like eyes and mouth. Here we show that the visual system represents face features better when they are shown at retinal positions where they typically fall during natural vision. When facial features were shown at typical (rather than reversed) visual field locations, they were discriminated better by humans and could be decoded with higher accuracy from brain activity patterns in the right occipital face area. This suggests that brain representations of face features do not cover the visual field uniformly. It may help us understand the well-known face-inversion effect and conditions affecting gaze behavior toward faces, such as prosopagnosia and autism spectrum disorders.


#122 Reduced ß-cell function in early preclinical type 1 diabetes Open access logo PDF logo

Koskinen MK, Helminen O, Matomäki J, Aspholm S, Mykkänen J, Mäkinen M, Simell V, Vähä-Mäkilä M, Simell T, Ilonen J, Knip M, Veijola R, Toppari J, Simell O

Diabetes Care

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#123 The human milk microbiome and factors influencing its composition and activity Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Gomez-Gallego C, Garcia-Mantrana I, Salminen S, Collado MC

Seminars in Fetal and Neonatal Medicine

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Beyond its nutritional aspects, human milk contains several bioactive compounds, such as microbes, oligosaccharides, and other substances, which are involved in host-microbe interactions and have a key role in infant health. New techniques have increased our understanding of milk microbiota composition, but few data on the activity of bioactive compounds and their biological role in infants are available. Whereas the human milk microbiome may be influenced by specific factors - including genetics, maternal health and nutrition, mode of delivery, breastfeeding, lactation stage, and geographic location - the impact of these factors on the infant microbiome is not yet known. This article gives an overview of milk microbiota composition and activity, including factors influencing microbial composition and their potential biological relevance on infants' future health.


#124 High-volume plasma exchange in patients with acute liver failure:An open randomised controlled trial Link logo PDF logo

Larsen, Fin Stolze; Schmidt, Lars Ebbe; Bernsmeier, Christine; Rasmussen, Allan; Isoniemi, Helena; Patel, Vishal C.; Triantafyllou, Evangelos; Bernal, William; Auzinger, Georg; Shawcross, Debbie; Eefsen, Martin; Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Clemmesen, Jens Otto; Hockerstedt, Krister; Frederiksen, Hans-Jorgen; Hansen, Bent Adel; Antoniades, Charalambos G.; Wendon, Julia

Journal of Hepatology Volume 64, Issue 1, Pages 69–78

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Acute liver failure (ALF) results in cardiovascular instability, renal failure, brain oedema and death either due to irreversible shock, cerebral herniation or development of multiple organ failure. High-volume plasma exchange (HVP), defined as exchange of 8-12 or 15% of ideal body weight with fresh fozen plasmain case series improves systemic, cerebral and splanchnic parameters. In this prospective, randomised, controlled, multicenter trial we randomly assigned 182 patients with ALF to receive either standard medical therapy (SMT;90 patients) or SMT plus HVP for three days (92 patients). The baseline characteristics of the groups were similar. The primary end point was liver transplantation-free survival during hospital stay. Secondary-end-points included survival after liver transplantation with or without HVP with intention-to-treat analysis. A proof-of-principle study evaluating the effect of HVP on the immune cell function was also undertaken. For the entire patient population, overall hospital survival was 58.7% for patients treated with HVP versus 47.8% for the control group (hazard ratio (HR), with stratification for liver transplantation: 0.56; 95% confidence interval (CI),0.36-0.86;P=0.0083). HVP prior to transplantation did not improve survival compared with patients who received SMT alone (CI 0.37 to 3.98; P = 0.75). The incidence of severe adverse events was similar in the two groups. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores fell in the treated group compared to control group, over the study period (P<0.001). Treatment with HVP improves outcome in patients with ALF by increasing liver transplant-free survival. This is attributable to attenuation of innate immune activation and amelioration of multi-organ dysfunction (MOF). (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00950508).


#125 Padeliporfin vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy versus active surveillance in men with low-risk prostate cancer (CLIN1001 PCM301) : an open-label, phase 3, randomised controlled trial Link logo PDF logo

Azzouzi Abdel-Rahmène; Vincendeau Sébastien; Barret Eric; Cicco Antony; Kleinclauss Francois; van der Poel Henk; Stief Christian; Rassweiler Jens; Salomon Georg; Solsona Eduardo; Alcaraz Antonio; Tammela Teuvo; Rosario Derek; Gomez-Veiga Francisco; Ahlgre

Lancet Oncology Volume 18, Issue 2

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Vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy, a novel tissue-preserving treatment for low-risk prostate cancer, has shown favourable safety and efficacy results in single-arm phase 1 and 2 studies. We compared this treatment with the standard of care, active surveillance, in men with low-risk prostate cancer in a phase 3 trial. This randomised controlled trial was done in 47 European university centres and community hospitals. Men with low-risk, localised prostate cancer (Gleason pattern 3) who had received no previous treatment were randomly assigned (1:1) to vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (4 mg/kg padeliporfin intravenously over 10 min and optical fibres inserted into the prostate to cover the desired treatment zone and subsequent activation by laser light 753 nm with a fixed power of 150 mW/cm for 22 min 15 s) or active surveillance. Randomisation was done by a web-based allocation system stratified by centre with balanced blocks of two or four patients. Best practice for active surveillance at the time of study design was followed (ie, biopsy at 12-month intervals and prostate-specific antigen measurement and digital rectal examination at 3-month intervals). The co-primary endpoints were treatment failure (histological progression of cancer from low to moderate or high risk or death during 24 months' follow-up) and absence of definite cancer (absence of any histology result definitely positive for cancer at month 24). Analysis was by intention to treat. Treatment was open-label, but investigators assessing primary efficacy outcomes were masked to treatment allocation. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01310894. Between March 8, 2011, and April 30, 2013, we randomly assigned 206 patients to vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy and 207 patients to active surveillance. Median follow-up was 24 months (IQR 24-25). The proportion of participants who had disease progression at month 24 was 58 (28%) of 206 in the vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy group compared with 120 (58%) of 207 in the active surveillance group (adjusted hazard ratio 0·34, 95% CI 0·24-0·46; p<0·0001). 101 (49%) men in the vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy group had a negative prostate biopsy result at 24 months post treatment compared with 28 (14%) men in the active surveillance group (adjusted risk ratio 3·67, 95% CI 2·53-5·33; p<0·0001). Vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy was well tolerated. The most common grade 3-4 adverse events were prostatitis (three [2%] in the vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy group vs one [<1%] in the active surveillance group), acute urinary retention (three [2%] vs one [<1%]) and erectile dysfunction (two [1%] vs three [1%]). The most common serious adverse event in the vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy group was retention of urine (15 patients; severe in three); this event resolved within 2 months in all patients. The most common serious adverse event in the active surveillance group was myocardial infarction (three patients). Padeliporfin vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy is a safe, effective treatment for low-risk, localised prostate cancer. This treatment might allow more men to consider a tissue-preserving approach and defer or avoid radical therapy. Steba Biotech.


#126 Cross-frequency synchronization connects networks of fast and slow oscillations during visual working memory maintenance Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Siebenhuhner, Felix; Wang, Sheng H.; Palva, J. Matias; Palva, Satu

eLife

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Neuronal activity in sensory and fronto-parietal (FP) areas underlies the representation and attentional control, respectively, of sensory information maintained in visual working memory (VWM). Within these regions, beta/gamma phase-synchronization supports the integration of sensory functions, while synchronization in theta/alpha bands supports the regulation of attentional functions. A key challenge is to understand which mechanisms integrate neuronal processing across these distinct frequencies and thereby the sensory and attentional functions. We investigated whether such integration could be achieved by cross-frequency phase synchrony (CFS). Using concurrent magneto- and electroencephalography, we found that CFS was load-dependently enhanced between theta and alpha-gamma and between alpha and beta/gamma oscillations during VWM maintenance among visual, FP, and dorsal attention (DA) systems. CFS also connected the hubs of within-frequency-synchronized networks and its strength predicted individual VWM capacity. We propose that CFS integrates processing among synchronized neuronal networks from theta to gamma frequencies to link sensory and attentional functions.


#127 Mortality of emergency abdominal surgery in high-, middle- and low-income countries Link logo PDF logo

Bhangu, A.; Fitzgerald, J. E. F.; Ademuyiwa, A. O.; Recinos, G.; Khatri, C.; Glasbey, J. C.; Drake, T. M.; Mohan, M.; Lilford, R.; Soreide, K.; Harrison, E. M.; Gobin, N.; Vega Freitas, A.; Hall, N.; Kim, S. -H.; Negida, A.; Jaffry, Z.; Chapman, S. J.; Arnaud, A. P.; Tabiri, S.

British Journal of Surgery Volume 103, Issue 8, Pages 971–988

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Surgical mortality data are collected routinely in high-income countries, yet virtually no low- or middle-income countries have outcome surveillance in place. The aim was prospectively to collect worldwide mortality data following emergency abdominal surgery, comparing findings across countries with a low, middle or high Human Development Index (HDI). This was a prospective, multicentre, cohort study. Self-selected hospitals performing emergency surgery submitted prespecified data for consecutive patients from at least one 2-week interval during July to December 2014. Postoperative mortality was analysed by hierarchical multivariable logistic regression. Data were obtained for 10 745 patients from 357 centres in 58 countries; 6538 were from high-, 2889 from middle- and 1318 from low-HDI settings. The overall mortality rate was 1·6 per cent at 24 h (high 1·1 per cent, middle 1·9 per cent, low 3·4 per cent; P < 0·001), increasing to 5·4 per cent by 30 days (high 4·5 per cent, middle 6·0 per cent, low 8·6 per cent; P < 0·001). Of the 578 patients who died, 404 (69·9 per cent) did so between 24 h and 30 days following surgery (high 74·2 per cent, middle 68·8 per cent, low 60·5 per cent). After adjustment, 30-day mortality remained higher in middle-income (odds ratio (OR) 2·78, 95 per cent c.i. 1·84 to 4·20) and low-income (OR 2·97, 1·84 to 4·81) countries. Surgical safety checklist use was less frequent in low- and middle-income countries, but when used was associated with reduced mortality at 30 days. Mortality is three times higher in low- compared with high-HDI countries even when adjusted for prognostic factors. Patient safety factors may have an important role. Registration number: NCT02179112 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov).


#128 Global Role and Burden of Influenza in Pediatric Respiratory Hospitalizations, 1982-2012: A Systematic Analysis Link logo PDF logo

Lafond; Kathryn E.; Nair; Harish; Rasooly; Mohammad Hafiz; Valente; Fatima; Booy; Robert; Rahman; Mahmudur; Kitsutani; Paul; Yu; Hongjie; Guzman; Guiselle; Coulibaly; Daouda; Armero; Julio; Jima; Daddi; Howie; Stephen R. C.; Ampofo; William; Mena; Ricardo; Chadha; Mandeep; Sampurno; Ondri Dwi; Emukule; Gideon O.; Nurmatov; Zuridin; Corwin; Andrew; Heraud; Jean Michel; Noyola; Daniel E.; Cojocaru; Radu; Nymadawa; Pagbajabyn; Barakat; Amal; Adedeji; Adebayo; von Horoch; Marta; Olveda; Remigio; Nya

PLoS Medicine Volume 13, Issue 3

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The global burden of pediatric severe respiratory illness is substantial, and influenza viruses contribute to this burden. Systematic surveillance and testing for influenza among hospitalized children has expanded globally over the past decade. However, only a fraction of the data has been used to estimate influenza burden. In this analysis, we use surveillance data to provide an estimate of influenza-associated hospitalizations among children worldwide. We aggregated data from a systematic review (n = 108) and surveillance platforms (n = 37) to calculate a pooled estimate of the proportion of samples collected from children hospitalized with respiratory illnesses and positive for influenza by age group (<6 mo, <1 y, <2 y, <5 y, 5-17 y, and <18 y). We applied this proportion to global estimates of acute lower respiratory infection hospitalizations among children aged <1 y and <5 y, to obtain the number and per capita rate of influenza-associated hospitalizations by geographic region and socio-economic status. Influenza was associated with 10% (95% CI 8%-11%) of respiratory hospitalizations in children <18 y worldwide, ranging from 5% (95% CI 3%-7%) among children <6 mo to 16% (95% CI 14%-20%) among children 5-17 y. On average, we estimated that influenza results in approximately 374,000 (95% CI 264,000 to 539,000) hospitalizations in children <1 y-of which 228,000 (95% CI 150,000 to 344,000) occur in children <6 mo-and 870,000 (95% CI 610,000 to 1,237,000) hospitalizations in children <5 y annually. Influenza-associated hospitalization rates were more than three times higher in developing countries than in industrialized countries (150/100,000 children/year versus 48/100,000). However, differences in hospitalization practices between settings are an important limitation in interpreting these findings. Influenza is an important contributor to respiratory hospitalizations among young children worldwide. Increasing influenza vaccination coverage among young children and pregnant women could reduce this burden and protect infants <6 mo.


#129 Development and experimentation platform for social, health and wellbeing services in the context of Kalasatama health and wellbeing centre Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Hirvikoski, Tuija; Lehto, Paula; Äyväri, Anne

Child: Care, Health & Development Volume 43, Issue 1, Pages 18–30

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Families with a child diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often utilize a variety of professional services. The provision of these services has many potential benefits for families; however, these services also place demands on parents, particularly mothers, to access, navigate and participate. Little is known about how involvement with these services and service systems influences the psychological wellbeing of mothers of children diagnosed with ASD. We examined the relationship between professional services and psychological wellbeing for mothers of children diagnosed with ASD. Mothers (n = 119) of children (mean child age 10.1 years; range 2-24 years) diagnosed with ASD anonymously completed a comprehensive survey. The survey included data related to maternal psychological wellbeing, professional services received and perceptions of these services, and child, mother and household characteristics. Regression analyses revealed that maternal psychological wellbeing was positively associated with the perceived continuity of services, and negatively associated with the number of professionals involved. Child and maternal age, and household income were also statistically significant predictors of maternal psychological wellbeing. The study findings draw attention to the potentially negative impact of systems-level challenges, especially fragmentation of services, on maternal psychological wellbeing, despite positive front-line services. In particular, our data suggest that psychological wellbeing among mothers of children with ASD may vary more as a function of service system variables than practitioner-level or child-level variables.


#130 REVEL: An Ensemble Method for Predicting the Pathogenicity of Rare Missense Variants PDF logo

Ioannidis NM, Rothstein JH, Pejaver V, Middha S, McDonnell SK, Baheti S, Musolf A, Li Q, Holzinger E, Karyadi D, Cannon-Albright LA, Teerlink CC, Stanford JL, Isaacs WB, Xu JF, Cooney KA, Lange EM, Schleutker J, Carpten JD, Powell IJ, Cussenot O, Cancel-Tassin G, Giles GG, MacInnis RJ, Maier C, Hsieh CL, Wiklund F, Catalona WJ, Foulkes WD, Mandal D, Eeles RA, Kote-Jarai Z, Bustamante CD, Schaid DJ, Hastie T, Ostrander EA, Bailey-Wilson JE, Radivojac P, Thibodeau SN, Whittemore AS, Sieh W

American Journal of Human Genetics Volume 99, Issue 4

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The vast majority of coding variants are rare, and assessment of the contribution of rare variants to complex traits is hampered by low statistical power and limited functional data. Improved methods for predicting the pathogenicity of rare coding variants are needed to facilitate the discovery of disease variants from exome sequencing studies. We developed REVEL (rare exome variant ensemble learner), an ensemble method for predicting the pathogenicity of missense variants on the basis of individual tools: MutPred, FATHMM, VEST, PolyPhen, SIFT, PROVEAN, MutationAssessor, MutationTaster, LRT, GERP, SiPhy, phyloP, and phastCons. REVEL was trained with recently discovered pathogenic and rare neutral missense variants, excluding those previously used to train its constituent tools. When applied to two independent test sets, REVEL had the best overall performance (p < 10(-12)) as compared to any individual tool and seven ensemble methods: MetaSVM, MetaLR, KGGSeq, Condel, CADD, DANN, and Eigen. Importantly, REVEL also had the best performance for distinguishing pathogenic from rare neutral variants with allele frequencies <0.5%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for REVEL was 0.046-0.182 higher in an independent test set of 935 recent SwissVar disease variants and 123,935 putatively neutral exome sequencing variants and 0.027-0.143 higher in an independent test set of 1,953 pathogenic and 2,406 benign variants recently reported in ClinVar than the AUCs for other ensemble methods. We provide pre-computed REVEL scores for all possible human missense variants to facilitate the identification of pathogenic variants in the sea of rare variants discovered as sequencing studies expand in scale.


#131 Bapineuzumab for mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease in two global, randomized, phase 3 trials Open access logo PDF logo

Vandenberghe R, Rinne JO, Boada M, Katayama S, Scheltens P, Vellas B, Tuchman M, Gass A, Fiebach JB, Hill D, Lobello K, Li D, McRae T, Lucas P, Evans I, Booth K, Luscan G, Wyman BT, Hua LS, Yang LF, Brashear HR, Black RS

Alzheimer's Research & Therapy Volume 8, Issue 1

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Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy (clinical and biomarker) and safety of intravenous bapineuzumab in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD). Two of four phase 3, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 18-month trials were conducted globally: one in apolipoprotein E ε4 carriers and another in noncarriers. Patients received bapineuzumab 0.5 mg/kg (both trials) or 1.0 mg/kg (noncarrier trial) or placebo every 13 weeks. Coprimary endpoints were change from baseline to week 78 on the 11-item Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale and the Disability Assessment for Dementia. A total of 683 and 329 patients completed the current carrier and noncarrier trials, respectively, which were terminated prematurely owing to lack of efficacy in the two other phase 3 trials of bapineuzumab in AD. The current trials showed no significant difference between bapineuzumab and placebo for the coprimary endpoints and no effect of bapineuzumab on amyloid load or cerebrospinal fluid phosphorylated tau. (Both measures were stable over time in the placebo group.) Amyloid-related imaging abnormalities with edema or effusion were confirmed as the most notable adverse event. These phase 3 global trials confirmed lack of efficacy of bapineuzumab at tested doses on clinical endpoints in patients with mild to moderate AD. Some differences in the biomarker results were seen compared with the other phase 3 bapineuzumab trials. No unexpected adverse events were observed. Noncarriers (3000) ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00667810 ; registered 24 Apr 2008. Carriers (3001) ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00676143 ; registered 2 May 2008.


#132 Personality disorders and suicide attempts in unipolar and bipolar mood disorders Link logo PDF logo

Jylhä, Pekka; Rosenstrom, Tom; Mantere, Outi; Suominen, Kirsi; Melartin, Tarja; Vuorilehto, Maria; Holma, Mikael; Riihimaki, Kirsi; Oquendo, Maria A.; Keltikangas-Jarvinen, Liisa; Isometsa, Erkki T.

Journal of Affective Disorders

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Comorbid personality disorders may predispose patients with mood disorders to suicide attempts (SAs), but factors mediating this effect are not well known. Altogether 597 patients from three prospective cohort studies (Vantaa Depression Study, Jorvi Bipolar Study, and Vantaa Primary Care Depression Study) were interviewed at baseline, at 18 months, and in VDS and PC-VDS at 5 years. Personality disorders (PDs) at baseline, number of previous SAs, life-charted time spent in major depressive episodes (MDEs), and precise timing of SAs during follow-up were determined and investigated. Overall, 219 (36.7%) patients had a total of 718 lifetime SAs; 88 (14.7%) patients had 242 SAs during the prospective follow-up. Having any PD diagnosis increased the SA rate, both lifetime and prospectively evaluated, by 90% and 102%, respectively. All PD clusters increased the rate of new SAs, although cluster C PDs more than the others. After adjusting for time spent in MDEs, only cluster C further increased the SA rate (by 52%). Mediation analyses of PD effects on prospectively ascertained SAs indicated significant mediated effects through time at risk in MDEs, but also some direct effects. Findings generalizable only to patients with mood disorders. Among mood disorder patients, comorbid PDs increase the risk of SAs to approximately two-fold. The excess risk is mostly due to patients with comorbid PDs spending more time in depressive episodes than those without. Consequently, risk appears highest for PDs that most predispose to chronicity and recurrences. However, also direct risk-modifying effects of PDs exist.


#133 AIRE-Deficient Patients Harbor Unique High-Affinity Disease-Ameliorating Autoantibodies Link logo PDF logo

Meyer, Steffen; Woodward, Martin; Hertel, Christina; Vlaicu, Philip; Haque, Yasmin; Karner, Jaanika; Macagno, Annalisa; Onuoha, Shimobi C.; Fishman, Dmytro; Peterson, Hedi; Metskula, Kaja; Uibo, Raivo; Jäntti, Kirsi; Hokynar, Kati; Wolff, Anette S. B.; Krohn, Kai; Ranki, Annamari; Peterson, Part; Kisand, Kai; Hayday, Adrian

Cell Volume 166, Issue 3, Pages 582–595

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APS1/APECED patients are defined by defects in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) that mediates central T cell tolerance to many self-antigens. AIRE deficiency also affects B cell tolerance, but this is incompletely understood. Here we show that most APS1/APECED patients displayed B cell autoreactivity toward unique sets of approximately 100 self-proteins. Thereby, autoantibodies from 81 patients collectively detected many thousands of human proteins. The loss of B cell tolerance seemingly occurred during antibody affinity maturation, an obligatorily T cell-dependent step. Consistent with this, many APS1/APECED patients harbored extremely high-affinity, neutralizing autoantibodies, particularly against specific cytokines. Such antibodies were biologically active in vitro and in vivo, and those neutralizing type I interferons (IFNs) showed a striking inverse correlation with type I diabetes, not shown by other anti-cytokine antibodies. Thus, naturally occurring human autoantibodies may actively limit disease and be of therapeutic utility.


#134 Increased Melatonin Signaling Is a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes Link logo PDF logo

Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Nagorny, Cecilia L. F.; Singh, Pratibha; Bennet, Hedvig; Yu, Qian; Alenkvist, Ida; Isomaa, Bo; Ostman, Bjarne; Soderstrom, Johan; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Martikainen, Silja; Räikkönen, Katri; Forsen, Tom; Hakaste, Liisa; Almgren, Peter; Storm, Petter; Asplund, Olof; Shcherbina, Liliya; Fex, Malin; Fadista, Joao

Cell Metabolism (Science Direct) Volume 23, Issue 6, Pages 1067–1077

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Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a global pandemic. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified >100 genetic variants associated with the disease, including a common variant in the melatonin receptor 1 b gene (MTNR1B). Here, we demonstrate increased MTNR1B expression in human islets from risk G-allele carriers, which likely leads to a reduction in insulin release, increasing T2D risk. Accordingly, in insulin-secreting cells, melatonin reduced cAMP levels, and MTNR1B overexpression exaggerated the inhibition of insulin release exerted by melatonin. Conversely, mice with a disruption of the receptor secreted more insulin. Melatonin treatment in a human recall-by-genotype study reduced insulin secretion and raised glucose levels more extensively in risk G-allele carriers. Thus, our data support a model where enhanced melatonin signaling in islets reduces insulin secretion, leading to hyperglycemia and greater future risk of T2D. The findings also imply that melatonin physiologically serves to inhibit nocturnal insulin release.


#135 Data-driven approaches in the investigation of social perception PDF logo

Adolphs R; Nummenmaa L; Todorov A; Haxby JV

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Volume 371, Issue 1693

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The complexity of social perception poses a challenge to traditional approaches to understand its psychological and neurobiological underpinnings. Data-driven methods are particularly well suited to tackling the often high-dimensional nature of stimulus spaces and of neural representations that characterize social perception. Such methods are more exploratory, capitalize on rich and large datasets, and attempt to discover patterns often without strict hypothesis testing. We present four case studies here: behavioural studies on face judgements, two neuroimaging studies of movies, and eyetracking studies in autism. We conclude with suggestions for particular topics that seem ripe for data-driven approaches, as well as caveats and limitations.


#136 Microbes and asthma: Opportunities for intervention PDF logo

Smits HH, Hiemstra PS, da Costa CP, Ege M, Edwards M, Garn H, Howarth PH, Jartti T, de Jong EC, Maizels RM, Marsland BJ, McSorley HJ, Muller A, Pfefferle PI, Savelkoul H, Schwarze J, Unger WWJ, von Mutius E, Yazdanbakhsh M, Taube C

The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Volume 137, Issue 3, Pages 690–697

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The worldwide incidence and prevalence of asthma continues to increase. Asthma is now understood as an umbrella term for different phenotypes or endotypes, which arise through different pathophysiologic pathways. Understanding the many factors contributing to development of the disease is important for the identification of novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of certain asthma phenotypes. The hygiene hypothesis has been formulated to explain the increasing prevalence of allergic disease, including asthma. This hypothesis postulates that decreased exposure at a young age to certain infectious agents as a result of improved hygiene, increased antibiotic use and vaccination, and changes in lifestyle and dietary habits is associated with changes in the immune system, which predispose subjects to allergy. Many microbes, during their coevolution with human subjects, developed mechanisms to manipulate the human immune system and to increase their chances of survival. Improving models of asthma, as well as choosing adequate end points in clinical trials, will lead to a more complete understanding of the underlying mechanisms, thus providing an opportunity to devise primary and secondary interventions at the same time as identifying new molecular targets for treatment. This article reports the discussion and conclusion of a workshop under the auspices of the Netherlands Lung Foundation to extend our understanding of how modulation of the immune system by bacterial, parasitic, and viral infections might affect the development of asthma and to map out future lines of investigation.


#137 Exploratory factor analysis of a 16D Health- Related Quality of Life instrument with adolescents seeking help for early psychiatric symptoms Link logo

Granö, Niklas; Kieseppä, Tuula; Karjalainen, Marjaana; Roine, Mikko

Nordic Journal of Psychiatry

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Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is a widely studied phenomenon in health care. This study aimed to identify which factors can be extracted from a generic 16-dimension (16D) HRQoL instrument in a sample of adolescents seeking help for early psychiatric symptoms. Data were collected at the Helsinki University Central Hospital (HUCH), Finland, by an early intervention team. In total, 394 help-seeking adolescents (mean age 15.3 years, SD 2.14 years, 183 boys and 211 girls) completed a 16D HRQoL questionnaire. Exploratory factor analysis (generalized least squares method, promax rotation) identified four factors in the 16D instrument. The first factor of "psychophysiological health" included the dimensions of vitality, breathing, distress, sleeping, physical appearance, mental functioning and depression. The second factor, "physical and social health", consisted of the items discomfort and symptoms, friends and elimination. The items hearing, eating and speech were loaded on factor three, "health in somatosensory functioning". Moreover, the single item of school and hobbies was loaded on factor four, "health in functioning ability". However, the items of vision and mobility were not loaded on any factor. Since the 16D instrument was originally designed for 11-15-year-old adolescents, analysis was repeated using a subsample of this age group (n = 245). The results here suggest that the 16D instrument consists of four factors and forms its own latent variable structure in this specific sample of adolescents seeking help for early psychiatric symptoms. However, items such as vision, mobility and school and hobbies should be interpreted with caution as a part of the factor structure of a 16D instrument among this population.


#138 Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease Link logo PDF logo

Zanoni Paolo; Khetarpal Sumeet A; Larach Daniel B; Hancock-Cerutti William F; Millar John S; Cuchel Marina; DerOhannessian Stephanie; Kontush Anatol; Surendran Praveen; Saleheen Danish; Trompet Stella; Jukema J Wouter; De Craen Anton; Deloukas Panos; Sattar Naveed; Ford Ian; Packard Chris; Majumder Abdullah a; Alam Dewan S; Di Angelantonio Emanuele et al

Science Volume 351, Issue 6278, Pages 1166–1171

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Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from the homozygous subject, and in mice. Large population-based studies revealed that subjects who are heterozygous carriers of the P376L variant have significantly increased levels of plasma HDL-C. P376L carriers have a profound HDL-related phenotype and an increased risk of CHD (odds ratio = 1.79, which is statistically significant).


#139 Phase Dependency of the Human Primary Motor Cortex and Cholinergic Inhibition Cancelation During Beta tACS

Guerra A; Pogosyan A; Nowak M; Tan H; Ferreri F; Di Lazzaro V; Brown P

Cerebral Cortex

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The human motor cortex has a tendency to resonant activity at about 20 Hz so stimulation should more readily entrain neuronal populations at this frequency. We investigated whether and how different interneuronal circuits contribute to such resonance by using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) at motor (20 Hz) and a nonmotor resonance frequency (7 Hz). We tested different TMS interneuronal protocols and triggered TMS pulses at different tACS phases. The effect of cholinergic short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) was abolished by 20 Hz tACS, linking cortical beta activity to sensorimotor integration. However, this effect occurred regardless of the tACS phase. In contrast, 20 Hz tACS selectively modulated MEP size according to the phase of tACS during single pulse, GABAAergic short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and glutamatergic intracortical facilitation (ICF). For SICI this phase effect was more marked during 20 Hz stimulation. Phase modulation of SICI also depended on whether or not spontaneous beta activity occurred at ~20 Hz, supporting an interaction effect between tACS and underlying circuit resonances. The present study provides in vivo evidence linking cortical beta activity to sensorimotor integration, and for beta oscillations in motor cortex being promoted by resonance in GABAAergic interneuronal circuits.


#140 Parental influences and mothers’ experiences on infant and young child feeding practices Open access logo Link logo

Vaarno. Jenni

Maternal & Child Nutrition Volume 7, Issue 1, Pages 48–60

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#141 Interaction between dietary lipids and gut microbiota regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism Link logo PDF logo

Caesar, Robert; Nygrén, Heli; Oresic, Matej; Bäckhed, Fredrik

Journal of Lipid Research Volume 57, Issue 3, Pages 474–481

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The gut microbiota influences many aspects of host metabolism. We have previously shown that the presence of a gut microbiota remodels lipid composition. Here we investigated how interaction between gut microbiota and dietary lipids regulates lipid composition in liver and plasma, and gene expression in liver. Germ-free and conventionally raised mice were fed lard or fish oil diet for 11 weeks. We performed lipidomics analysis of liver and serum and microarray analysis of liver. As expected, most of the variation in the lipidomics dataset was induced by the diet and abundance of most lipid classes differed between mice fed lard and fish oil. However, the gut microbiota also affected lipid composition. The gut microbiota increased hepatic levels of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters in mice fed lard but not in mice fed fish oil. Serum levels of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters were not affected by the gut microbiota. Genes encoding enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis were downregulated by the gut microbiota in mice fed lard and were expressed at a low level in mice fed fish oil independent of microbial status. In summary, we show that gut microbiota-induced regulation of hepatic cholesterol metabolism is dependent on dietary lipid composition.


#142 Subjective health literacy : Development of a brief instrument for school-aged children Link logo

Paakkari, Olli;Torppa, Minna;Kannas, Lasse;Paakkari, Leena

Scandinavian Journal of Public Health

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The present paper focuses on the measurement of health literacy (HL), which is an important determinant of health and health behaviours. HL starts to develop in childhood and adolescence; hence, there is a need for instruments to monitor HL among younger age groups. These instruments are still rare. The aim of the project reported here was, therefore, to develop a brief, multidimensional, theory-based instrument to measure subjective HL among school-aged children. The development of the instrument covered four phases: item generation based on a conceptual framework; a pilot study (n = 405); test-retest (n = 117); and construction of the instrument (n = 3853). All the samples were taken from Finnish 7th and 9th graders. Initially, 65 items were generated, of which 32 items were selected for the pilot study. After item reduction, the instrument contained 16 items. The test-retest phase produced estimates of stability. In the final phase a 10-item instrument was constructed, referred to as Health Literacy for School-Aged Children (HLSAC). The instrument exhibited a high Cronbach alpha (0.93), and included two items from each of the five predetermined theoretical components (theoretical knowledge, practical knowledge, critical thinking, self-awareness, citizenship). CONCLUSIONS THE ITERATIVE AND VALIDITY-DRIVEN DEVELOPMENT PROCESS MADE IT POSSIBLE TO CONSTRUCT A BRIEF MULTIDIMENSIONAL HLSAC INSTRUMENT SUCH INSTRUMENTS ARE SUITABLE FOR LARGE-SCALE STUDIES, AND FOR USE WITH CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS VALIDATION WILL REQUIRE FURTHER TESTING FOR USE IN OTHER COUNTRIES.


#143 Generic oncology drugs:are they all safe? Link logo PDF logo

Yang, Y. Tony; Nagai, Sumimasa; Chen, Brian K.; Qureshi, Zaina P.; Lebby, Akida A.; Kessler, Samuel; Georgantopoulos, Peter; Raisch, Dennis W.; Sartor, Oliver; Hermanson, Terhi; Kane, Robert C.; Hrushesky, William J.; Riente, Joshua J.; Norris, Leann B.; Bobolts, Laura R.; Armitage, James O.; Bennett, Charles L.

Lancet Oncology Volume 17, Issue 11, Pages e493–e501

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Although the availability of generic oncology drugs allows access to contemporary care and reduces costs, there is international variability in the safety of this class of drugs. In this Series paper, we review clinical, policy, safety, and regulatory considerations for generic oncology drugs focusing on the USA, Canada, the European Union (EU), Japan, China, and India. Safety information about generic formulations is reviewed from one agent in each class, for heavy metal drugs (cisplatin), targeted agents (imatinib), and cytotoxic agents (docetaxel). We also review regulatory reports from Japan and the USA, countries with the largest pharmaceutical expenditures. Empirical studies did not identify safety concerns in the USA, Canada, the EU, and Japan, where regulations and enforcement are strong. Although manufacturing problems for generic pharmaceuticals exist in India, where 40% of all generic pharmaceuticals used in the USA are manufactured, increased inspections and communication by the US Food and Drug Administration are occurring, facilitating oversight and enforcement. No safety outbreaks among generic oncology drugs were reported in developed countries. For developing countries, oversight is less intensive, and concerns around drug safety still exist. Regulatory agencies should collaboratively develop procedures to monitor the production, shipment, storage, and post-marketing safety of generic oncology drugs. Regulatory agencies for each country should also aim towards identical definitions of bioequivalence, the cornerstone of regulatory approval.


#144 Cabozantinib versus everolimus in advanced renal cell carcinoma (METEOR):final results from a randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial Link logo PDF logo

Choueiri, Toni K.; Escudier, Bernard; Powles, Thomas; Tannir, Nizar M.; Mainwaring, Paul N.; Rini, Brian I.; Hammers, Hans J.; Donskov, Frede; Roth, Bruce J.; Peltola, Katriina; Lee, Jae Lyun; Heng, Daniel Y. C.; Schmidinger, Manuela; Agarwal, Neeraj; Sternberg, Cora N.; McDermott, David F.; Aftab, Dana T.; Hessel, Colin; Old, Christian Scheff; Schwab, Gisela

Lancet Oncology Volume 17, Issue 7, Pages 917–927

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Cabozantinib is an oral inhibitor of tyrosine kinases including MET, VEGFR, and AXL. The randomised phase 3 METEOR trial compared the efficacy and safety of cabozantinib versus the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma who progressed after previous VEGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor treatment. Here, we report the final overall survival results from this study based on an unplanned second interim analysis. In this open-label, randomised phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned (1:1) patients aged 18 years and older with advanced or metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma, measurable disease, and previous treatment with one or more VEGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors to receive 60 mg cabozantinib once a day or 10 mg everolimus once a day. Randomisation was done with an interactive voice and web response system. Stratification factors were Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center risk group and the number of previous treatments with VEGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival as assessed by an independent radiology review committee in the first 375 randomly assigned patients and has been previously reported. Secondary endpoints were overall survival and objective response in all randomly assigned patients assessed by intention-to-treat. Safety was assessed per protocol in all patients who received at least one dose of study drug. The study is closed for enrolment but treatment and follow-up of patients is ongoing for long-term safety evaluation. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01865747. Between Aug 8, 2013, and Nov 24, 2014, 658 patients were randomly assigned to receive cabozantinib (n=330) or everolimus (n=328). The median duration of follow-up for overall survival and safety was 18·7 months (IQR 16·1-21·1) in the cabozantinib group and 18·8 months (16·0-21·2) in the everolimus group. Median overall survival was 21·4 months (95% CI 18·7-not estimable) with cabozantinib and 16·5 months (14·7-18·8) with everolimus (hazard ratio [HR] 0·66 [95% CI 0·53-0·83]; p=0·00026). Cabozantinib treatment also resulted in improved progression-free survival (HR 0·51 [95% CI 0·41-0·62]; p<0·0001) and objective response (17% [13-22] with cabozantinib vs 3% [2-6] with everolimus; p<0·0001) per independent radiology review among all randomised patients. The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were hypertension (49 [15%] in the cabozantinib group vs 12 [4%] in the everolimus group), diarrhoea (43 [13%] vs 7 [2%]), fatigue (36 [11%] vs 24 [7%]), palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia syndrome (27 [8%] vs 3 [1%]), anaemia (19 [6%] vs 53 [17%]), hyperglycaemia (3 [1%] vs 16 [5%]), and hypomagnesaemia (16 [5%] vs none). Serious adverse events grade 3 or worse occurred in 130 (39%) patients in the cabozantinib group and in 129 (40%) in the everolimus group. One treatment-related death occurred in the cabozantinib group (death; not otherwise specified) and two occurred in the everolimus group (one aspergillus infection and one pneumonia aspiration). Treatment with cabozantinib increased overall survival, delayed disease progression, and improved the objective response compared with everolimus. Based on these results, cabozantinib should be considered as a new standard-of-care treatment option for previously treated patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. Patients should be monitored for adverse events that might require dose modifications. Exelixis Inc.


#145 Current concepts in chronic inflammatory diseases:Interactions between microbes, cellular metabolism, and inflammation Link logo PDF logo

Garn, Holger; Bahn, Sabine; Baune, Bernhard T.; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Bisgaard, Hans; Chatila, Talal A.; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Culmsee, Carsten; Dannlowski, Udo; Gay, Steffen; Gern, James; Haahtela, Tari; Kircher, Tilo; Mueller-Ladner, Ulf; Neurath, Markus F.; Preissner, Klaus T.; Reinhardt, Christoph; Rook, Graham; Russell, Shannon; Schmeck, Bernd

The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Volume 138, Issue 1, Pages 47–56

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Recent research indicates that chronic inflammatory diseases, including allergies and autoimmune and neuropsychiatric diseases, share common pathways of cellular and molecular dysregulation. It was the aim of the International von-Behring-Röntgen Symposium (October 16-18, 2014, in Marburg, Germany) to discuss recent developments in this field. These include a concept of biodiversity; the contribution of urbanization, lifestyle factors, and nutrition (eg, vitamin D); and new mechanisms of metabolic and immune dysregulation, such as extracellular and intracellular RNAs and cellular and mitochondrial stress. Epigenetic mechanisms contribute further to altered gene expression and therefore to the development of chronic inflammation. These novel findings provide the foundation for further development of preventive and therapeutic strategies.


#146 Reorganization of functionally connected brain subnetworks in high-functioning autism PDF logo

Glerean E, Pan RK, Salmi J, Kujala R, Lahnakoski JM, Roine U, Nummenmaa L, Leppämäki S, Nieminen-von Wendt T, Tani P, Saramäki J, Sams M, Jääskeläinen IP

Human Brain Mapping Volume 37, Issue 3, Pages 1066–1079

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Previous functional connectivity studies have found both hypo- and hyper-connectivity in brains of individuals having autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here we studied abnormalities in functional brain subnetworks in high-functioning individuals with ASD during free viewing of a movie containing social cues and interactions. Twenty-six subjects (13 with ASD) watched a 68-min movie during functional magnetic resonance imaging. For each subject, we computed Pearson's correlation between haemodynamic time-courses of each pair of 6-mm isotropic voxels. From the whole-brain functional networks, we derived individual and group-level subnetworks using graph theory. Scaled inclusivity was then calculated between all subject pairs to estimate intersubject similarity of connectivity structure of each subnetwork. Additional 54 individuals (27 with ASD) from the ABIDE resting-state database were included to test the reproducibility of the results. Between-group differences were observed in the composition of default-mode and ventro-temporal-limbic (VTL) subnetworks. The VTL subnetwork included amygdala, striatum, thalamus, parahippocampal, fusiform, and inferior temporal gyri. Further, VTL subnetwork similarity between subject pairs correlated significantly with similarity of symptom gravity measured with autism quotient. This correlation was observed also within the controls, and in the reproducibility dataset with ADI-R and ADOS scores. Our results highlight how the reorganization of functional subnetworks in individuals with ASD clarifies the mixture of hypo- and hyper-connectivity findings. Importantly, only the functional organization of the VTL subnetwork emerges as a marker of inter-individual similarities that co-vary with behavioral measures across all participants. These findings suggest a pivotal role of ventro-temporal and limbic systems in autism. Hum Brain Mapp, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


#147 A novel approach to sports concussion assessment: Computerized multilimb reaction times and balance control testing

Vartiainen MV; Holm A; Lukander J; Lukander K; Koskinen S; Bornstein R; Hokkanen L

Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology Volume 38, Issue 3

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Mild traumatic brain injuries (MTBI) or concussions often result in problems with attention, executive functions, and motor control. For better identification of these diverse problems, novel approaches integrating tests of cognitive and motor functioning are needed. The aim was to characterize minor changes in motor and cognitive performance after sports-related concussions with a novel test battery, including balance tests and a computerized multilimb reaction time test. The cognitive demands of the battery gradually increase from a simple stimulus response to a complex task requiring executive attention. A total of 113 male ice hockey players (mean age = 24.6 years, SD = 5.7) were assessed before a season. During the season, nine concussed players were retested within 36 hours, four to six days after the concussion, and after the season. A control group of seven nonconcussed players from the same pool of players with comparable demographics were retested after the season. Performance was measured using a balance test and the Motor Cognitive Test battery (MotCoTe) with multilimb responses in simple reaction, choice reaction, inhibition, and conflict resolution conditions. The performance of the concussed group declined at the postconcussion assessment compared to both the baseline measurement and the nonconcussed controls. Significant changes were observed in the concussed group for the multilimb choice reaction and inhibition tests. Tapping and balance showed a similar trend, but no statistically significant difference in performance. In sports-related concussions, complex motor tests can be valuable additions in assessing the outcome and recovery. In the current study, using subtasks with varying cognitive demands, it was shown that while simple motor performance was largely unaffected, the more complex tasks induced impaired reaction times for the concussed subjects. The increased reaction times may reflect the disruption of complex and integrative cognitive function in concussions.


#148 The role of physical activity and exercise in obesity and weight management: Time for critical appraisal Open access logo Link logo

Wiklund, Petri

Journal of Sport and Health Science

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#149 The Pentose Phosphate Pathway Regulates the Circadian Clock Link logo PDF logo

Rey, Guillaume; Valekunja, Utham K.; Feeney, Kevin A.; Wulund, Lisa; Milev, Nikolay B.; Stangherlin, Alessandra; Ansel-Bollepalli, Laura; Velagapudi, Vidya; O'Neill, John S.; Reddy, Akhilesh B.

Cell Metabolism (Science Direct) Volume 24, Issue 3, Pages 462–473

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The circadian clock is a ubiquitous timekeeping system that organizes the behavior and physiology of organisms over the day and night. Current models rely on transcriptional networks that coordinate circadian gene expression of thousands of transcripts. However, recent studies have uncovered phylogenetically conserved redox rhythms that can occur independently of transcriptional cycles. Here we identify the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), a critical source of the redox cofactor NADPH, as an important regulator of redox and transcriptional oscillations. Our results show that genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the PPP prolongs the period of circadian rhythms in human cells, mouse tissues, and fruit flies. These metabolic manipulations also cause a remodeling of circadian gene expression programs that involves the circadian transcription factors BMAL1 and CLOCK, and the redox-sensitive transcription factor NRF2. Thus, the PPP regulates circadian rhythms via NADPH metabolism, suggesting a pivotal role for NADPH availability in circadian timekeeping.


#150 Diabetes and Schizophrenia Link logo PDF logo

Suvisaari, Jaana; Keinanen, Jaakko; Eskelinen, Saana ; Mantere, Outi

Current Diabetes Reports Volume 16, Issue 2

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People with schizophrenia have 2- to 5-fold higher risk of type 2 diabetes than the general population. The traditional risk factors for type 2 diabetes, especially obesity, poor diet, and sedentary lifestyle, are common in people with schizophrenia already early in the course of illness. People with schizophrenia also often have low socioeconomic status and income, which affects their possibilities to make healthy lifestyle choices. Antipsychotic medications increase the risk of type 2 diabetes both directly by affecting insulin sensitivity and indirectly by causing weight gain. Lifestyle modification interventions for prevention of diabetes should be an integral part of treatment of patients with schizophrenia. In the treatment of type 2 diabetes in patients with schizophrenia, communication and collaboration between medical care and psychiatric treatment providers are essential.


#151 ARIA 2016: Care pathways implementing emerging technologies for predictive medicine in rhinitis and asthma across the life cycle Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Bousquet, J.; Hellings , P.W.; Agache, I.; Haahtela, T.; Kuitunen, M.; Olive-Elias, M. ; et al., ; Zidarn, M.

Clinical and Translational Allergy Volume 6, Issue 1

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The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) initiative commenced during a World Health Organization workshop in 1999. The initial goals were (1) to propose a new allergic rhinitis classification, (2) to promote the concept of multi-morbidity in asthma and rhinitis and (3) to develop guidelines with all stakeholders that could be used globally for all countries and populations. ARIA-disseminated and implemented in over 70 countries globally-is now focusing on the implementation of emerging technologies for individualized and predictive medicine. MASK [MACVIA (Contre les Maladies Chroniques pour un Vieillissement Actif)-ARIA Sentinel NetworK] uses mobile technology to develop care pathways for the management of rhinitis and asthma by a multi-disciplinary group and by patients themselves. An app (Android and iOS) is available in 20 countries and 15 languages. It uses a visual analogue scale to assess symptom control and work productivity as well as a clinical decision support system. It is associated with an inter-operable tablet for physicians and other health care professionals. The scaling up strategy uses the recommendations of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. The aim of the novel ARIA approach is to provide an active and healthy life to rhinitis sufferers, whatever their age, sex or socio-economic status, in order to reduce health and social inequalities incurred by the disease.


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