#1 Genetic studies of body mass index yield new insights for obesity biology Link logo

Locke, Adam E.; Kahali, Bratati; Berndt, Sonja I.; Justice, Anne E.; Pers, Tune H.; Day, Felix R.; Powell, Corey; Vedantam, Sailaja; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Yang, Jian; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Esko, Tonu; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gustafsson, Stefan

Nature Volume 518, Issue 7538, Pages 197–206

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Obesity is heritable and predisposes to many diseases. To understand the genetic basis of obesity better, here we conduct a genome-wide association study and Metabochip meta-analysis of body mass index (BMI), a measure commonly used to define obesity and assess adiposity, in up to 339,224 individuals. This analysis identifies 97 BMI-associated loci (P < 5 × 10(-8)), 56 of which are novel. Five loci demonstrate clear evidence of several independent association signals, and many loci have significant effects on other metabolic phenotypes. The 97 loci account for ∼2.7% of BMI variation, and genome-wide estimates suggest that common variation accounts for >20% of BMI variation. Pathway analyses provide strong support for a role of the central nervous system in obesity susceptibility and implicate new genes and pathways, including those related to synaptic function, glutamate signalling, insulin secretion/action, energy metabolism, lipid biology and adipogenesis.


#2 Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 301 acute and chronic diseases and injuries in 188 countries, 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. PDF logo

Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 Collaborators;Shiri R

The Lancet Volume 386, Issue 9995, Pages 743–800

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Up-to-date evidence about levels and trends in disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) is an essential input into global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), we estimated these quantities for acute and chronic diseases and injuries for 188 countries between 1990 and 2013. Estimates were calculated for disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and YLDs using GBD 2010 methods with some important refinements. Results for incidence of acute disorders and prevalence of chronic disorders are new additions to the analysis. Key improvements include expansion to the cause and sequelae list, updated systematic reviews, use of detailed injury codes, improvements to the Bayesian meta-regression method (DisMod-MR), and use of severity splits for various causes. An index of data representativeness, showing data availability, was calculated for each cause and impairment during three periods globally and at the country level for 2013. In total, 35 620 distinct sources of data were used and documented to calculated estimates for 301 diseases and injuries and 2337 sequelae. The comorbidity simulation provides estimates for the number of sequelae, concurrently, by individuals by country, year, age, and sex. Disability weights were updated with the addition of new population-based survey data from four countries. Disease and injury were highly prevalent; only a small fraction of individuals had no sequelae. Comorbidity rose substantially with age and in absolute terms from 1990 to 2013. Incidence of acute sequelae were predominantly infectious diseases and short-term injuries, with over 2 billion cases of upper respiratory infections and diarrhoeal disease episodes in 2013, with the notable exception of tooth pain due to permanent caries with more than 200 million incident cases in 2013. Conversely, leading chronic sequelae were largely attributable to non-communicable diseases, with prevalence estimates for asymptomatic permanent caries and tension-type headache of 2·4 billion and 1·6 billion, respectively. The distribution of the number of sequelae in populations varied widely across regions, with an expected relation between age and disease prevalence. YLDs for both sexes increased from 537·6 million in 1990 to 764·8 million in 2013 due to population growth and ageing, whereas the age-standardised rate decreased little from 114·87 per 1000 people to 110·31 per 1000 people between 1990 and 2013. Leading causes of YLDs included low back pain and major depressive disorder among the top ten causes of YLDs in every country. YLD rates per person, by major cause groups, indicated the main drivers of increases were due to musculoskeletal, mental, and substance use disorders, neurological disorders, and chronic respiratory diseases; however HIV/AIDS was a notable driver of increasing YLDs in sub-Saharan Africa. Also, the proportion of disability-adjusted life years due to YLDs increased globally from 21·1% in 1990 to 31·2% in 2013. Ageing of the world's population is leading to a substantial increase in the numbers of individuals with sequelae of diseases and injuries. Rates of YLDs are declining much more slowly than mortality rates. The non-fatal dimensions of disease and injury will require more and more attention from health systems. The transition to non-fatal outcomes as the dominant source of burden of disease is occurring rapidly outside of sub-Saharan Africa. Our results can guide future health initiatives through examination of epidemiological trends and a better understanding of variation across countries. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


#3 Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for 306 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 188 countries, 1990-2013: quantifying the epidemiological transition Link logo PDF logo

Murray Christopher JL, Barber Ryan M, Foreman Kyle J, Ozgoren Ayse Abbasoglu, Abd-Allah Foad, Abera Semaw F, Aboyans Victor, Abraham Jerry P, Abubakar Ibrahim, Abu-Raddad Laith J, Abu-Rmeileh Niveen M, Achoki Tom, Ackerman Ilena N, Ademi Zanfina, Adou Arsène K, Adsuar José C, Afshin Ashkan, Agardh Emilie E, Alam Sayed Saidul, Alasfoor Deena et al., GBD 2013 DALYs;HALE Collaborators (incl. Kivipelto Miia)

The Lancet Volume 386, Issue 10009, Pages 2145–2191

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The Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) aims to bring together all available epidemiological data using a coherent measurement framework, standardised estimation methods, and transparent data sources to enable comparisons of health loss over time and across causes, age-sex groups, and countries. The GBD can be used to generate summary measures such as disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and healthy life expectancy (HALE) that make possible comparative assessments of broad epidemiological patterns across countries and time. These summary measures can also be used to quantify the component of variation in epidemiology that is related to sociodemographic development. We used the published GBD 2013 data for age-specific mortality, years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLLs), and years lived with disability (YLDs) to calculate DALYs and HALE for 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2013 for 188 countries. We calculated HALE using the Sullivan method; 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs) represent uncertainty in age-specific death rates and YLDs per person for each country, age, sex, and year. We estimated DALYs for 306 causes for each country as the sum of YLLs and YLDs; 95% UIs represent uncertainty in YLL and YLD rates. We quantified patterns of the epidemiological transition with a composite indicator of sociodemographic status, which we constructed from income per person, average years of schooling after age 15 years, and the total fertility rate and mean age of the population. We applied hierarchical regression to DALY rates by cause across countries to decompose variance related to the sociodemographic status variable, country, and time. Worldwide, from 1990 to 2013, life expectancy at birth rose by 6·2 years (95% UI 5·6-6·6), from 65·3 years (65·0-65·6) in 1990 to 71·5 years (71·0-71·9) in 2013, HALE at birth rose by 5·4 years (4·9-5·8), from 56·9 years (54·5-59·1) to 62·3 years (59·7-64·8), total DALYs fell by 3·6% (0·3-7·4), and age-standardised DALY rates per 100 000 people fell by 26·7% (24·6-29·1). For communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional disorders, global DALY numbers, crude rates, and age-standardised rates have all declined between 1990 and 2013, whereas for non-communicable diseases, global DALYs have been increasing, DALY rates have remained nearly constant, and age-standardised DALY rates declined during the same period. From 2005 to 2013, the number of DALYs increased for most specific non-communicable diseases, including cardiovascular diseases and neoplasms, in addition to dengue, food-borne trematodes, and leishmaniasis; DALYs decreased for nearly all other causes. By 2013, the five leading causes of DALYs were ischaemic heart disease, lower respiratory infections, cerebrovascular disease, low back and neck pain, and road injuries. Sociodemographic status explained more than 50% of the variance between countries and over time for diarrhoea, lower respiratory infections, and other common infectious diseases; maternal disorders; neonatal disorders; nutritional deficiencies; other communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional diseases; musculoskeletal disorders; and other non-communicable diseases. However, sociodemographic status explained less than 10% of the variance in DALY rates for cardiovascular diseases; chronic respiratory diseases; cirrhosis; diabetes, urogenital, blood, and endocrine diseases; unintentional injuries; and self-harm and interpersonal violence. Predictably, increased sociodemographic status was associated with a shift in burden from YLLs to YLDs, driven by declines in YLLs and increases in YLDs from musculoskeletal disorders, neurological disorders, and mental and substance use disorders. In most country-specific estimates, the increase in life expectancy was greater than that in HALE. Leading causes of DALYs are highly variable across countries. Global health is improving. Population growth and ageing have driven up numbers of DALYs, but crude rates have remained relatively constant, showing that progress in health does not mean fewer demands on health systems. The notion of an epidemiological transition-in which increasing sociodemographic status brings structured change in disease burden-is useful, but there is tremendous variation in burden of disease that is not associated with sociodemographic status. This further underscores the need for country-specific assessments of DALYs and HALE to appropriately inform health policy decisions and attendant actions. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


#4 Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks in 188 countries, 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 Link logo PDF logo

Forouzanfar Mohammad H, Alexander Lily, Anderson H Ross, Bachman Victoria F, Biryukov Stan, Brauer Michael, Burnett Richard, Casey Daniel, Coates Matthew M, Cohen Aaron, Delwiche Kristen, Estep Kara, Frostad Joseph J, Kc Astha, Kyu Hmwe H, Moradi-Lakeh Maziar, Ng Marie, Slepak Erica Leigh, Thomas Bernadette A, Wagner Joseph et al. GBD 2013 Risk Factors Collaborators (incl. Kivipelto Miia)

The Lancet Volume 386, Issue 10010, Pages 2287–2323

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The Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factor study 2013 (GBD 2013) is the first of a series of annual updates of the GBD. Risk factor quantification, particularly of modifiable risk factors, can help to identify emerging threats to population health and opportunities for prevention. The GBD 2013 provides a timely opportunity to update the comparative risk assessment with new data for exposure, relative risks, and evidence on the appropriate counterfactual risk distribution. Attributable deaths, years of life lost, years lived with disability, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) have been estimated for 79 risks or clusters of risks using the GBD 2010 methods. Risk-outcome pairs meeting explicit evidence criteria were assessed for 188 countries for the period 1990-2013 by age and sex using three inputs: risk exposure, relative risks, and the theoretical minimum risk exposure level (TMREL). Risks are organised into a hierarchy with blocks of behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks at the first level of the hierarchy. The next level in the hierarchy includes nine clusters of related risks and two individual risks, with more detail provided at levels 3 and 4 of the hierarchy. Compared with GBD 2010, six new risk factors have been added: handwashing practices, occupational exposure to trichloroethylene, childhood wasting, childhood stunting, unsafe sex, and low glomerular filtration rate. For most risks, data for exposure were synthesised with a Bayesian meta-regression method, DisMod-MR 2.0, or spatial-temporal Gaussian process regression. Relative risks were based on meta-regressions of published cohort and intervention studies. Attributable burden for clusters of risks and all risks combined took into account evidence on the mediation of some risks such as high body-mass index (BMI) through other risks such as high systolic blood pressure and high cholesterol. All risks combined account for 57·2% (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 55·8-58·5) of deaths and 41·6% (40·1-43·0) of DALYs. Risks quantified account for 87·9% (86·5-89·3) of cardiovascular disease DALYs, ranging to a low of 0% for neonatal disorders and neglected tropical diseases and malaria. In terms of global DALYs in 2013, six risks or clusters of risks each caused more than 5% of DALYs: dietary risks accounting for 11·3 million deaths and 241·4 million DALYs, high systolic blood pressure for 10·4 million deaths and 208·1 million DALYs, child and maternal malnutrition for 1·7 million deaths and 176·9 million DALYs, tobacco smoke for 6·1 million deaths and 143·5 million DALYs, air pollution for 5·5 million deaths and 141·5 million DALYs, and high BMI for 4·4 million deaths and 134·0 million DALYs. Risk factor patterns vary across regions and countries and with time. In sub-Saharan Africa, the leading risk factors are child and maternal malnutrition, unsafe sex, and unsafe water, sanitation, and handwashing. In women, in nearly all countries in the Americas, north Africa, and the Middle East, and in many other high-income countries, high BMI is the leading risk factor, with high systolic blood pressure as the leading risk in most of Central and Eastern Europe and south and east Asia. For men, high systolic blood pressure or tobacco use are the leading risks in nearly all high-income countries, in north Africa and the Middle East, Europe, and Asia. For men and women, unsafe sex is the leading risk in a corridor from Kenya to South Africa. Behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks can explain half of global mortality and more than one-third of global DALYs providing many opportunities for prevention. Of the larger risks, the attributable burden of high BMI has increased in the past 23 years. In view of the prominence of behavioural risk factors, behavioural and social science research on interventions for these risks should be strengthened. Many prevention and primary care policy options are available now to act on key risks. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


#5 Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease Link logo PDF logo

Heneka Michael T, Carson Monica J, El Khoury Joseph, Landreth Gary E, Brosseron Frederic, Feinstein Douglas L, Jacobs Andreas H, Wyss-Coray Tony, Vitorica Javier, Ransohoff Richard M, Herrup Karl, Frautschy Sally A, Finsen Bente, Brown Guy C, Verkhratsky Alexei, Yamanaka Koji, Koistinaho Jari, Latz Eicke, Halle Annett, Petzold Gabor C et al

Lancet Neurology Volume 14, Issue 4, Pages 388–405

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Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and trigger an innate immune response characterised by release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome-wide analysis suggests that several genes that increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease encode factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded proteins and the inflammatory reaction. External factors, including systemic inflammation and obesity, are likely to interfere with immunological processes of the brain and further promote disease progression. Modulation of risk factors and targeting of these immune mechanisms could lead to future therapeutic or preventive strategies for Alzheimer's disease.


#6 Care episode retrieval: distributional semantic models for information retrieval in the clinical domain PDF logo

Moen H; Ginter F; Marsi E; Peltonen L-M; Salakoski T; Salanterä S

BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making

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Patients' health related information is stored in electronic health records (EHRs) by health service providers. These records include sequential documentation of care episodes in the form of clinical notes. EHRs are used throughout the health care sector by professionals, administrators and patients, primarily for clinical purposes, but also for secondary purposes such as decision support and research. The vast amounts of information in EHR systems complicate information management and increase the risk of information overload. Therefore, clinicians and researchers need new tools to manage the information stored in the EHRs. A common use case is, given a - possibly unfinished - care episode, to retrieve the most similar care episodes among the records. This paper presents several methods for information retrieval, focusing on care episode retrieval, based on textual similarity, where similarity is measured through domain-specific modelling of the distributional semantics of words. Models include variants of random indexing and the semantic neural network model word2vec. Two novel methods are introduced that utilize the ICD-10 codes attached to care episodes to better induce domain-specificity in the semantic model. We report on experimental evaluation of care episode retrieval that circumvents the lack of human judgements regarding episode relevance. Results suggest that several of the methods proposed outperform a state-of-the art search engine (Lucene) on the retrieval task.


#7 A 2 year multidomain intervention of diet, exercise, cognitive training, and vascular risk monitoring versus control to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people (FINGER): a randomised controlled trial PDF logo

Ngandu T;Lehtisalo J;Solomon A;Levälahti E;Ahtiluoto S;Antikainen R;Bäckman L;Hänninen T;Jula A;Laatikainen T;Lindström J;Mangialasche F;Paajanen T;Pajala S;Peltonen M;Rauramaa R;Stigsdotter-Neely A;Strandberg T;Tuomilehto J;Soininen H;Kivipelto M

The Lancet Volume 385, Issue 9984, Pages 2255–2263

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Modifiable vascular and lifestyle-related risk factors have been associated with dementia risk in observational studies. In the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER), a proof-of-concept randomised controlled trial, we aimed to assess a multidomain approach to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people from the general population.


#8 The evolutionary history of lethal metastatic prostate cancer Link logo

Gundem Gunes; Van Loo Peter; Kremeyer Barbara; Alexandrov Ludmil B; Tubio Jose M; Papaemmanuil Elli; Brewer Daniel S; Kallio Heini M; Högnäs Gunilla; Annala Matti; Kivinummi Kati; Goody Victoria; Latimer Calli; O'Meara Sarah; Dawson Kevin J; Isaacs William; Emmert-Buck Michael R; Nykter Matti; Foster Christopher; Kote-Jarai Zsofia; Easton Douglas; Whitaker Hayley C; ICGC Prostate UK Group; Neal David E; Cooper Colin S; Eeles Rosalind A; Visakorpi Tapio; Campbell Peter J; McDermott Ultan; Wedge D

Nature Volume 520, Issue 7547, Pages 353–357

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Cancers emerge from an ongoing Darwinian evolutionary process, often leading to multiple competing subclones within a single primary tumour. This evolutionary process culminates in the formation of metastases, which is the cause of 90% of cancer-related deaths. However, despite its clinical importance, little is known about the principles governing the dissemination of cancer cells to distant organs. Although the hypothesis that each metastasis originates from a single tumour cell is generally supported, recent studies using mouse models of cancer demonstrated the existence of polyclonal seeding from and interclonal cooperation between multiple subclones. Here we sought definitive evidence for the existence of polyclonal seeding in human malignancy and to establish the clonal relationship among different metastases in the context of androgen-deprived metastatic prostate cancer. Using whole-genome sequencing, we characterized multiple metastases arising from prostate tumours in ten patients. Integrated analyses of subclonal architecture revealed the patterns of metastatic spread in unprecedented detail. Metastasis-to-metastasis spread was found to be common, either through de novo monoclonal seeding of daughter metastases or, in five cases, through the transfer of multiple tumour clones between metastatic sites. Lesions affecting tumour suppressor genes usually occur as single events, whereas mutations in genes involved in androgen receptor signalling commonly involve multiple, convergent events in different metastases. Our results elucidate in detail the complex patterns of metastatic spread and further our understanding of the development of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy in prostate cancer.


#9 New genetic loci link adipose and insulin biology to body fat distribution Link logo

Shungin Dmitry; Winkler Thomas W; Croteau-Chonka Damien C; Ferreira Teresa; Locke Adam E; Mägi Reedik; Strawbridge Rona J; Pers Tune H; Fischer Krista; Justice Anne E; Workalemahu Tsegaselassie; Wu Joseph M; Buchkovich Martin L; Heard-Costa Nancy L; Roman Tamara S; Drong Alexander W; Song Ci; Gustafsson Stefan; Day Felix R; Esko Tonu et al

Nature Volume 518, Issue 7538, Pages 187–196

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Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, here we conduct genome-wide association meta-analyses of traits related to waist and hip circumferences in up to 224,459 individuals. We identify 49 loci (33 new) associated with waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (BMI), and an additional 19 loci newly associated with related waist and hip circumference measures (P < 5 × 10(-8)). In total, 20 of the 49 waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI loci show significant sexual dimorphism, 19 of which display a stronger effect in women. The identified loci were enriched for genes expressed in adipose tissue and for putative regulatory elements in adipocytes. Pathway analyses implicated adipogenesis, angiogenesis, transcriptional regulation and insulin resistance as processes affecting fat distribution, providing insight into potential pathophysiological mechanisms.


#10 Global surveillance of cancer survival 1995-2009: analysis of individual data for 25,676,887 patients from 279 population-based registries in 67 countries (CONCORD-2) Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Allemani Claudia; Weir Hannah K; Carreira Helena; Harewood Rhea; Spika Devon; Wang Xiao-Si; Bannon Finian; Ahn Jane V; Johnson Christopher J; Bonaventure Audrey; Marcos-Gragera Rafael; Stiller Charles; Azevedo e Silva Gulnar; Chen Wan-Qing; Ogunbiyi Olufemi J; Rachet Bernard; Soeberg Matthew J; You Hui; Matsuda Tomohiro; Bielska-Lasota Magdalena; Storm Hans; Tucker Thomas C; Coleman Michel P

The Lancet Volume 385, Issue 9972, Pages 977–1010

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Worldwide data for cancer survival are scarce. We aimed to initiate worldwide surveillance of cancer survival by central analysis of population-based registry data, as a metric of the effectiveness of health systems, and to inform global policy on cancer control.


#11 LD Score regression distinguishes confounding from polygenicity in genome-wide association studies Link logo

Bulik-Sullivan BK; Loh PR; Finucane HK; Ripke S; Veijola J

Nature Genetics Volume 47, Issue 3, Pages 291–295

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Both polygenicity (many small genetic effects) and confounding biases, such as cryptic relatedness and population stratification, can yield an inflated distribution of test statistics in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, current methods cannot distinguish between inflation from a true polygenic signal and bias. We have developed an approach, LD Score regression, that quantifies the contribution of each by examining the relationship between test statistics and linkage disequilibrium (LD). The LD Score regression intercept can be used to estimate a more powerful and accurate correction factor than genomic control. We find strong evidence that polygenicity accounts for the majority of the inflation in test statistics in many GWAS of large sample size.


#12 Metagenomics meets time series analysis:unraveling microbial community dynamics Link logo

Faust, Karoline; Lahti, Leo; Gonze, Didier; de Vos, Willem M.; Raes, Jeroen

Current Opinion in Microbiology

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The recent increase in the number of microbial time series studies offers new insights into the stability and dynamics of microbial communities, from the world's oceans to human microbiota. Dedicated time series analysis tools allow taking full advantage of these data. Such tools can reveal periodic patterns, help to build predictive models or, on the contrary, quantify irregularities that make community behavior unpredictable. Microbial communities can change abruptly in response to small perturbations, linked to changing conditions or the presence of multiple stable states. With sufficient samples or time points, such alternative states can be detected. In addition, temporal variation of microbial interactions can be captured with time-varying networks. Here, we apply these techniques on multiple longitudinal datasets to illustrate their potential for microbiome research.


#13 Tackling antibiotic resistance: the environmental framework

Berendonk TU; Manaia CM; Merlin C; Fatta-Kassinos D; Cytryn E; Walsh F; Bürgmann H; Sørum H; Norström M; Pons MN; Kreuzinger N; Huovinen P; Stefani S; Schwartz T; Kisand V; Baquero F; Martinez J

Nature Reviews Microbiology

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Antibiotic resistance is a threat to human and animal health worldwide, and key measures are required to reduce the risks posed by antibiotic resistance genes that occur in the environment. These measures include the identification of critical points of control, the development of reliable surveillance and risk assessment procedures, and the implementation of technological solutions that can prevent environmental contamination with antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes. In this Opinion article, we discuss the main knowledge gaps, the future research needs and the policy and management options that should be prioritized to tackle antibiotic resistance in the environment.


#14 Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for 306 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 188 countries, 1990-2013:quantifying the epidemiological transition PDF logo

Murray, Christopher J. L.; Barber, Ryan M.; Foreman, Kyle J.; Lallukka, Tea; Meretoja, Atte; , ; ,

The Lancet Volume 388, Issue 10053, Pages 1603–1658

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Healthy life expectancy (HALE) and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) provide summary measures of health across geographies and time that can inform assessments of epidemiological patterns and health system performance, help to prioritise investments in research and development, and monitor progress toward the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We aimed to provide updated HALE and DALYs for geographies worldwide and evaluate how disease burden changes with development. We used results from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015) for all-cause mortality, cause-specific mortality, and non-fatal disease burden to derive HALE and DALYs by sex for 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2015. We calculated DALYs by summing years of life lost (YLLs) and years of life lived with disability (YLDs) for each geography, age group, sex, and year. We estimated HALE using the Sullivan method, which draws from age-specific death rates and YLDs per capita. We then assessed how observed levels of DALYs and HALE differed from expected trends calculated with the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a composite indicator constructed from measures of income per capita, average years of schooling, and total fertility rate. Total global DALYs remained largely unchanged from 1990 to 2015, with decreases in communicable, neonatal, maternal, and nutritional (Group 1) disease DALYs offset by increased DALYs due to non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Much of this epidemiological transition was caused by changes in population growth and ageing, but it was accelerated by widespread improvements in SDI that also correlated strongly with the increasing importance of NCDs. Both total DALYs and age-standardised DALY rates due to most Group 1 causes significantly decreased by 2015, and although total burden climbed for the majority of NCDs, age-standardised DALY rates due to NCDs declined. Nonetheless, age-standardised DALY rates due to several high-burden NCDs (including osteoarthritis, drug use disorders, depression, diabetes, congenital birth defects, and skin, oral, and sense organ diseases) either increased or remained unchanged, leading to increases in their relative ranking in many geographies. From 2005 to 2015, HALE at birth increased by an average of 2·9 years (95% uncertainty interval 2·9-3·0) for men and 3·5 years (3·4-3·7) for women, while HALE at age 65 years improved by 0·85 years (0·78-0·92) and 1·2 years (1·1-1·3), respectively. Rising SDI was associated with consistently higher HALE and a somewhat smaller proportion of life spent with functional health loss; however, rising SDI was related to increases in total disability. Many countries and territories in central America and eastern sub-Saharan Africa had increasingly lower rates of disease burden than expected given their SDI. At the same time, a subset of geographies recorded a growing gap between observed and expected levels of DALYs, a trend driven mainly by rising burden due to war, interpersonal violence, and various NCDs. Health is improving globally, but this means more populations are spending more time with functional health loss, an absolute expansion of morbidity. The proportion of life spent in ill health decreases somewhat with increasing SDI, a relative compression of morbidity, which supports continued efforts to elevate personal income, improve education, and limit fertility. Our analysis of DALYs and HALE and their relationship to SDI represents a robust framework on which to benchmark geography-specific health performance and SDG progress. Country-specific drivers of disease burden, particularly for causes with higher-than-expected DALYs, should inform financial and research investments, prevention efforts, health policies, and health system improvement initiatives for all countries along the development continuum. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


#15 Nivolumab in Previously Untreated Melanoma without BRAF Mutation Link logo

Robert, Caroline; Long, Georgina V.; Brady, Benjamin; Dutriaux, Caroline; Maio, Michele; Mortier, Laurent; Hassel, Jessica C.; Rutkowski, Piotr; McNeil, Catriona; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Savage, Kerry J.; Hernberg, Micaela M.; Lebbe, Celeste; Charles, Juli

New England Journal of Medicine Volume 372, Issue 4, Pages 141116004513004–330

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#16 Global, regional, and national age-sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990-2013 : a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

GBD 2013 Mortality;Causes of Death Collaborators incl. Miia Kivipelto

The Lancet Volume 385, Issue 9963, Pages 117–171

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Up-to-date evidence on levels and trends for age-sex-specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality is essential for the formation of global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) we estimated yearly deaths for 188 countries between 1990, and 2013. We used the results to assess whether there is epidemiological convergence across countries.


#17 Clinical Features and Outcomes of Takotsubo (Stress) Cardiomyopathy

Templin C, Ghadri JR, Diekmann J, Napp LC, Bataiosu DR, Jaguszewski M, Cammann VL, Sarcon A, Geyer V, Neumann CA, Seifert B, Hellermann J, Schwyzer M, Eisenhardt K, Jenewein J, Franke J, Katus HA, Burgdorf C, Schunkert H, Moeller C, Thiele H, Bauersachs J, Tschope C, Schultheiss HP, Laney CA, Rajan L, Michels G, Pfister R, Ukena C, Bohm M, Erbel R, Cuneo A, Kuck KH, Jacobshagen C, Hasenfuss G, Karakas M, Koenig W, Rottbauer W, Said SM, Braun-Dullaeus RC, Cuculi F, Banning A, Fischer TA, Vasankari T, Airaksinen KEJ, Fijalkowski M, Rynkiewicz A, Pawlak M, Opolski G, Dworakowski R, MacCarthy P, Kaiser C, Osswald S, Galiuto L, Crea F, Dichtl W, Franz WM, Empen K, Felix SB, Delmas C, Lairez O, Erne P, Bax JJ, Ford I, Ruschitzka F, Prasad A, Luscher TF

New England Journal of Medicine Volume 373, Issue 10, Pages 929–938

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The natural history, management, and outcome of takotsubo (stress) cardiomyopathy are incompletely understood. The International Takotsubo Registry, a consortium of 26 centers in Europe and the United States, was established to investigate clinical features, prognostic predictors, and outcome of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Patients were compared with age- and sex-matched patients who had an acute coronary syndrome. Of 1750 patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, 89.8% were women (mean age, 66.8 years). Emotional triggers were not as common as physical triggers (27.7% vs. 36.0%), and 28.5% of patients had no evident trigger. Among patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, as compared with an acute coronary syndrome, rates of neurologic or psychiatric disorders were higher (55.8% vs. 25.7%) and the mean left ventricular ejection fraction was markedly lower (40.7±11.2% vs. 51.5±12.3%) (P<0.001 for both comparisons). Rates of severe in-hospital complications including shock and death were similar in the two groups (P=0.93). Physical triggers, acute neurologic or psychiatric diseases, high troponin levels, and a low ejection fraction on admission were independent predictors for in-hospital complications. During long-term follow-up, the rate of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events was 9.9% per patient-year, and the rate of death was 5.6% per patient-year. Patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy had a higher prevalence of neurologic or psychiatric disorders than did those with an acute coronary syndrome. This condition represents an acute heart failure syndrome with substantial morbidity and mortality. (Funded by the Mach-Gaensslen Foundation and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01947621.).


#18 Consumption of sugar sweetened beverages, artificially sweetened beverages, and fruit juice and incidence of type 2 diabetes: systematic review, meta-analysis, and estimation of population attributable fraction Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Imamura Fumiaki, O'Connor Laura, Ye Zheng, Mursu Jaakko, Hayashino Yasuaki, Bhupathiraju Shilpa N, Forouhi Nita G

British Medical Journal

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  • 38 news
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To examine the prospective associations between consumption of sugar sweetened beverages, artificially sweetened beverages, and fruit juice with type 2 diabetes before and after adjustment for adiposity, and to estimate the population attributable fraction for type 2 diabetes from consumption of sugar sweetened beverages in the United States and United Kingdom. Systematic review and meta-analysis. PubMed, Embase, Ovid, and Web of Knowledge for prospective studies of adults without diabetes, published until February 2014. The population attributable fraction was estimated in national surveys in the USA, 2009-10 (n=4729 representing 189.1 million adults without diabetes) and the UK, 2008-12 (n=1932 representing 44.7 million). Random effects meta-analysis and survey analysis for population attributable fraction associated with consumption of sugar sweetened beverages. Prespecified information was extracted from 17 cohorts (38 253 cases/10 126 754 person years). Higher consumption of sugar sweetened beverages was associated with a greater incidence of type 2 diabetes, by 18% per one serving/day (95% confidence interval 9% to 28%, I(2) for heterogeneity=89%) and 13% (6% to 21%, I(2)=79%) before and after adjustment for adiposity; for artificially sweetened beverages, 25% (18% to 33%, I(2)=70%) and 8% (2% to 15%, I(2)=64%); and for fruit juice, 5% (-1% to 11%, I(2)=58%) and 7% (1% to 14%, I(2)=51%). Potential sources of heterogeneity or bias were not evident for sugar sweetened beverages. For artificially sweetened beverages, publication bias and residual confounding were indicated. For fruit juice the finding was non-significant in studies ascertaining type 2 diabetes objectively (P for heterogeneity=0.008). Under specified assumptions for population attributable fraction, of 20.9 million events of type 2 diabetes predicted to occur over 10 years in the USA (absolute event rate 11.0%), 1.8 million would be attributable to consumption of sugar sweetened beverages (population attributable fraction 8.7%, 95% confidence interval 3.9% to 12.9%); and of 2.6 million events in the UK (absolute event rate 5.8%), 79 000 would be attributable to consumption of sugar sweetened beverages (population attributable fraction 3.6%, 1.7% to 5.6%). Habitual consumption of sugar sweetened beverages was associated with a greater incidence of type 2 diabetes, independently of adiposity. Although artificially sweetened beverages and fruit juice also showd positive associations with incidence of type 2 diabetes, the findings were likely to involve bias. None the less, both artificially sweetened beverages and fruit juice were unlikely to be healthy alternatives to sugar sweetened beverages for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Under assumption of causality, consumption of sugar sweetened beverages over years may be related to a substantial number of cases of new onset diabetes.


#19 Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures Open access logo Link logo

Hibar Derrek P, Stein Jason L, Renteria Miguel E, Arias-Vasquez Alejandro, Desrivières Sylvane, Jahanshad Neda, Toro Roberto, Wittfeld Katharina, Abramovic Lucija, Andersson Micael, Aribisala Benjamin S, Armstrong Nicola J, Bernard Manon, Bohlken Marc M, Boks Marco P, Bralten Janita, Brown Andrew A, Chakravarty M Mallar, Qiang Chen, Ching Christopher RK et al. (incl. Hilkka Soininen)

Nature Volume 520, Issue 7546, Pages 224–229

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The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.


#20 Effect of Sitagliptin on Cardiovascular Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes

Green JB, Bethel MA, Armstrong PW, Buse JB, Engel SS, Garg J, Josse R, Kaufman KD, Koglin J, Korn S, Lachin JM, McGuire DK, Pencina MJ, Standl E, Stein PP, Suryawanshi S, Van de Werf F, Peterson ED, Holman RR; for the TECOS Study Group

New England Journal of Medicine Volume 373, Issue 3, Pages 232–242

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Background Data are lacking on the long-term effect on cardiovascular events of adding sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor, to usual care in patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Methods In this randomized, double-blind study, we assigned 14,671 patients to add either sitagliptin or placebo to their existing therapy. Open-label use of antihyperglycemic therapy was encouraged as required, aimed at reaching individually appropriate glycemic targets in all patients. To determine whether sitagliptin was noninferior to placebo, we used a relative risk of 1.3 as the marginal upper boundary. The primary cardiovascular outcome was a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or hospitalization for unstable angina. Results During a median follow-up of 3.0 years, there was a small difference in glycated hemoglobin levels (least-squares mean difference for sitagliptin vs. placebo, -0.29 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.32 to -0.27). Overall, the primary outcome occurred in 839 patients in the sitagliptin group (11.4%; 4.06 per 100 person-years) and 851 patients in the placebo group (11.6%; 4.17 per 100 person-years). Sitagliptin was noninferior to placebo for the primary composite cardiovascular outcome (hazard ratio, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.88 to 1.09; P<0.001). Rates of hospitalization for heart failure did not differ between the two groups (hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.20; P=0.98). There were no significant between-group differences in rates of acute pancreatitis (P=0.07) or pancreatic cancer (P=0.32). Conclusions Among patients with type 2 diabetes and established cardiovascular disease, adding sitagliptin to usual care did not appear to increase the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events, hospitalization for heart failure, or other adverse events. (Funded by Merck Sharp & Dohme; TECOS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00790205 .).


#21 ConStrains identifies microbial strains in metagenomic datasets Link logo

Luo, Chengwei; Knight, Rob; Siljander, Heli; Knip, Mikael; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Gevers, Dirk

Nature Biotechnology Volume 33, Issue 10, Pages 1045–1052

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An important fraction of microbial diversity is harbored in strain individuality, so identification of conspecific bacterial strains is imperative for improved understanding of microbial community functions. Limitations in bioinformatics and sequencing technologies have to date precluded strain identification owing to difficulties in phasing short reads to faithfully recover the original strain-level genotypes, which have highly similar sequences. We present ConStrains, an open-source algorithm that identifies conspecific strains from metagenomic sequence data and reconstructs the phylogeny of these strains in microbial communities. The algorithm uses single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) patterns in a set of universal genes to infer within-species structures that represent strains. Applying ConStrains to simulated and host-derived datasets provides insights into microbial community dynamics.


#22 Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord, roots and peripheral nerves: Basic principles and procedures for routine clinical and research application: An updated report from an I.F.C.N. Committee Link logo PDF logo

Rossini PM, Burke D, Chen R, Cohen LG, Daskalakis Z, Di Iorio R, Di Lazzaro V, Ferreri F, Fitzgerald PB, George MS, Hallett M, Lefaucheur JP, Langguth B, Matsumoto H, Miniussi C, Nitsche MA, Pascual-Leone A, Paulus W, Rossi S, Rothwell JC, Siebner HR, Ugawa Y, Walsh V, Ziemann U

Clinical Neurophysiology

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These guidelines provide an up-date of previous IFCN report on "Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord and roots: basic principles and procedures for routine clinical application" (Rossini et al., 1994). A new Committee, composed of international experts, some of whom were in the panel of the 1994 "Report", was selected to produce a current state-of-the-art review of non-invasive stimulation both for clinical application and research in neuroscience. Since 1994, the international scientific community has seen a rapid increase in non-invasive brain stimulation in studying cognition, brain-behavior relationship and pathophysiology of various neurologic and psychiatric disorders. New paradigms of stimulation and new techniques have been developed. Furthermore, a large number of studies and clinical trials have demonstrated potential therapeutic applications of non-invasive brain stimulation, especially for TMS. Recent guidelines can be found in the literature covering specific aspects of non-invasive brain stimulation, such as safety (Rossi et al., 2009), methodology (Groppa et al., 2012) and therapeutic applications (Lefaucheur et al., 2014). This up-dated review covers theoretical, physiological and practical aspects of non-invasive stimulation of brain, spinal cord, nerve roots and peripheral nerves in the light of more updated knowledge, and include some recent extensions and developments.


#23 Directional dominance on stature and cognition in diverse human populations Link logo

Joshi, Peter K.; Esko, Tonu; Mattsson, Hannele; Eklund, Niina; Gandin, Ilaria; Nutile, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U.; Schurmann, Claudia; Smith, Albert V.; Zhang, Weihua; Okada, Yukinori; Stancakova, Alena; Faul, Jessica D.; Zhao, Wei; Bartz, Traci M.; Concas,

Nature Volume 523, Issue 7561, Pages 459–462

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Homozygosity has long been associated with rare, often devastating, Mendelian disorders, and Darwin was one of the first to recognize that inbreeding reduces evolutionary fitness. However, the effect of the more distant parental relatedness that is common in modern human populations is less well understood. Genomic data now allow us to investigate the effects of homozygosity on traits of public health importance by observing contiguous homozygous segments (runs of homozygosity), which are inferred to be homozygous along their complete length. Given the low levels of genome-wide homozygosity prevalent in most human populations, information is required on very large numbers of people to provide sufficient power. Here we use runs of homozygosity to study 16 health-related quantitative traits in 354,224 individuals from 102 cohorts, and find statistically significant associations between summed runs of homozygosity and four complex traits: height, forced expiratory lung volume in one second, general cognitive ability and educational attainment (P < 1 × 10(-300), 2.1 × 10(-6), 2.5 × 10(-10) and 1.8 × 10(-10), respectively). In each case, increased homozygosity was associated with decreased trait value, equivalent to the offspring of first cousins being 1.2 cm shorter and having 10 months' less education. Similar effect sizes were found across four continental groups and populations with different degrees of genome-wide homozygosity, providing evidence that homozygosity, rather than confounding, directly contributes to phenotypic variance. Contrary to earlier reports in substantially smaller samples, no evidence was seen of an influence of genome-wide homozygosity on blood pressure and low density lipoprotein cholesterol, or ten other cardio-metabolic traits. Since directional dominance is predicted for traits under directional evolutionary selection, this study provides evidence that increased stature and cognitive function have been positively selected in human evolution, whereas many important risk factors for late-onset complex diseases may not have been.


#24 Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603 838 individuals PDF logo

Kivimaki M, Jokela M, Nyberg ST, Singh-Manoux A, Fransson EI, Alfredsson L, Bjorner JB, Borritz M, Burr H, Casini A, Clays E, De Bacquer D, Dragano N, Erbel R, Geuskens GA, Hamer M, Hooftman WE, Houtman IL, Jockel KH, Kittel F, Knutsson A, Koskenvuo M, Lunau T, Madsen IEH, Nielsen ML, Nordin M, Oksanen T, Pejtersen JH, Pentti J, Rugulies R, Salo P, Shipley MJ, Siegrist J, Steptoe A, Suominen SB, Theorell T, Vahtera J, Westerholm PJM, Westerlund H, O'Reilly D, Kumari M, Batty GD, Ferrie JE, Virtanen M

The Lancet Volume 386, Issue 10005, Pages 1739–1746

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Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. We identified published studies through a systematic review of PubMed and Embase from inception to Aug 20, 2014. We obtained unpublished data for 20 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium and open-access data archives. We used cumulative random-effects meta-analysis to combine effect estimates from published and unpublished data. We included 25 studies from 24 cohorts in Europe, the USA, and Australia. The meta-analysis of coronary heart disease comprised data for 603 838 men and women who were free from coronary heart disease at baseline; the meta-analysis of stroke comprised data for 528 908 men and women who were free from stroke at baseline. Follow-up for coronary heart disease was 5·1 million person-years (mean 8·5 years), in which 4768 events were recorded, and for stroke was 3·8 million person-years (mean 7·2 years), in which 1722 events were recorded. In cumulative meta-analysis adjusted for age, sex, and socioeconomic status, compared with standard hours (35-40 h per week), working long hours (≥55 h per week) was associated with an increase in risk of incident coronary heart disease (relative risk [RR] 1·13, 95% CI 1·02-1·26; p=0·02) and incident stroke (1·33, 1·11-1·61; p=0·002). The excess risk of stroke remained unchanged in analyses that addressed reverse causation, multivariable adjustments for other risk factors, and different methods of stroke ascertainment (range of RR estimates 1·30-1·42). We recorded a dose-response association for stroke, with RR estimates of 1·10 (95% CI 0·94-1·28; p=0·24) for 41-48 working hours, 1·27 (1·03-1·56; p=0·03) for 49-54 working hours, and 1·33 (1·11-1·61; p=0·002) for 55 working hours or more per week compared with standard working hours (ptrend<0·0001). Employees who work long hours have a higher risk of stroke than those working standard hours; the association with coronary heart disease is weaker. These findings suggest that more attention should be paid to the management of vascular risk factors in individuals who work long hours. Medical Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council, European Union New and Emerging Risks in Occupational Safety and Health research programme, Finnish Work Environment Fund, Swedish Research Council for Working Life and Social Research, German Social Accident Insurance, Danish National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Academy of Finland, Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment (Netherlands), US National Institutes of Health, British Heart Foundation.


#25 Pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer Open access logo Link logo

Swain Sandra M; Baselga José; Kim Sung-Bae; Ro Jungsil; Semiglazov Vladimir; Campone Mario; Ciruelos Eva; Ferrero Jean-Marc; Schneeweiss Andreas; Heeson Sarah; Clark Emma; Ross Graham; Benyunes Mark C; Cortés Javies; CLEOPATRA Study Group.

New England Journal of Medicine Volume 372, Issue 8, Pages 724–734

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In patients with metastatic breast cancer that is positive for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), progression-free survival was significantly improved after first-line therapy with pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel, as compared with placebo, trastuzumab, and docetaxel. Overall survival was significantly improved with pertuzumab in an interim analysis without the median being reached. We report final prespecified overall survival results with a median follow-up of 50 months.


#26 Novel molecular mechanisms of dendritic spine development Open access logo Link logo

Llano, Olaya

Progress in Neurobiology

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Dendritic spines are small protrusions that cover the surface of dendrites and bear the postsynaptic component of excitatory synapses. Having an enlarged head connected to the dendrite by a narrow neck, dendritic spines provide a postsynaptic biochemical compartment that separates the synaptic space from the dendritic shaft and allows each spine to function as a partially independent unit. Spines develop around the time of synaptogenesis and are dynamic structures that continue to undergo remodeling over time. Changes in spine morphology and density influence the properties of neural circuits. Our knowledge of the structure and function of dendritic spines has progressed significantly since their discovery over a century ago, but many uncertainties still remain. For example, several different models have been put forth outlining the sequence of events that lead to the genesis of a spine. Although spines are small and apparently simple organelles with a cytoskeleton mainly composed of actin filaments, regulation of their morphology and physiology appears to be quite sophisticated. A multitude of molecules have been implicated in dendritic spine development and remodeling, suggesting that intricate networks of interconnected signaling pathways converge to regulate actin dynamics in spines. This complexity is not surprising, given the likely importance of dendritic spines in higher brain functions. In this review, we discuss the molecules that are currently known to mediate the exquisite sensitivity of spines to perturbations in their environment and we outline how these molecules interface with each other to mediate cascades of signals flowing from the spine surface to the actin cytoskeleton.


#27 European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2015 Section 3. Adult advanced life support PDF logo

Soar, Jasmeet; Nolan, Jerry P.; Boettiger, Bernd W.; Perkins, Gavin D.; Lott, Carsten; Carli, Pierre; Pellis, Tommaso; Sandroni, Claudio; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Smith, Gary B.; Sunde, Kjetil; Deakin, Charles D.; ,

Resuscitation Volume 81, Issue 10, Pages 1305–1352

  • 1 blog post
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#28 The gut microbiota and inflammatory noncommunicable diseases: Associations and potentials for gut microbiota therapies PDF logo

West CE, Renz H, Jenmalm MC, Kozyrskyj AL, Allen KJ, Vuillermin P, Prescott SL, MacKay C, Salminen S, Wong G, Sinn J, Stokholm J, Bisgaard H, Pawankar R, Noakes P, Kesper D, Tulic M; on behalf of the in-FLAME Microbiome Interest Group

The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Volume 135, Issue 1, Pages 3–13

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  • 254 Mendeley readers

Rapid environmental transition and modern lifestyles are likely driving changes in the biodiversity of the human gut microbiota. With clear effects on physiologic, immunologic, and metabolic processes in human health, aberrations in the gut microbiome and intestinal homeostasis have the capacity for multisystem effects. Changes in microbial composition are implicated in the increasing propensity for a broad range of inflammatory diseases, such as allergic disease, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), obesity, and associated noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). There are also suggestive implications for neurodevelopment and mental health. These diverse multisystem influences have sparked interest in strategies that might favorably modulate the gut microbiota to reduce the risk of many NCDs. For example, specific prebiotics promote favorable intestinal colonization, and their fermented products have anti-inflammatory properties. Specific probiotics also have immunomodulatory and metabolic effects. However, when evaluated in clinical trials, the effects are variable, preliminary, or limited in magnitude. Fecal microbiota transplantation is another emerging therapy that regulates inflammation in experimental models. In human subjects it has been successfully used in cases of Clostridium difficile infection and IBD, although controlled trials are lacking for IBD. Here we discuss relationships between gut colonization and inflammatory NCDs and gut microbiota modulation strategies for their treatment and prevention.


#29 RNA-Seq workflow: gene-level exploratory analysis and differential expression [version 1; referees: 2 approved] Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Love, Michael I; Anders, Simon; Kim, Vladislav; Huber, Wolfgang

F1000 Research

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Here we walk through an end-to-end gene-level RNA-Seq differential expression workflow using Bioconductor packages. We will start from the FASTQ files, show how these were aligned to the reference genome, and prepare a count matrix which tallies the number of RNA-seq reads/fragments within each gene for each sample. We will perform exploratory data analysis (EDA) for quality assessment and to explore the relationship between samples, perform differential gene expression analysis, and visually explore the results.


#30 Gut Microbiota Are Related to Parkinson's Disease and Clinical Phenotype Link logo PDF logo

Scheperjans, Filip; Aho, Velma; Pereira, Pedro A. B.; Koskinen, Kaisa; Paulin, Lars; Pekkonen, Eero; Haapaniemi, Elena; Kaakkola, Seppo; Eerola-Rautio, Johanna; Pohja, Marjatta; Kinnunen, Esko; Murros, Kari; Auvinen, Petri

Movement Disorders Volume 30, Issue 3, Pages 350–358

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In the course of Parkinson's disease (PD), the enteric nervous system (ENS) and parasympathetic nerves are amongst the structures earliest and most frequently affected by alpha-synuclein pathology. Accordingly, gastrointestinal dysfunction, in particular constipation, is an important non-motor symptom in PD and often precedes the onset of motor symptoms by years. Recent research has shown that intestinal microbiota interact with the autonomic and central nervous system via diverse pathways including the ENS and vagal nerve. The gut microbiome in PD has not been previously investigated. We compared the fecal microbiomes of 72 PD patients and 72 control subjects by pyrosequencing the V1-V3 regions of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Associations between clinical parameters and microbiota were analyzed using generalized linear models, taking into account potential confounders. On average, the abundance of Prevotellaceae in feces of PD patients was reduced by 77.6% as compared with controls. Relative abundance of Prevotellaceae of 6.5% or less had 86.1% sensitivity and 38.9% specificity for PD. A logistic regression classifier based on the abundance of four bacterial families and the severity of constipation identified PD patients with 66.7% sensitivity and 90.3% specificity. The relative abundance of Enterobacteriaceae was positively associated with the severity of postural instability and gait difficulty. These findings suggest that the intestinal microbiome is altered in PD and is related to motor phenotype. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the temporal and causal relationships between gut microbiota and PD and the suitability of the microbiome as a biomarker. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.


#31 Genetic fine mapping and genomic annotation defines causal mechanisms at type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci Link logo

Gaulton, K.J.; Ferreira, T.; Lee, Y.; Raimondo, A.; Mägi, R.; Reschen, M.E.; Mahajan, A.; Locke, A.; William Rayner, N.; Robertson, N.; Scott, R.A.; Prokopenko, I.; Scott, L.J.; Green, T.; Sparso, T.; Thuillier, D.; Yengo, L.; Grallert, H.; Wahl, S.; Frånberg, M.

Nature Genetics Volume 47, Issue 12, Pages 1415–1425

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We performed fine mapping of 39 established type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci in 27,206 cases and 57,574 controls of European ancestry. We identified 49 distinct association signals at these loci, including five mapping in or near KCNQ1. 'Credible sets' of the variants most likely to drive each distinct signal mapped predominantly to noncoding sequence, implying that association with T2D is mediated through gene regulation. Credible set variants were enriched for overlap with FOXA2 chromatin immunoprecipitation binding sites in human islet and liver cells, including at MTNR1B, where fine mapping implicated rs10830963 as driving T2D association. We confirmed that the T2D risk allele for this SNP increases FOXA2-bound enhancer activity in islet- and liver-derived cells. We observed allele-specific differences in NEUROD1 binding in islet-derived cells, consistent with evidence that the T2D risk allele increases islet MTNR1B expression. Our study demonstrates how integration of genetic and genomic information can define molecular mechanisms through which variants underlying association signals exert their effects on disease.


#32 CTCF/cohesin-binding sites are frequently mutated in cancer Link logo

Katainen Riku, Dave Kashyap, Pitkänen Esa, Palin Kimmo, Kivioja Teemu, Välimäki Niko, Gylfe Alexandra E, Ristolainen Heikki, Hänninen Ulrika A, Cajuso Tatiana, Kondelin Johanna, Tanskanen Tomas, Mecklin Jukka-Pekka, Järvinen Heikki, Renkonen-Sinisalo Laura, Lepistö Anna, Kaasinen Eevi, Kilpivaara Outi, Tuupanen Sari, Enge Martin, Taipale Jussi, Aaltonen Lauri A

Nature Genetics Volume 47, Issue 7, Pages 818–821

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Cohesin is present in almost all active enhancer regions, where it is associated with transcription factors. Cohesin frequently colocalizes with CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor), affecting genomic stability, expression and epigenetic homeostasis. Cohesin subunits are mutated in cancer, but CTCF/cohesin-binding sites (CBSs) in DNA have not been examined for mutations. Here we report frequent mutations at CBSs in cancers displaying a mutational signature where mutations in A•T base pairs predominate. Integration of whole-genome sequencing data from 213 colorectal cancer (CRC) samples and chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-exo) data identified frequent point mutations at CBSs. In contrast, CRCs showing an ultramutator phenotype caused by defects in the exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase ɛ (POLE) displayed significantly fewer mutations at and adjacent to CBSs. Analysis of public data showed that multiple cancer types accumulate CBS mutations. CBSs are a major mutational hotspot in the noncoding cancer genome.


#33 Consensus Paper: The role of the cerebellum in perceptual processes PDF logo

Baumann O; Borra RJ; Bower JM; Cullen KE; Habas C; Ivry RB; Leggio M; Mattingley JB; Molinari M; Moulton EA; Paulin MG; Pavlova MA; Schmahmann JD; Sokolov AA

Cerebellum Volume 14, Issue 2, Pages 197–220

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Various lines of evidence accumulated over the past 30 years indicate that the cerebellum, long recognized as essential for motor control, also has considerable influence on perceptual processes. In this paper, we bring together experts from psychology and neuroscience, with the aim of providing a succinct but comprehensive overview of key findings related to the involvement of the cerebellum in sensory perception. The contributions cover such topics as anatomical and functional connectivity, evolutionary and comparative perspectives, visual and auditory processing, biological motion perception, nociception, self-motion, timing, predictive processing, and perceptual sequencing. While no single explanation has yet emerged concerning the role of the cerebellum in perceptual processes, this consensus paper summarizes the impressive empirical evidence on this problem and highlights diversities as well as commonalities between existing hypotheses. In addition to work with healthy individuals and patients with cerebellar disorders, it is also apparent that several neurological conditions in which perceptual disturbances occur, including autism and schizophrenia, are associated with cerebellar pathology. A better understanding of the involvement of the cerebellum in perceptual processes will thus likely be important for identifying and treating perceptual deficits that may at present go unnoticed and untreated. This paper provides a useful framework for further debate and empirical investigations into the influence of the cerebellum on sensory perception.


#34 2014 ESC/EACTS guidelines on myocardial revascularization PDF logo

Windecker S; Kohl P; Alfonso F; Collet JP; Cremer J; Falk V; Filippatos G; Hamm C; Head SJ; Jüni P; Kappetein AP; Kastrati A; Knuuti J; et al.

European Heart Journal Volume 35, Issue 37

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#35 Loss-of-function variants in ABCA7 confer risk of Alzheimer's disease Link logo

Steinberg Stacy, Stefansson Hreinn, Jonsson Thorlakur, Johannsdottir Hrefna, Ingason Andres, Helgason Hannes, Sulem Patrick, Magnusson Olafur Th, Gudjonsson Sigurjon A, Unnsteinsdottir Unnur, Kong Augustine, Helisalmi Seppo, Soininen Hilkka, Lah James J, DemGene, Aarsland Dag, Fladby Tormod, Ulstein Ingun D, Djurovic Srdjan, Sando Sigrid B (incl. Hiltunen Mikko)

Nature Genetics

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We conducted a search for rare, functional variants altering susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease that exploited knowledge of common variants associated with the same disease. We found that loss-of-function variants in ABCA7 confer risk of Alzheimer's disease in Icelanders (odds ratio (OR) = 2.12, P = 2.2 × 10(-13)) and discovered that the association replicated in study groups from Europe and the United States (combined OR = 2.03, P = 6.8 × 10(-15)).


#36 The Molecular Taxonomy of Primary Prostate Cancer Link logo PDF logo

Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network

Cell Volume 163, Issue 4, Pages 1011–1025

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There is substantial heterogeneity among primary prostate cancers, evident in the spectrum of molecular abnormalities and its variable clinical course. As part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we present a comprehensive molecular analysis of 333 primary prostate carcinomas. Our results revealed a molecular taxonomy in which 74% of these tumors fell into one of seven subtypes defined by specific gene fusions (ERG, ETV1/4, and FLI1) or mutations (SPOP, FOXA1, and IDH1). Epigenetic profiles showed substantial heterogeneity, including an IDH1 mutant subset with a methylator phenotype. Androgen receptor (AR) activity varied widely and in a subtype-specific manner, with SPOP and FOXA1 mutant tumors having the highest levels of AR-induced transcripts. 25% of the prostate cancers had a presumed actionable lesion in the PI3K or MAPK signaling pathways, and DNA repair genes were inactivated in 19%. Our analysis reveals molecular heterogeneity among primary prostate cancers, as well as potentially actionable molecular defects.


#37 EAU Guidelines on the Assessment of Non-neurogenic Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms including Benign Prostatic Obstruction Link logo PDF logo

Gratzke, Christian; Bachmann, Alexander; Descazeaud, Aurelien; Drake, Marcus J.; Madersbacher, Stephan; Mamoulakis, Charalampos; Oelke, Matthias; Tikkinen, Kari A. O.; Gravas, Stavros

European Urology

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Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) represent one of the most common clinical complaints in adult men and have multifactorial aetiology.


#38 Fat, fibre and cancer risk in African Americans and rural Africans Open access logo Link logo

O'Keefe, Stephen J. D.; Li, Jia V.; Lahti, Leo; Ou, Junhai; Carbonero, Franck; Mohammed, Khaled; Posma, Joram M.; Kinross, James; Wahl, Elaine; Ruder, Elizabeth; Vipperla, Kishore; Naidoo, Vasudevan; Mtshali, Lungile; Tims, Sebastian; Puylaert, Philippe G

Nature Communications

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Rates of colon cancer are much higher in African Americans (65:100,000) than in rural South Africans (<5:100,000). The higher rates are associated with higher animal protein and fat, and lower fibre consumption, higher colonic secondary bile acids, lower colonic short-chain fatty acid quantities and higher mucosal proliferative biomarkers of cancer risk in otherwise healthy middle-aged volunteers. Here we investigate further the role of fat and fibre in this association. We performed 2-week food exchanges in subjects from the same populations, where African Americans were fed a high-fibre, low-fat African-style diet and rural Africans a high-fat, low-fibre western-style diet, under close supervision. In comparison with their usual diets, the food changes resulted in remarkable reciprocal changes in mucosal biomarkers of cancer risk and in aspects of the microbiota and metabolome known to affect cancer risk, best illustrated by increased saccharolytic fermentation and butyrogenesis, and suppressed secondary bile acid synthesis in the African Americans.


#39 A summary of the new GINA strategy:a roadmap to asthma control Link logo PDF logo

Reddel, Helen K.; Bateman, Eric D.; Becker, Allan; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Cruz, Alvaro A.; Drazen, Jeffrey M.; Haahtela, Tari; Hurd, Suzanne S.; Inoue, Hiromasa; de Jongste, Johan C.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Levy, Mark L.; O'Byrne, Paul M.; Paggiaro, Pierlu

European Respiratory Journal Volume 46, Issue 3, Pages 622–639

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Over the past 20 years, the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) has regularly published and annually updated a global strategy for asthma management and prevention that has formed the basis for many national guidelines. However, uptake of existing guidelines is poor. A major revision of the GINA report was published in 2014, and updated in 2015, reflecting an evolving understanding of heterogeneous airways disease, a broader evidence base, increasing interest in targeted treatment, and evidence about effective implementation approaches. During development of the report, the clinical utility of recommendations and strategies for their practical implementation were considered in parallel with the scientific evidence.This article provides a summary of key changes in the GINA report, and their rationale. The changes include a revised asthma definition; tools for assessing symptom control and risk factors for adverse outcomes; expanded indications for inhaled corticosteroid therapy; a framework for targeted treatment based on phenotype, modifiable risk factors, patient preference, and practical issues; optimisation of medication effectiveness by addressing inhaler technique and adherence; revised recommendations about written asthma action plans; diagnosis and initial treatment of the asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome; diagnosis in wheezing pre-school children; and updated strategies for adaptation and implementation of GINA recommendations.


#40 The Dynamics of the Human Infant Gut Microbiome in Development and in Progression toward Type 1 Diabetes Link logo PDF logo

Kostic, Aleksandar D.; Gevers, Dirk; Siljander, Heli; Vatanen, Tommi; Hyotylainen, Tuulia; Hamalainen, Anu-Maaria; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Poho, Paivi; Mattila, Ismo; Lahdesmaki, Harri; Franzosa, Eric A.; Vaarala, Outi; de Goffau, Marcus; Harmse

Cell Host & Microbe (Science Direct) Volume 17, Issue 2, Pages 260–273

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Colonization of the fetal and infant gut microbiome results in dynamic changes in diversity, which can impact disease susceptibility. To examine the relationship between human gut microbiome dynamics throughout infancy and type 1 diabetes (T1D), we examined a cohort of 33 infants genetically predisposed to T1D. Modeling trajectories of microbial abundances through infancy revealed a subset of microbial relationships shared across most subjects. Although strain composition of a given species was highly variable between individuals, it was stable within individuals throughout infancy. Metabolic composition and metabolic pathway abundance remained constant across time. A marked drop in alpha-diversity was observed in T1D progressors in the time window between seroconversion and T1D diagnosis, accompanied by spikes in inflammation-favoring organisms, gene functions, and serum and stool metabolites. This work identifies trends in the development of the human infant gut microbiome along with specific alterations that precede T1D onset and distinguish T1D progressors from nonprogressors.


#41 Ezetimibe Added to Statin Therapy after Acute Coronary Syndromes Link logo

Cannon, Christopher P.; Blazing, Michael A.; Giugliano, Robert P.; McCagg, Amy; White, Jennifer A.; Theroux, Pierre; Darius, Harald; Lewis, Basil S.; Ophuis, Ton Oude; Jukema, J. Wouter; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Ruzyllo, Witold; De Lucca, Paul; Im, KyungAh; Bohula, Erin A.; Reist, Craig; Wiviott, Stephen D.; Tershakovec, Andrew M.; Musliner, Thomas A.; Braunwald, Eugene

New England Journal of Medicine Volume 372, Issue 25, Pages 2387–2397

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Background Statin therapy reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels and the risk of cardiovascular events, but whether the addition of ezetimibe, a nonstatin drug that reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption, can reduce the rate of cardiovascular events further is not known. Methods We conducted a double-blind, randomized trial involving 18,144 patients who had been hospitalized for an acute coronary syndrome within the preceding 10 days and had LDL cholesterol levels of 50 to 100 mg per deciliter (1.3 to 2.6 mmol per liter) if they were receiving lipid-lowering therapy or 50 to 125 mg per deciliter (1.3 to 3.2 mmol per liter) if they were not receiving lipid-lowering therapy. The combination of simvastatin (40 mg) and ezetimibe (10 mg) (simvastatin-ezetimibe) was compared with simvastatin (40 mg) and placebo (simvastatin monotherapy). The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina requiring rehospitalization, coronary revascularization (≥30 days after randomization), or nonfatal stroke. The median follow-up was 6 years. Results The median time-weighted average LDL cholesterol level during the study was 53.7 mg per deciliter (1.4 mmol per liter) in the simvastatin-ezetimibe group, as compared with 69.5 mg per deciliter (1.8 mmol per liter) in the simvastatin-monotherapy group (P<0.001). The Kaplan-Meier event rate for the primary end point at 7 years was 32.7% in the simvastatin-ezetimibe group, as compared with 34.7% in the simvastatin-monotherapy group (absolute risk difference, 2.0 percentage points; hazard ratio, 0.936; 95% confidence interval, 0.89 to 0.99; P=0.016). Rates of prespecified muscle, gallbladder, and hepatic adverse effects and cancer were similar in the two groups. Conclusions When added to statin therapy, ezetimibe resulted in incremental lowering of LDL cholesterol levels and improved cardiovascular outcomes. Moreover, lowering LDL cholesterol to levels below previous targets provided additional benefit. (Funded by Merck; IMPROVE-IT ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00202878 .).


#42 Antibiotic Therapy vs Appendectomy for Treatment of Uncomplicated Acute Appendicitis: The APPAC Randomized Clinical Trial Link logo PDF logo

Salminen P; Paajanen H; Rautio T; Nordström P; Aarnio M; Rantanen T; Tuominen R; Hurme S; Virtanen J; Mecklin JP; Sand J; Jartti A; Rinta-Kiikka I; Grönroos JM

JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association Volume 313, Issue 23

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An increasing amount of evidence supports the use of antibiotics instead of surgery for treating patients with uncomplicated acute appendicitis. To compare antibiotic therapy with appendectomy in the treatment of uncomplicated acute appendicitis confirmed by computed tomography (CT). The Appendicitis Acuta (APPAC) multicenter, open-label, noninferiority randomized clinical trial was conducted from November 2009 until June 2012 in Finland. The trial enrolled 530 patients aged 18 to 60 years with uncomplicated acute appendicitis confirmed by a CT scan. Patients were randomly assigned to early appendectomy or antibiotic treatment with a 1-year follow-up period. Patients randomized to antibiotic therapy received intravenous ertapenem (1 g/d) for 3 days followed by 7 days of oral levofloxacin (500 mg once daily) and metronidazole (500 mg 3 times per day). Patients randomized to the surgical treatment group were assigned to undergo standard open appendectomy. The primary end point for the surgical intervention was the successful completion of an appendectomy. The primary end point for antibiotic-treated patients was discharge from the hospital without the need for surgery and no recurrent appendicitis during a 1-year follow-up period. There were 273 patients in the surgical group and 257 in the antibiotic group. Of 273 patients in the surgical group, all but 1 underwent successful appendectomy, resulting in a success rate of 99.6% (95% CI, 98.0% to 100.0%). In the antibiotic group, 70 patients (27.3%; 95% CI, 22.0% to 33.2%) underwent appendectomy within 1 year of initial presentation for appendicitis. Of the 256 patients available for follow-up in the antibiotic group, 186 (72.7%; 95% CI, 66.8% to 78.0%) did not require surgery. The intention-to-treat analysis yielded a difference in treatment efficacy between groups of -27.0% (95% CI, -31.6% to ∞) (P = .89). Given the prespecified noninferiority margin of 24%, we were unable to demonstrate noninferiority of antibiotic treatment relative to surgery. Of the 70 patients randomized to antibiotic treatment who subsequently underwent appendectomy, 58 (82.9%; 95% CI, 72.0% to 90.8%) had uncomplicated appendicitis, 7 (10.0%; 95% CI, 4.1% to 19.5%) had complicated acute appendicitis, and 5 (7.1%; 95% CI, 2.4% to 15.9%) did not have appendicitis but received appendectomy for suspected recurrence. There were no intra-abdominal abscesses or other major complications associated with delayed appendectomy in patients randomized to antibiotic treatment. Among patients with CT-proven, uncomplicated appendicitis, antibiotic treatment did not meet the prespecified criterion for noninferiority compared with appendectomy. Most patients randomized to antibiotic treatment for uncomplicated appendicitis did not require appendectomy during the 1-year follow-up period, and those who required appendectomy did not experience significant complications. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01022567.


#43 Genome-wide association analysis of more than 120,000 individuals identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for breast cancer Link logo

Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Lindstrom, Sara; Canisius, Sander; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael J.; Maranian, Mel J.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J.; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Darabi, Hatef; Brand, Judith S.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Nielsen, Sune F.; Rahman, Nazneen

Nature Genetics Volume 47, Issue 4, Pages 373–380

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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining ∼14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprising 15,748 breast cancer cases and 18,084 controls together with 46,785 cases and 42,892 controls from 41 studies genotyped on a 211,155-marker custom array (iCOGS). Analyses were restricted to women of European ancestry. We generated genotypes for more than 11 million SNPs by imputation using the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel, and we identified 15 new loci associated with breast cancer at P < 5 × 10(-8). Combining association analysis with ChIP-seq chromatin binding data in mammary cell lines and ChIA-PET chromatin interaction data from ENCODE, we identified likely target genes in two regions: SETBP1 at 18q12.3 and RNF115 and PDZK1 at 1q21.1. One association appears to be driven by an amino acid substitution encoded in EXO1.


#44 Doha agreement meeting on terminology and definitions in groin pain in athletes PDF logo

Weir A; Brukner P; Delahunt E; ...; Paajanen H; ...; Hölmich P

British Journal of Sports Medicine Volume 49, Issue 12, Pages 768–774

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Heterogeneous taxonomy of groin injuries in athletes adds confusion to this complicated area. The 'Doha agreement meeting on terminology and definitions in groin pain in athletes' was convened to attempt to resolve this problem. Our aim was to agree on a standard terminology, along with accompanying definitions. A one-day agreement meeting was held on 4 November 2014. Twenty-four international experts from 14 different countries participated. Systematic reviews were performed to give an up-to-date synthesis of the current evidence on major topics concerning groin pain in athletes. All members participated in a Delphi questionnaire prior to the meeting. Unanimous agreement was reached on the following terminology. The classification system has three major subheadings of groin pain in athletes: 1. Defined clinical entities for groin pain: Adductor-related, iliopsoas-related, inguinal-related and pubic-related groin pain. 2. Hip-related groin pain. 3. Other causes of groin pain in athletes. The definitions are included in this paper. The Doha agreement meeting on terminology and definitions in groin pain in athletes reached a consensus on a clinically based taxonomy using three major categories. These definitions and terminology are based on history and physical examination to categorise athletes, making it simple and suitable for both clinical practice and research.


#45 Rapid mass spectrometric conversion of tissue biopsy samples into permanent quantitative digital proteome maps

Guo TN, Kouvonen P, Koh CC, Gillet LC, Wolski WE, Rost HL, Rosenberger G, Collins BC, Blum LC, Gillessen S, Joerger M, Jochum W, Aebersold R

Nature Medicine

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Clinical specimens are each inherently unique, limited and nonrenewable. Small samples such as tissue biopsies are often completely consumed after a limited number of analyses. Here we present a method that enables fast and reproducible conversion of a small amount of tissue (approximating the quantity obtained by a biopsy) into a single, permanent digital file representing the mass spectrometry (MS)-measurable proteome of the sample. The method combines pressure cycling technology (PCT) and sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion spectra (SWATH)-MS. The resulting proteome maps can be analyzed, re-analyzed, compared and mined in silico to detect and quantify specific proteins across multiple samples. We used this method to process and convert 18 biopsy samples from nine patients with renal cell carcinoma into SWATH-MS fragment ion maps. From these proteome maps we detected and quantified more than 2,000 proteins with a high degree of reproducibility across all samples. The measured proteins clearly distinguished tumorous kidney tissues from healthy tissues and differentiated distinct histomorphological kidney cancer subtypes.


#46 Intestinal Microbiota And Diet in IBS:Causes, Consequences, or Epiphenomena? Link logo

Rajilic-Stojanovic, Mirjana; Jonkers, Daisy M.; Salonen, Anne ; Hanevik, Kurt; Raes, Jeroen; Jalanka, Jonna; de Vos, Willem M.; Manichanh, Chaysavanh; Golic, Natasa; Enck, Paul; Philippou, Elena; Iraqi, Fuad A.; Clarke, Gerard; Spiller, Robin C.; Penders,

American Journal of Gastroenterology Volume 110, Issue 2

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Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a heterogeneous functional disorder with a multifactorial etiology that involves the interplay of both host and environmental factors. Among environmental factors relevant for IBS etiology, the diet stands out given that the majority of IBS patients report their symptoms to be triggered by meals or specific foods. The diet provides substrates for microbial fermentation, and, as the composition of the intestinal microbiota is disturbed in IBS patients, the link between diet, microbiota composition, and microbial fermentation products might have an essential role in IBS etiology. In this review, we summarize current evidence regarding the impact of diet and the intestinal microbiota on IBS symptoms, as well as the reported interactions between diet and the microbiota composition. On the basis of the existing data, we suggest pathways (mechanisms) by which diet components, via the microbial fermentation, could trigger IBS symptoms. Finally, this review provides recommendations for future studies that would enable elucidation of the role of diet and microbiota and how these factors may be (inter)related in the pathophysiology of IBS.


#47 ESPEN guidelines on nutrition in dementia PDF logo

Volkert, Dorothee; Chourdakis, Michael; Faxen-Irving, Gerd; Fruhwald, Thomas; Landi, Francesco; Suominen, Merja H.; Vandewoude, Maurits; Wirth, Rainer; Schneider, Stephane M.

Clinical Nutrition Volume 34, Issue 6

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Older people suffering from dementia are at increased risk of malnutrition due to various nutritional problems, and the question arises which interventions are effective in maintaining adequate nutritional intake and nutritional status in the course of the disease. It is of further interest whether supplementation of energy and/or specific nutrients is able to prevent further cognitive decline or even correct cognitive impairment, and in which situations artificial nutritional support is justified. It is the purpose of these guidelines to cover these issues with evidence-based recommendations. The guidelines were developed by an international multidisciplinary working group in accordance with officially accepted standards. The GRADE system was used for assigning strength of evidence. Recommendations were discussed, submitted to Delphi rounds and accepted in an online survey among ESPEN members. 26 recommendations for nutritional care of older persons with dementia are given. In every person with dementia, screening for malnutrition and close monitoring of body weight are recommended. In all stages of the disease, oral nutrition may be supported by provision of adequate, attractive food in a pleasant environment, by adequate nursing support and elimination of potential causes of malnutrition. Supplementation of single nutrients is not recommended unless there is a sign of deficiency. Oral nutritional supplements are recommended to improve nutritional status but not to correct cognitive impairment or prevent cognitive decline. Artificial nutrition is suggested in patients with mild or moderate dementia for a limited period of time to overcome a crisis situation with markedly insufficient oral intake, if low nutritional intake is predominantly caused by a potentially reversible condition, but not in patients with severe dementia or in the terminal phase of life. Nutritional care and support should be an integral part of dementia management. In all stages of the disease, the decision for or against nutritional interventions should be made on an individual basis after carefully balancing expected benefit and potential burden, taking the (assumed) patient will and general prognosis into account.


#48 Prevalence of Cerebral Amyloid Pathology in Persons Without Dementia A Meta-analysis Link logo PDF logo

Jansen WJ, Ossenkoppele R, Knol DL, Tijms BM, Scheltens P, Verhey FR, Visser PJ;Amyloid Biomarker Study Group, Aalten P, Aarsland D, Alcolea D, Alexander M, Almdahl IS, Arnold SE, Baldeiras I, Barthel H, van Berckel BN, Bibeau K, Blennow K, Brooks DJ, van Buchem MA, Camus V, Cavedo E, Chen K, Chetelat G, Cohen AD, Drzezga A, Engelborghs S, Fagan AM, Fladby T, Fleisher AS, van der Flier WM, Ford L, Förster S, Fortea J, Foskett N, Frederiksen KS, Freund-Levi Y, Frisoni GB, Froelich L, Gabryelewicz T, Gill KD, Gkatzima O, Gómez-Tortosa E, Gordon MF, Grimmer T, Herukka SK, Soininen H...

JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association Volume 313, Issue 19

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Cerebral amyloid-β aggregation is an early pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD), starting decades before dementia onset. Estimates of the prevalence of amyloid pathology in persons without dementia are needed to understand the development of AD and to design prevention studies. To use individual participant data meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of amyloid pathology as measured with biomarkers in participants with normal cognition, subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Relevant biomarker studies identified by searching studies published before April 2015 using the MEDLINE and Web of Science databases and through personal communication with investigators. Studies were included if they provided individual participant data for participants without dementia and used an a priori defined cutoff for amyloid positivity. Individual records were provided for 2914 participants with normal cognition, 697 with SCI, and 3972 with MCI aged 18 to 100 years from 55 studies. Prevalence of amyloid pathology on positron emission tomography or in cerebrospinal fluid according to AD risk factors (age, apolipoprotein E [APOE] genotype, sex, and education) estimated by generalized estimating equations. The prevalence of amyloid pathology increased from age 50 to 90 years from 10% (95% CI, 8%-13%) to 44% (95% CI, 37%-51%) among participants with normal cognition; from 12% (95% CI, 8%-18%) to 43% (95% CI, 32%-55%) among patients with SCI; and from 27% (95% CI, 23%-32%) to 71% (95% CI, 66%-76%) among patients with MCI. APOE-ε4 carriers had 2 to 3 times higher prevalence estimates than noncarriers. The age at which 15% of the participants with normal cognition were amyloid positive was approximately 40 years for APOE ε4ε4 carriers, 50 years for ε2ε4 carriers, 55 years for ε3ε4 carriers, 65 years for ε3ε3 carriers, and 95 years for ε2ε3 carriers. Amyloid positivity was more common in highly educated participants but not associated with sex or biomarker modality. Among persons without dementia, the prevalence of cerebral amyloid pathology as determined by positron emission tomography or cerebrospinal fluid findings was associated with age, APOE genotype, and presence of cognitive impairment. These findings suggest a 20- to 30-year interval between first development of amyloid positivity and onset of dementia.


#49 Prevalence of amyloid PET positivity in dementia syndromes: a meta-analysis. PDF logo

Ossenkoppele R, Jansen WJ, Rabinovici GD, Knol DL, van der Flier WM, van Berckel BN, Scheltens P, Visser PJ ; and the Amyloid PET Study Group

JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association Volume 313, Issue 19

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Amyloid-β positron emission tomography (PET) imaging allows in vivo detection of fibrillar plaques, a core neuropathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Its diagnostic utility is still unclear because amyloid plaques also occur in patients with non-AD dementia. To use individual participant data meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of amyloid positivity on PET in a wide variety of dementia syndromes. The MEDLINE and Web of Science databases were searched from January 2004 to April 2015 for amyloid PET studies. Case reports and studies on neurological or psychiatric diseases other than dementia were excluded. Corresponding authors of eligible cohorts were invited to provide individual participant data. Data were provided for 1359 participants with clinically diagnosed AD and 538 participants with non-AD dementia. The reference groups were 1849 healthy control participants (based on amyloid PET) and an independent sample of 1369 AD participants (based on autopsy). Estimated prevalence of positive amyloid PET scans according to diagnosis, age, and apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 status, using the generalized estimating equations method. The likelihood of amyloid positivity was associated with age and APOE ε4 status. In AD dementia, the prevalence of amyloid positivity decreased from age 50 to 90 years in APOE ε4 noncarriers (86% [95% CI, 73%-94%] at 50 years to 68% [95% CI, 57%-77%] at 90 years; n = 377) and to a lesser degree in APOE ε4 carriers (97% [95% CI, 92%-99%] at 50 years to 90% [95% CI, 83%-94%] at 90 years; n = 593; P < .01). Similar associations of age and APOE ε4 with amyloid positivity were observed in participants with AD dementia at autopsy. In most non-AD dementias, amyloid positivity increased with both age (from 60 to 80 years) and APOE ε4 carriership (dementia with Lewy bodies: carriers [n = 16], 63% [95% CI, 48%-80%] at 60 years to 83% [95% CI, 67%-92%] at 80 years; noncarriers [n = 18], 29% [95% CI, 15%-50%] at 60 years to 54% [95% CI, 30%-77%] at 80 years; frontotemporal dementia: carriers [n = 48], 19% [95% CI, 12%-28%] at 60 years to 43% [95% CI, 35%-50%] at 80 years; noncarriers [n = 160], 5% [95% CI, 3%-8%] at 60 years to 14% [95% CI, 11%-18%] at 80 years; vascular dementia: carriers [n = 30], 25% [95% CI, 9%-52%] at 60 years to 64% [95% CI, 49%-77%] at 80 years; noncarriers [n = 77], 7% [95% CI, 3%-18%] at 60 years to 29% [95% CI, 17%-43%] at 80 years. Among participants with dementia, the prevalence of amyloid positivity was associated with clinical diagnosis, age, and APOE genotype. These findings indicate the potential clinical utility of amyloid imaging for differential diagnosis in early-onset dementia and to support the clinical diagnosis of participants with AD dementia and noncarrier APOE ε4 status who are older than 70 years.


#50 Towards tuberculosis elimination:an action framework for low-incidence countries Link logo PDF logo

Loennroth, Knut; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Abubakar, Ibrahim; D'Ambrosio, Lia; de Vries, Gerard; Diel, Roland; Douglas, Paul; Falzon, Dennis; Gaudreau, Marc-Andre; Goletti, Delia; Ochoa, Edilberto R. Gonzalez; LoBue, Philip; Matteelli, Alberto; Njoo, H

European Respiratory Journal Volume 45, Issue 4

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This paper describes an action framework for countries with low tuberculosis (TB) incidence (<100 TB cases per million population) that are striving for TB elimination. The framework sets out priority interventions required for these countries to progress first towards "pre-elimination" (<10 cases per million) and eventually the elimination of TB as a public health problem (less than one case per million). TB epidemiology in most low-incidence countries is characterised by a low rate of transmission in the general population, occasional outbreaks, a majority of TB cases generated from progression of latent TB infection (LTBI) rather than local transmission, concentration to certain vulnerable and hard-to-reach risk groups, and challenges posed by cross-border migration. Common health system challenges are that political commitment, funding, clinical expertise and general awareness of TB diminishes as TB incidence falls. The framework presents a tailored response to these challenges, grouped into eight priority action areas: 1) ensure political commitment, funding and stewardship for planning and essential services; 2) address the most vulnerable and hard-to-reach groups; 3) address special needs of migrants and cross-border issues; 4) undertake screening for active TB and LTBI in TB contacts and selected high-risk groups, and provide appropriate treatment; 5) optimise the prevention and care of drug-resistant TB; 6) ensure continued surveillance, programme monitoring and evaluation and case-based data management; 7) invest in research and new tools; and 8) support global TB prevention, care and control. The overall approach needs to be multisectorial, focusing on equitable access to high-quality diagnosis and care, and on addressing the social determinants of TB. Because of increasing globalisation and population mobility, the response needs to have both national and global dimensions.


#51 A comprehensive 1000 Genomes-based genome-wide association meta-analysis of coronary artery disease Link logo

Nikpay, Majid; Goel, Anuj; Won, Hong-Hee; Hall, Leanne M.; Willenborg, Christina; Kanoni, Stavroula; Saleheen, Danish; Kyriakou, Theodosios; Nelson, Christopher P.; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Webb, Thomas R.; Zeng, Lingyao; Dehghan, Abbas; Alver, Maris; Armasu,

Nature Genetics Volume 47, Issue 10, Pages 1121–1130

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Existing knowledge of genetic variants affecting risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) is largely based on genome-wide association study (GWAS) analysis of common SNPs. Leveraging phased haplotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project, we report a GWAS meta-analysis of ∼185,000 CAD cases and controls, interrogating 6.7 million common (minor allele frequency (MAF) > 0.05) and 2.7 million low-frequency (0.005 < MAF < 0.05) variants. In addition to confirming most known CAD-associated loci, we identified ten new loci (eight additive and two recessive) that contain candidate casual genes newly implicating biological processes in vessel walls. We observed intralocus allelic heterogeneity but little evidence of low-frequency variants with larger effects and no evidence of synthetic association. Our analysis provides a comprehensive survey of the fine genetic architecture of CAD, showing that genetic susceptibility to this common disease is largely determined by common SNPs of small effect size.


#52 Findings From a Randomized Controlled Trial of Fecal Transplantation for Patients With Ulcerative Colitis Link logo PDF logo

Rossen, Noortje G.; Fuentes, Susana; van der Spek, Mirjam J.; Tijssen, Jan G.; Hartman, Jorn H. A.; Duflou, Ann; Lowenberg, Mark; van den Brink, Gijs R.; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M. H.; de Vos, Willem M.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; D'Haens, Geert R.; Ponsioen,

Gastroenterology

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& Aims: Several case series have reported the effects of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for ulcerative colitis (UC). We assessed the efficacy and safety of FMT for patients with UC in a double-blind randomized trial. Patients with mild to moderately active UC (n=50) were assigned to groups that underwent FMT with feces from healthy donors or were given autologous fecal microbiota (control); each was administered via naso-duodenal tube at the start of the study and 3 weeks later. The study was performed at the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam from June 2011 through May 2014. The composite primary endpoint was clinical remission (simple clinical colitis activity index scores ≤2) combined with ≥1 point decrease in the Mayo endoscopic score at week 12. Secondary endpoints were safety and microbiota composition by phylogenetic microarray in fecal samples. Thirty-seven patients completed the primary endpoint assessment. In the intention-to-treat analysis, 7/23 patients who received fecal transplants from healthy donors (30.4%) and 5/25 controls (20.0%) achieved the primary endpoint (P=.51). In the per protocol analysis, 7/17 patients who received fecal transplants from healthy donors (41.2%) and 5/20 controls (25.0%) achieved the primary endpoint (P=.29). Serious adverse events occurred in 4 patients (2 in the FMT group) but these were not considered to be related to the FMT. At 12 weeks the microbiota of responders in the FMT group was similar to that of their healthy donors; remission was associated with proportions of Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa. In this phase 2 trial, there was no statistically significant difference in clinical and endoscopic remission between patients with UC who received fecal transplants from healthy donors and those who received their own fecal microbiota, which may be due to limited numbers. However, the microbiota of responders had distinct features from that of nonresponders, warranting further study. ClinicalTrials.gov no: NCT01650038.


#53 Aromatase inhibitors versus tamoxifen in early breast cancer: patient-level meta-analysis of the randomised trials Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group (EBCTCG); Dowsett M; Forbes JF; Bradley R; Ingle J; Aihara T; Bliss J; Boccardo F; Coates A; Coombes RC; Cuzick J; Dubsky P; Gnant M; Kaufmann M; Kilburn L; Perrone F; Rea D; Thürlimann B; van de Velde C; Pan H; Peto R; Davies C; Gray R

The Lancet Volume 386, Issue 10001, Pages 1341–1352

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The optimal ways of using aromatase inhibitors or tamoxifen as endocrine treatment for early breast cancer remains uncertain. We undertook meta-analyses of individual data on 31 920 postmenopausal women with oestrogen-receptor-positive early breast cancer in the randomised trials of 5 years of aromatase inhibitor versus 5 years of tamoxifen; of 5 years of aromatase inhibitor versus 2-3 years of tamoxifen then aromatase inhibitor to year 5; and of 2-3 years of tamoxifen then aromatase inhibitor to year 5 versus 5 years of tamoxifen. Primary outcomes were any recurrence of breast cancer, breast cancer mortality, death without recurrence, and all-cause mortality. Intention-to-treat log-rank analyses, stratified by age, nodal status, and trial, yielded aromatase inhibitor versus tamoxifen first-event rate ratios (RRs). In the comparison of 5 years of aromatase inhibitor versus 5 years of tamoxifen, recurrence RRs favoured aromatase inhibitors significantly during years 0-1 (RR 0·64, 95% CI 0·52-0·78) and 2-4 (RR 0·80, 0·68-0·93), and non-significantly thereafter. 10-year breast cancer mortality was lower with aromatase inhibitors than tamoxifen (12·1% vs 14·2%; RR 0·85, 0·75-0·96; 2p=0·009). In the comparison of 5 years of aromatase inhibitor versus 2-3 years of tamoxifen then aromatase inhibitor to year 5, recurrence RRs favoured aromatase inhibitors significantly during years 0-1 (RR 0·74, 0·62-0·89) but not while both groups received aromatase inhibitors during years 2-4, or thereafter; overall in these trials, there were fewer recurrences with 5 years of aromatase inhibitors than with tamoxifen then aromatase inhibitors (RR 0·90, 0·81-0·99; 2p=0·045), though the breast cancer mortality reduction was not significant (RR 0·89, 0·78-1·03; 2p=0·11). In the comparison of 2-3 years of tamoxifen then aromatase inhibitor to year 5 versus 5 years of tamoxifen, recurrence RRs favoured aromatase inhibitors significantly during years 2-4 (RR 0·56, 0·46-0·67) but not subsequently, and 10-year breast cancer mortality was lower with switching to aromatase inhibitors than with remaining on tamoxifen (8·7% vs 10·1%; 2p=0·015). Aggregating all three types of comparison, recurrence RRs favoured aromatase inhibitors during periods when treatments differed (RR 0·70, 0·64-0·77), but not significantly thereafter (RR 0·93, 0·86-1·01; 2p=0·08). Breast cancer mortality was reduced both while treatments differed (RR 0·79, 0·67-0·92), and subsequently (RR 0·89, 0·81-0·99), and for all periods combined (RR 0·86, 0·80-0·94; 2p=0·0005). All-cause mortality was also reduced (RR 0·88, 0·82-0·94; 2p=0·0003). RRs differed little by age, body-mass index, stage, grade, progesterone receptor status, or HER2 status. There were fewer endometrial cancers with aromatase inhibitors than tamoxifen (10-year incidence 0·4% vs 1·2%; RR 0·33, 0·21-0·51) but more bone fractures (5-year risk 8·2% vs 5·5%; RR 1·42, 1·28-1·57); non-breast-cancer mortality was similar. Aromatase inhibitors reduce recurrence rates by about 30% (proportionately) compared with tamoxifen while treatments differ, but not thereafter. 5 years of an aromatase inhibitor reduces 10-year breast cancer mortality rates by about 15% compared with 5 years of tamoxifen, hence by about 40% (proportionately) compared with no endocrine treatment. Cancer Research UK, Medical Research Council.


#54 Polypharmacy in the aging patient : management of hypertension in octogenarians Link logo PDF logo

Benetos, A; Rossignol, P; Cherubini, A; Joly, L; Grodzicki, T; Rajkumar, C; Strandberg Timo E; Petrovic, M

JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association Volume 314, Issue 2

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Hypertension treatment is beneficial for most hypertensive patients. The benefits for patients who are very old and frail, especially those taking numerous medications, are less certain. To provide recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of hypertension among patients aged 80 years and older. MEDLINE, PubMed Central, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched from inception through April 2015, with an emphasis on 2010-2015. Manual cross-referencing of review articles and meta-analyses was also performed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining antihypertensive use in octogenarians. The search strategy included the following Medical Subject Headings: hypertension or high blood pressure and trials and oldest old or very old or very elderly. Six post hoc analyses of the previously published Hypertension in the Very Elderly Trial (HYVET) met the inclusion criteria. In the only placebo-controlled RCT on hypertension management in patients older than 80 years (HYVET; N = 3845), the treatment was associated with lower total mortality and key cardiovascular end points but the effect on stroke (fatal and nonfatal), which was the primary outcome, failed to reach the significance level (P = .06). Post hoc analyses of HYVET suggested that active hypertension treatment in very elderly patients was beneficial by reducing blood pressure in individuals with white coat hypertension, showed moderate benefits of the active treatment for cognition, a possible effect for fractures prevention, and sustained differences in reductions of total mortality and cardiovascular mortality in those receiving active treatment. However, patients were community dwelling and less disabled than individuals of the same age in general. Hypertensive patients who are healthy, functionally independent, and aged 80 years and older should be treated according to current recommendations for people older than 65 years. There is insufficient evidence regarding the benefits of hypertension treatment for frail polymedicated octogenarians, for whom treatment should be individualized.


#55 Fine mapping of type 1 diabetes susceptibility loci and evidence for colocalization of causal variants with lymphoid gene enhancers Link logo

Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Chen, Wei-Min; Burren, Oliver; Cooper, Nick J.; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Farber, Emily; Bonnie, Jessica K.; Szpak, Michal; Schofield, Ellen; Achuthan, Premanand; Guo, Hui; Fortune, Mary D.; Stevens, Helen; Walker, N

Nature Genetics Volume 47, Issue 4, Pages 381–386

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Genetic studies of type 1 diabetes (T1D) have identified 50 susceptibility regions, finding major pathways contributing to risk, with some loci shared across immune disorders. To make genetic comparisons across autoimmune disorders as informative as possible, a dense genotyping array, the Immunochip, was developed, from which we identified four new T1D-associated regions (P < 5 × 10(-8)). A comparative analysis with 15 immune diseases showed that T1D is more similar genetically to other autoantibody-positive diseases, significantly most similar to juvenile idiopathic arthritis and significantly least similar to ulcerative colitis, and provided support for three additional new T1D risk loci. Using a Bayesian approach, we defined credible sets for the T1D-associated SNPs. The associated SNPs localized to enhancer sequences active in thymus, T and B cells, and CD34(+) stem cells. Enhancer-promoter interactions can now be analyzed in these cell types to identify which particular genes and regulatory sequences are causal.


#56 Fluid challenges in intensive care:the FENICE study A global inception cohort study Link logo PDF logo

Cecconi, Maurizio; Hofer, Christoph; Teboul, Jean-Louis; Pettila, Ville; Wilkman, Erika; Molnar, Zsolt; Della Rocca, Giorgio; Aldecoa, Cesar; Artigas, Antonio; Jog, Sameer; Sander, Michael; Spies, Claudia; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; De Backer, Daniel; , ; ,

Intensive Care Medicine Volume 41, Issue 9, Pages 1529–1537

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Fluid challenges (FCs) are one of the most commonly used therapies in critically ill patients and represent the cornerstone of hemodynamic management in intensive care units. There are clear benefits and harms from fluid therapy. Limited data on the indication, type, amount and rate of an FC in critically ill patients exist in the literature. The primary aim was to evaluate how physicians conduct FCs in terms of type, volume, and rate of given fluid; the secondary aim was to evaluate variables used to trigger an FC and to compare the proportion of patients receiving further fluid administration based on the response to the FC. This was an observational study conducted in ICUs around the world. Each participating unit entered a maximum of 20 patients with one FC. 2213 patients were enrolled and analyzed in the study. The median [interquartile range] amount of fluid given during an FC was 500 ml (500-1000). The median time was 24 min (40-60 min), and the median rate of FC was 1000 [500-1333] ml/h. The main indication for FC was hypotension in 1211 (59 %, CI 57-61 %). In 43 % (CI 41-45 %) of the cases no hemodynamic variable was used. Static markers of preload were used in 785 of 2213 cases (36 %, CI 34-37 %). Dynamic indices of preload responsiveness were used in 483 of 2213 cases (22 %, CI 20-24 %). No safety variable for the FC was used in 72 % (CI 70-74 %) of the cases. There was no statistically significant difference in the proportion of patients who received further fluids after the FC between those with a positive, with an uncertain or with a negatively judged response. The current practice and evaluation of FC in critically ill patients are highly variable. Prediction of fluid responsiveness is not used routinely, safety limits are rarely used, and information from previous failed FCs is not always taken into account.


#57 EPA guidance on the early intervention in clinical high risk states of psychoses

Schmidt SJ, Schultze-Lutter F, Schimmelmann BG, Maric NP, Salokangas RKR, Riecher-Rossler A, van der Gaag M, Meneghelli A, Nordentoft M, Marshall M, Morrison A, Raballo A, Klosterkotter J, Ruhrmann S

European Psychiatry Volume 30, Issue 3, Pages 388–404

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#58 The Influence of Age and Sex on Genetic Associations with Adult Body Size and Shape: A Large-Scale Genome-Wide Interaction Study PDF logo

Winkler TW; Justice AE; Graff M; Barata L; Feitosa MF; Chu S; Czajkowski J; Esko T; Fall T; Kilpeläinen TO; Lu Y; Mägi R; Mihailov E; Pers TH; Rüeger S; Teumer A; Ehret GB; Ferreira T; Heard-Costa NL; Karjalainen J; Lagou V; Mahajan A; Neinast MD; Prokopenko I et al

PLoS Genetics Volume 11, Issue 10

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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic variants contributing to BMI, a measure of body size, or waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), a measure of body shape. Body size and shape change as people grow older and these changes differ substantially between men and women. To systematically screen for age- and/or sex-specific effects of genetic variants on BMI and WHRadjBMI, we performed meta-analyses of 114 studies (up to 320,485 individuals of European descent) with genome-wide chip and/or Metabochip data by the Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits (GIANT) Consortium. Each study tested the association of up to ~2.8M SNPs with BMI and WHRadjBMI in four strata (men ≤50y, men >50y, women ≤50y, women >50y) and summary statistics were combined in stratum-specific meta-analyses. We then screened for variants that showed age-specific effects (G x AGE), sex-specific effects (G x SEX) or age-specific effects that differed between men and women (G x AGE x SEX). For BMI, we identified 15 loci (11 previously established for main effects, four novel) that showed significant (FDR<5%) age-specific effects, of which 11 had larger effects in younger (<50y) than in older adults (≥50y). No sex-dependent effects were identified for BMI. For WHRadjBMI, we identified 44 loci (27 previously established for main effects, 17 novel) with sex-specific effects, of which 28 showed larger effects in women than in men, five showed larger effects in men than in women, and 11 showed opposite effects between sexes. No age-dependent effects were identified for WHRadjBMI. This is the first genome-wide interaction meta-analysis to report convincing evidence of age-dependent genetic effects on BMI. In addition, we confirm the sex-specificity of genetic effects on WHRadjBMI. These results may provide further insights into the biology that underlies weight change with age or the sexually dimorphism of body shape.


#59 Assessment of Recent Process Analytical Technology (PAT) Trends: A Multiauthor Review

Levente L. Simon; Hajnalka Pataki; György Marosi; Fabian Meemken; Konrad Hungerbühler; Alfons Baiker; Srinivas Tummala; Brian Glennon; Martin Kuentz; Gerry Steele; Herman J. M. Kramer; James W. Rydzak; Zengping Chen; Julian Morris; Francois Kjell; Ravendra Singh; Rafiqul Gani; Krist V. Gernaey; Marjatta Louhi-Kultanen; John O’Reilly

Organic Process Research & Development Volume 19, Issue 1, Pages 150108153518006–62

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#60 Assessing allele-specific expression across multiple tissues from RNA-seq read data Link logo PDF logo

Pirinen, Matti; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Zaitlen, Noah A.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Donnelly, Peter; McCarthy, Mark I.; Rivas, Manuel A.; ,

Bioinformatics Volume 31, Issue 15, Pages 2497–2504

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RNA sequencing enables allele-specific expression (ASE) studies that complement standard genotype expression studies for common variants and, importantly, also allow measuring the regulatory impact of rare variants. The Genotype-Tissue Expression project (GTEx) is collecting RNA-seq data on multiple tissues of a same set of individuals and novel methods are required for the analysis of these data. We present a statistical method to compare different patterns of ASE across tissues and to classify genetic variants according to their impact on the tissue-wide expression profile. We focus on strong ASE effects that we are expecting to see for protein-truncating variants, but our method can also be adjusted for other types of ASE effects. We illustrate the method with a real data example on a tissue-wide expression profile of a variant causal for lipoid proteinosis, and with a simulation study to assess our method more generally. http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/~rivas/mamba/ R-sources and data examples http://www.iki.fi/~mpirinen/ CONTACT: matti.pirinen@helsinki.fi rivas@well.ox.ac.uk.


#61 Familial hypercholesterolaemia in children and adolescents:gaining decades of life by optimizing detection and treatment Link logo PDF logo

Wiegman, Albert; Gidding, Samuel S.; Watts, Gerald F.; Chapman, M. John; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Cuchel, Marina; Ose, Leiv; Averna, Maurizio; Boileau, Catherine; Boren, Jan; Bruckert, Eric; Catapano, Alberico L.; Defesche, Joep C.; Descamps, Olivier S.; Hegel

European Heart Journal Volume 36, Issue 36, Pages 2425–2437

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Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is a common genetic cause of premature coronary heart disease (CHD). Globally, one baby is born with FH every minute. If diagnosed and treated early in childhood, individuals with FH can have normal life expectancy. This consensus paper aims to improve awareness of the need for early detection and management of FH children. Familial hypercholesterolaemia is diagnosed either on phenotypic criteria, i.e. an elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level plus a family history of elevated LDL-C, premature coronary artery disease and/or genetic diagnosis, or positive genetic testing. Childhood is the optimal period for discrimination between FH and non-FH using LDL-C screening. An LDL-C ≥5 mmol/L (190 mg/dL), or an LDL-C ≥4 mmol/L (160 mg/dL) with family history of premature CHD and/or high baseline cholesterol in one parent, make the phenotypic diagnosis. If a parent has a genetic defect, the LDL-C cut-off for the child is ≥3.5 mmol/L (130 mg/dL). We recommend cascade screening of families using a combined phenotypic and genotypic strategy. In children, testing is recommended from age 5 years, or earlier if homozygous FH is suspected. A healthy lifestyle and statin treatment (from age 8 to 10 years) are the cornerstones of management of heterozygous FH. Target LDL-C is <3.5 mmol/L (130 mg/dL) if >10 years, or ideally 50% reduction from baseline if 8-10 years, especially with very high LDL-C, elevated lipoprotein(a), a family history of premature CHD or other cardiovascular risk factors, balanced against the long-term risk of treatment side effects. Identifying FH early and optimally lowering LDL-C over the lifespan reduces cumulative LDL-C burden and offers health and socioeconomic benefits. To drive policy change for timely detection and management, we call for further studies in the young. Increased awareness, early identification, and optimal treatment from childhood are critical to adding decades of healthy life for children and adolescents with FH.


#62 Conditionally Stabilized dCas9 Activator for Controlling Gene Expression in Human Cell Reprogramming and Differentiation Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Balboa, Diego; Weltner, Jere; Eurola, Solja; Trokovic, Ras; Wartiovaara, Kirmo; Otonkoski, Timo

Stem Cell Reports Volume 5, Issue 3, Pages 448–459

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CRISPR/Cas9 protein fused to transactivation domains can be used to control gene expression in human cells. In this study, we demonstrate that a dCas9 fusion with repeats of VP16 activator domains can efficiently activate human genes involved in pluripotency in various cell types. This activator in combination with guide RNAs targeted to the OCT4 promoter can be used to completely replace transgenic OCT4 in human cell reprogramming. Furthermore, we generated a chemically controllable dCas9 activator version by fusion with the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) destabilization domain. Finally, we show that the destabilized dCas9 activator can be used to control human pluripotent stem cell differentiation into endodermal lineages.


#63 Lixisenatide in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndrome

Pfeffer MA, Claggett B, Diaz R, Dickstein K, Gerstein HC, Køber LV, Lawson FC, Ping L, Wei X, Lewis EF, Maggioni AP, McMurray JJ, Probstfield JL, Riddle MC, Solomon SD, Tardif JC; for the ELIXA Investigators

New England Journal of Medicine Volume 373, Issue 23, Pages 2247–2257

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Background Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are higher among patients with type 2 diabetes, particularly those with concomitant cardiovascular diseases, than in most other populations. We assessed the effects of lixisenatide, a glucagon-like peptide 1-receptor agonist, on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes who had had a recent acute coronary event. Methods We randomly assigned patients with type 2 diabetes who had had a myocardial infarction or who had been hospitalized for unstable angina within the previous 180 days to receive lixisenatide or placebo in addition to locally determined standards of care. The trial was designed with adequate statistical power to assess whether lixisenatide was noninferior as well as superior to placebo, as defined by an upper boundary of the 95% confidence interval for the hazard ratio of less than 1.3 and 1.0, respectively, for the primary composite end point of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, or hospitalization for unstable angina. Results The 6068 patients who underwent randomization were followed for a median of 25 months. A primary end-point event occurred in 406 patients (13.4%) in the lixisenatide group and in 399 (13.2%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89 to 1.17), which showed the noninferiority of lixisenatide to placebo (P<0.001) but did not show superiority (P=0.81). There were no significant between-group differences in the rate of hospitalization for heart failure (hazard ratio in the lixisenatide group, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.23) or the rate of death (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.78 to 1.13). Lixisenatide was not associated with a higher rate of serious adverse events or severe hypoglycemia, pancreatitis, pancreatic neoplasms, or allergic reactions than was placebo. Conclusions In patients with type 2 diabetes and a recent acute coronary syndrome, the addition of lixisenatide to usual care did not significantly alter the rate of major cardiovascular events or other serious adverse events. (Funded by Sanofi; ELIXA ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01147250 .).


#64 Diagnosis and management of osteonecrosis of the jaw : a systematic and international consensus Link logo PDF logo

Khan, Aliya A.; Morrison, Archie; Hanley, David H.; Felesenberg, Dieter; McCauley, Laurie K.; O´Ryan, Felice; Reid, Ian R.; Ruggiero, Salvatore L.; Taguchi, Akira; Tetradis, Sotiros; Watts, Nelson B.; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Peters, Edmund; Guise, Teresa; Eastell, Richard; Cheung, Angela M.; Morin, Suzanne N.; Masri, Basel; Cooper, Cyrus; Morgan, Sarah L.; Pietsch-Obermayer, Barbara; Langdahl, Bente L.; Al Dabagh, Rana; Davison, K. Shawn; Kendler, David L.; Sandor, George K.

Journal of Bone & Mineral Research Volume 30, Issue 1, Pages 3–23

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This paper provides a systematic review of the literature from January 2003 to April 2014 pertaining to the incidence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), and offers recommendations for its management based on multidisciplinary international consensus. ONJ is associated with oncology-dose parenteral anti-resorptive therapy of bisphosphonates (BP) and denosumab (Dmab). The incidence of ONJ is greatest in the oncology patient population (1-15%) where high doses of these medications are used at frequent intervals. In the osteoporosis patient population, the incidence of ONJ is estimated at 0.001% to 0.01%, marginally higher than the incidence in the general population (<0.001%). New insights into the pathophysiology of ONJ include anti-resorptive effects of BPs and Dmab, effects of BPs on gamma delta T-cells and on monocyte and macrophage function, as well as the role of local bacterial infection, inflammation and necrosis. Advances in imaging include the use of cone beam computerized tomography assessing cortical and cancellous architecture with lower radiation exposure, magnetic resonance imaging, bone scanning and positron emission tomography, although plain films often suffice. Other risk factors for ONJ include glucocorticoid use, maxillary or mandibular bone surgery, poor oral hygiene, chronic inflammation, diabetes mellitus, ill-fitting dentures, as well as other drugs, including anti-angiogenic agents. Prevention strategies for ONJ include elimination or stabilization of oral disease prior to initiation of anti-resorptive agents, as well as maintenance of good oral hygiene. In those patients at high risk for the development of ONJ, including cancer patients receiving high-dose BP or Dmab therapy, consideration should be given to withholding anti-resorptive therapy following extensive oral surgery until the surgical site heals with mature mucosal coverage. Management of ONJ is based on the stage of the disease, size of the lesions, as well as the presence of contributing drug therapy and comorbidity. Conservative therapy includes topical antibiotic oral rinses and systemic antibiotic therapy. Localized surgical debridement is indicated in advanced non-responsive disease and has been successful. Early data have suggested enhanced osseous wound healing with teriparatide in those without contraindications for its use. Experimental therapy includes bone marrow stem cell intralesional transplantation, low-level laser therapy, local platelet-derived growth factor application, hyperbaric oxygen, and tissue grafting. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.


#65 Maternal prenatal stress is associated with the infant intestinal microbiota Link logo

Zijlmans, Maartje A. C.; Korpela, Katri; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne; de Vos, Willem M.; de Weerth, Carolina

Psychoneuroendocrinology

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Maternal prenatal stress has been often associated with infant physical development and health, as well as psychological functioning and behavior. However, the mechanisms underlying these relations remain elusive. The goal of the present study was to prospectively investigate the development of the intestinal microbiota as a potential pathway linking maternal prenatal stress and infant health. The development of the infant intestinal microbiota was followed over the first 110 days after birth in a healthy cohort of 56 vaginally born Dutch infants. Additionally, the relation between infant intestinal microbiota and gastrointestinal and allergic symptoms was examined. Results showed that maternal prenatal stress, i.e., either reported stress or elevated basal maternal salivary cortisol concentrations or both, was strongly and persistently associated with the infants' microbiota composition as determined by a phylogenetic microarray. Infants of mothers with high cumulative stress (i.e., high reported stress and high cortisol concentrations) during pregnancy had significantly higher relative abundances of Proteobacterial groups known to contain pathogens (related to Escherichia, Serratia, and Enterobacter), and lower relative abundances of lactic acid bacteria (i.e., Lactobacillus, Lactoccus, Aerococcus) and Bifidobacteria, altogether characteristics of a potentially increased level of inflammation. Furthermore, this aberrant colonization pattern was related to more maternally reported infant gastrointestinal symptoms and allergic reactions. In conclusion, clear links were found between maternal prenatal stress and the infant intestinal microbiota and health. Although causality cannot be concluded, the results suggest a possible mechanism by which maternal prenatal stress influences the offspring development. These results suggest a potential for bacterial interventions to enhance offspring health and development in pregnant women with stress.


#66 Inulin-type fructans modulate intestinal Bifidobacterium species populations and decrease fecal short-chain fatty acids in obese women Link logo

Salazar, Nuria; Dewulf, Evelyne M.; Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Bindels, Laure B.; Cani, Patrice D.; Mahillon, Jacques; de Vos, Willem M.; Thissen, Jean-Paul; Gueimonde, Miguel; de Los Reyes-Gavilan, Clara G.; Delzenne, Nathalie M.

Clinical Nutrition

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Inulin-type fructans (ITF) prebiotics promote changes in the composition and activity of the gut microbiota. The aim of this study was to determine variations on fecal short chain fatty acids (SCFA) concentration in obese women treated with ITF and to explore associations between Bifidobacterium species, SCFA and host biological markers of metabolism.


#67 International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force on Suicide:meta-analyses and meta-regression of correlates of suicide attempts and suicide deaths in bipolar disorder Link logo PDF logo

Schaffer, Ayal; Isometsä, Erkki Tapio; Tondo, Leonardo; Moreno, Doris H.; Turecki, Gustavo; Reis, Catherine; Cassidy, Frederick; Sinyor, Mark; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Ha, Kyooseob; Goldstein, Tina; Weizman, Abraham; Beautrais, Annette; C

Bipolar Disorders Volume 17, Issue 1, Pages 1–16

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Bipolar disorder is associated with a high risk of suicide attempts and suicide death. The main objective of the present study was to identify and quantify the demographic and clinical correlates of attempted and completed suicide in people with bipolar disorder.


#68 Efficacy of an adjuvanted herpes zoster subunit vaccine in older adults Link logo

Lal Himal; Cunningham Anthony L; Godeaux Oliver; Chlibek Roman; Diez-Domingo Javier; Hwang Shinn-Jang; Levin Myron J; McElhaney Janet E; Poder Airi; Puig-Barberà Joan; Vesikari Timo; Watanabe Daisuke; Weckx Lily; Zahaf Toufik; Heineman Thomas C; for the ZOE-50 Study Group

New England Journal of Medicine Volume 372, Issue 22

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Background In previous phase 1-2 clinical trials involving older adults, a subunit vaccine containing varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein E and the AS01B adjuvant system (called HZ/su) had a clinically acceptable safety profile and elicited a robust immune response. Methods We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 study in 18 countries to evaluate the efficacy and safety of HZ/su in older adults (≥50 years of age), stratified according to age group (50 to 59, 60 to 69, and ≥70 years). Participants received two intramuscular doses of the vaccine or placebo 2 months apart. The primary objective was to assess the efficacy of the vaccine, as compared with placebo, in reducing the risk of herpes zoster in older adults. Results A total of 15,411 participants who could be evaluated received either the vaccine (7698 participants) or placebo (7713 participants). During a mean follow-up of 3.2 years, herpes zoster was confirmed in 6 participants in the vaccine group and in 210 participants in the placebo group (incidence rate, 0.3 vs. 9.1 per 1000 person-years) in the modified vaccinated cohort. Overall vaccine efficacy against herpes zoster was 97.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 93.7 to 99.0; P<0.001). Vaccine efficacy was between 96.6% and 97.9% for all age groups. Solicited reports of injection-site and systemic reactions within 7 days after vaccination were more frequent in the vaccine group. There were solicited or unsolicited reports of grade 3 symptoms in 17.0% of vaccine recipients and 3.2% of placebo recipients. The proportions of participants who had serious adverse events or potential immune-mediated diseases or who died were similar in the two groups. Conclusions The HZ/su vaccine significantly reduced the risk of herpes zoster in adults who were 50 years of age or older. Vaccine efficacy in adults who were 70 years of age or older was similar to that in the other two age groups. (Funded by GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals; ZOE-50 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01165177 .).


#69 Randomized trial of primary PCI with or without routine manual thrombectomy Link logo

Jolly SS; Cairns JA; Yusuf S; et al; Niemelä K

New England Journal of Medicine Volume 372, Issue 15, Pages 1389–1398

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Background During primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), manual thrombectomy may reduce distal embolization and thus improve microvascular perfusion. Small trials have suggested that thrombectomy improves surrogate and clinical outcomes, but a larger trial has reported conflicting results. Methods We randomly assigned 10,732 patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary PCI to a strategy of routine upfront manual thrombectomy versus PCI alone. The primary outcome was a composite of death from cardiovascular causes, recurrent myocardial infarction, cardiogenic shock, or New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV heart failure within 180 days. The key safety outcome was stroke within 30 days. Results The primary outcome occurred in 347 of 5033 patients (6.9%) in the thrombectomy group versus 351 of 5030 patients (7.0%) in the PCI-alone group (hazard ratio in the thrombectomy group, 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85 to 1.15; P=0.86). The rates of cardiovascular death (3.1% with thrombectomy vs. 3.5% with PCI alone; hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.73 to 1.12; P=0.34) and the primary outcome plus stent thrombosis or target-vessel revascularization (9.9% vs. 9.8%; hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.14; P=0.95) were also similar. Stroke within 30 days occurred in 33 patients (0.7%) in the thrombectomy group versus 16 patients (0.3%) in the PCI-alone group (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.13 to 3.75; P=0.02). Conclusions In patients with STEMI who were undergoing primary PCI, routine manual thrombectomy, as compared with PCI alone, did not reduce the risk of cardiovascular death, recurrent myocardial infarction, cardiogenic shock, or NYHA class IV heart failure within 180 days but was associated with an increased rate of stroke within 30 days. (Funded by Medtronic and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research; TOTAL ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01149044 .).


#70 Axitinib effectively inhibits BCR-ABL1(T315I) with a distinct binding conformation Link logo

Pemovska, Tea; Johnson, Eric; Kontro, Mika; Repasky, Gretchen A.; Chen, Jeffrey; Wells, Peter; Cronin, Ciaran N.; McTigue, Michele; Kallioniemi, Olli; Porkka, Kimmo; Murray, Brion W.; Wennerberg, Krister

Nature

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The BCR-ABL1 fusion gene is a driver oncogene in chronic myeloid leukaemia and 30-50% of cases of adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Introduction of ABL1 kinase inhibitors (for example, imatinib) has markedly improved patient survival, but acquired drug resistance remains a challenge. Point mutations in the ABL1 kinase domain weaken inhibitor binding and represent the most common clinical resistance mechanism. The BCR-ABL1 kinase domain gatekeeper mutation Thr315Ile (T315I) confers resistance to all approved ABL1 inhibitors except ponatinib, which has toxicity limitations. Here we combine comprehensive drug sensitivity and resistance profiling of patient cells ex vivo with structural analysis to establish the VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor axitinib as a selective and effective inhibitor for T315I-mutant BCR-ABL1-driven leukaemia. Axitinib potently inhibited BCR-ABL1(T315I), at both biochemical and cellular levels, by binding to the active form of ABL1(T315I) in a mutation-selective binding mode. These findings suggest that the T315I mutation shifts the conformational equilibrium of the kinase in favour of an active (DFG-in) A-loop conformation, which has more optimal binding interactions with axitinib. Treatment of a T315I chronic myeloid leukaemia patient with axitinib resulted in a rapid reduction of T315I-positive cells from bone marrow. Taken together, our findings demonstrate an unexpected opportunity to repurpose axitinib, an anti-angiogenic drug approved for renal cancer, as an inhibitor for ABL1 gatekeeper mutant drug-resistant leukaemia patients. This study shows that wild-type proteins do not always sample the conformations available to disease-relevant mutant proteins and that comprehensive drug testing of patient-derived cells can identify unpredictable, clinically significant drug-repositioning opportunities.


#71 European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2015 Section 2. Adult basic life support and automated external defibrillation PDF logo

Perkins, Gavin D.; Handley, Anthony J.; Koster, Rudolph W.; Castren, Maaret; Smyth, Michael A.; Olasveengen, Theresa; Monsieurs, Koenraad G.; Raffay, Violetta; Graesner, Jan-Thorsten; Wenzel, Volker; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Soar, Jasmeet; ,

Resuscitation Volume 81, Issue 10, Pages 1277–1292

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#72 SPOTLIGHT:PATIENT CENTRED CARE Decision aids that really promote shared decision making: the pace quickens Link logo PDF logo

Agoritsas, Thomas; Heen, Anja Fog; Brandt, Linn; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Kristiansen, Annette; Akl, Elie A.; Neumann, Ignacio; Tikkinen, Kari A. O.; van der Weijden, Trudy; Elwyn, Glyn; Montori, Victor M.; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Vandvik, Per Olav

British Medical Journal Volume 350, Issue feb10 14

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#73 Epidemiology of acute kidney injury in critically ill patients:the multinational AKI-EPI study Link logo PDF logo

Hoste, Eric A. J.; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Cely, Cynthia M.; Colman, Roos; Cruz, Dinna N.; Edipidis, Kyriakos; Forni, Lui G.; Gomersall, Charles D.; Govil, Deepak; Honore, Patrick M.; Joannes-Boyau, Olivier; Joannidis, Michael; Korhonen, Anna-

Intensive Care Medicine Volume 41, Issue 8, Pages 1411–1423

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Current reports on acute kidney injury (AKI) in the intensive care unit (ICU) show wide variation in occurrence rate and are limited by study biases such as use of incomplete AKI definition, selected cohorts, or retrospective design. Our aim was to prospectively investigate the occurrence and outcomes of AKI in ICU patients. The Acute Kidney Injury-Epidemiologic Prospective Investigation (AKI-EPI) study was an international cross-sectional study performed in 97 centers on patients during the first week of ICU admission. We measured AKI by Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria, and outcomes at hospital discharge. A total of 1032 ICU patients out of 1802 [57.3 %; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 55.0-59.6] had AKI. Increasing AKI severity was associated with hospital mortality when adjusted for other variables; odds ratio of stage 1 = 1.679 (95 % CI 0.890-3.169; p = 0.109), stage 2 = 2.945 (95 % CI 1.382-6.276; p = 0.005), and stage 3 = 6.884 (95 % CI 3.876-12.228; p < 0.001). Risk-adjusted rates of AKI and mortality were similar across the world. Patients developing AKI had worse kidney function at hospital discharge with estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in 47.7 % (95 % CI 43.6-51.7) versus 14.8 % (95 % CI 11.9-18.2) in those without AKI, p < 0.001. This is the first multinational cross-sectional study on the epidemiology of AKI in ICU patients using the complete KDIGO criteria. We found that AKI occurred in more than half of ICU patients. Increasing AKI severity was associated with increased mortality, and AKI patients had worse renal function at the time of hospital discharge. Adjusted risks for AKI and mortality were similar across different continents and regions.


#74 Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in trials for Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases

Lleó A; Cavedo E; Parnetti L; Vanderstichele H; Herukka SK; Andreasen N; Ghidoni R; Lewczuk P; Jeromin A; Winblad B; Tsolaki M; Mroczko B; Visser PJ; Santana I; Svenningsson P; Blennow K; Aarsland D; Molinuevo JL; Zetterberg H; Mollenhauer B

Nature Reviews Neurology

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Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD) are the most common neurodegenerative disorders. For both diseases, early intervention is thought to be essential to the success of disease-modifying treatments. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can reflect some of the pathophysiological changes that occur in the brain, and the number of CSF biomarkers under investigation in neurodegenerative conditions has grown rapidly in the past 20 years. In AD, CSF biomarkers are increasingly being used in clinical practice, and have been incorporated into the majority of clinical trials to demonstrate target engagement, to enrich or stratify patient groups, and to find evidence of disease modification. In PD, CSF biomarkers have not yet reached the clinic, but are being studied in patients with parkinsonism, and are being used in clinical trials either to monitor progression or to demonstrate target engagement and downstream effects of drugs. CSF biomarkers might also serve as surrogate markers of clinical benefit after a specific therapeutic intervention, although additional data are required. It is anticipated that CSF biomarkers will have an important role in trials aimed at disease modification in the near future. In this Review, we provide an overview of CSF biomarkers in AD and PD, and discuss their role in clinical trials.


#75 Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation

Kato N, Loh M, Takeuchi F, Verweij N, Wang X, Zhang WH, Kelly TN, Saleheen D, Lehne B, Leach IM, Drong AW, Abbott J, Wahl S, Tan ST, Scott WR, Campanella G, Chadeau-Hyam M, Afzal U, Ahluwalia TS, Bonder MJ, Chen P, Dehghan A, Edwards TL, Esko T, Go MJ, Harris SE, Hartiala J, Kasela S, Kasturiratne A, Khor CC, Kleber ME, Li HX, Mok ZY, Nakatochi M, Sapari NS, Saxena R, Stewart AFR, Stolk L, Tabara Y, Teh AL, Wu Y, Wu JY, Zhang Y, Aits I, Alves ADC, Das S, Dorajoo R, Hopewell JC, Kim YK, Koivula RW, Luan J, Lyytikainen LP, Nguyen QN, Pereira MA, Postmus I, Raitakari OT, Bryan MS, Scott RA, Sorice R, Tragante V, Traglia M, White J, Yamamoto K, Zhang YH, Adair LS, Ahmed A, Akiyama K, Asif R, Aung T, Barroso I, Bjonnes A, Braun TR, Cai H, Chang LC, Chen CH, Cheng CY, Chong YS, Collins R, Courtn

Nature Genetics Volume 47, Issue 11, Pages 1282–1293

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We carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 × 10(-11) to 5.0 × 10(-21)). The sentinel blood pressure SNPs are enriched for association with DNA methylation at multiple nearby CpG sites, suggesting that, at some of the loci identified, DNA methylation may lie on the regulatory pathway linking sequence variation to blood pressure. The sentinel SNPs at the 12 new loci point to genes involved in vascular smooth muscle (IGFBP3, KCNK3, PDE3A and PRDM6) and renal (ARHGAP24, OSR1, SLC22A7 and TBX2) function. The new and known genetic variants predict increased left ventricular mass, circulating levels of NT-proBNP, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality (P = 0.04 to 8.6 × 10(-6)). Our results provide new evidence for the role of DNA methylation in blood pressure regulation.


#76 Large-scale genomic analyses link reproductive aging to hypothalamic signaling, breast cancer susceptibility and BRCA1-mediated DNA repair Link logo

Day, Felix R.; Ruth, Katherine S.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Pervjakova, Natalia; Chasman, Daniel I.; Stolk, Lisette; Finucane, Hilary K.; Sulem, Patrick; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Esko, Tonu; Johnson, Andrew D.; Elks, Cathy E.; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Brody, Jennifer A.; Franke, Lude L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Keller, Margaux F.

Nature Genetics Volume 47, Issue 11, Pages 1294–1303

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Menopause timing has a substantial impact on infertility and risk of disease, including breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We report a dual strategy in ∼70,000 women to identify common and low-frequency protein-coding variation associated with age at natural menopause (ANM). We identified 44 regions with common variants, including two regions harboring additional rare missense alleles of large effect. We found enrichment of signals in or near genes involved in delayed puberty, highlighting the first molecular links between the onset and end of reproductive lifespan. Pathway analyses identified major association with DNA damage response (DDR) genes, including the first common coding variant in BRCA1 associated with any complex trait. Mendelian randomization analyses supported a causal effect of later ANM on breast cancer risk (∼6% increase in risk per year; P = 3 × 10(-14)), likely mediated by prolonged sex hormone exposure rather than DDR mechanisms.


#77 Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Criteria in Defining Severe Sepsis Link logo

Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija; Bailey, Michael; Pilcher, David; Cooper, D. Jamie; Bellomo, Rinaldo

New England Journal of Medicine Volume 372, Issue 17, Pages 1629–1638

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Background The consensus definition of severe sepsis requires suspected or proven infection, organ failure, and signs that meet two or more criteria for the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). We aimed to test the sensitivity, face validity, and construct validity of this approach. Methods We studied data from patients from 172 intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand from 2000 through 2013. We identified patients with infection and organ failure and categorized them according to whether they had signs meeting two or more SIRS criteria (SIRS-positive severe sepsis) or less than two SIRS criteria (SIRS-negative severe sepsis). We compared their characteristics and outcomes and assessed them for the presence of a step increase in the risk of death at a threshold of two SIRS criteria. Results Of 1,171,797 patients, a total of 109,663 had infection and organ failure. Among these, 96,385 patients (87.9%) had SIRS-positive severe sepsis and 13,278 (12.1%) had SIRS-negative severe sepsis. Over a period of 14 years, these groups had similar characteristics and changes in mortality (SIRS-positive group: from 36.1% [829 of 2296 patients] to 18.3% [2037 of 11,119], P<0.001; SIRS-negative group: from 27.7% [100 of 361] to 9.3% [122 of 1315], P<0.001). Moreover, this pattern remained similar after adjustment for baseline characteristics (odds ratio in the SIRS-positive group, 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.96 to 0.97; odds ratio in the SIRS-negative group, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94 to 0.98; P=0.12 for between-group difference). In the adjusted analysis, mortality increased linearly with each additional SIRS criterion (odds ratio for each additional criterion, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.15; P<0.001) without any transitional increase in risk at a threshold of two SIRS criteria. Conclusions The need for two or more SIRS criteria to define severe sepsis excluded one in eight otherwise similar patients with infection, organ failure, and substantial mortality and failed to define a transition point in the risk of death. (Funded by the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre.).


#78 MARK-AGE biomarkers of ageing Open access logo Link logo

Bürkle Alexander; Moreno-Villanueva María; Bernhard Jürgen; Blasco María; Zondag Gerben; Hoeijmakers Jan H J; Toussaint Olivier; Grubeck-Loebenstein Beatrix; Mocchegiani Eugenio; Collino Sebastiano; Gonos Efstathios S; Sikora Ewa; Gradinaru Daniela; Dollé Martijn; Salmon Michel; Kristensen Peter; Griffiths Helen R; Libert Claude; Grune Tilman; Breusing Nicolle; Simm Andreas; Franceschi Claudio

Mechanisms of Ageing & Development

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Many candidate biomarkers of human ageing have been proposed in the scientific literature but in all cases their variability in cross-sectional studies is considerable, and therefore no single measurement has proven to serve a useful marker to determine, on its own, biological age. A plausible reason for this is the intrinsic multi-causal and multi-system nature of the ageing process. The recently performed MARK-AGE study was a large-scale integrated project supported by the European Commission. The major aim of this project was to conduct a population study comprising about 3300 subjects in order to identify a set of biomarkers of ageing which, as a combination of parameters with appropriate weighting, would measure biological age better than any marker in isolation.


#79 A recurrent de novo mutation in KCNC1 causes progressive myoclonus epilepsy Link logo

Muona, Mikko; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Oliver, Karen L.; Maljevic, Snezana; Bayly, Marta A.; Joensuu, Tarja; Canafoglia, Laura; Franceschetti, Silvana; Michelucci, Roberto; Markkinen, Salla; Heron, Sarah E.; Hildebrand, Michael S.; Anderma

Nature Genetics Volume 47, Issue 1, Pages 39–46

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Progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) are a group of rare, inherited disorders manifesting with action myoclonus, tonic-clonic seizures and ataxia. We sequenced the exomes of 84 unrelated individuals with PME of unknown cause and molecularly solved 26 cases (31%). Remarkably, a recurrent de novo mutation, c.959G>A (p.Arg320His), in KCNC1 was identified as a new major cause for PME. Eleven unrelated exome-sequenced (13%) and two affected individuals in a secondary cohort (7%) had this mutation. KCNC1 encodes KV3.1, a subunit of the KV3 voltage-gated potassium ion channels, which are major determinants of high-frequency neuronal firing. Functional analysis of the Arg320His mutant channel showed a dominant-negative loss-of-function effect. Ten cases had pathogenic mutations in known PME-associated genes (NEU1, NHLRC1, AFG3L2, EPM2A, CLN6 and SERPINI1). Identification of mutations in PRNP, SACS and TBC1D24 expand their phenotypic spectra to PME. These findings provide insights into the molecular genetic basis of PME and show the role of de novo mutations in this disease entity.


#80 Modeling Linkage Disequilibrium Increases Accuracy of Polygenic Risk Scores Link logo PDF logo

Vilhjalmsson, Bjarni J.; Yang, Jian; Finucane, Hilary K.; Gusev, Alexander; Lindstrom, Sara; Ripke, Stephan; Genovese, Giulio; Loh, Po-Ru; Bhatia, Gaurav; Do, Ron; Hayeck, Tristan; Won, Hong-Hee; Kathiresan, Sekar; Pato, Michele; Pato, Carlos; Tamimi, Rulla; Stahl, Eli; Zaitlen, Noah; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Belbin, Gillian

American Journal of Human Genetics Volume 97, Issue 4, Pages 576–592

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Polygenic risk scores have shown great promise in predicting complex disease risk and will become more accurate as training sample sizes increase. The standard approach for calculating risk scores involves linkage disequilibrium (LD)-based marker pruning and applying a p value threshold to association statistics, but this discards information and can reduce predictive accuracy. We introduce LDpred, a method that infers the posterior mean effect size of each marker by using a prior on effect sizes and LD information from an external reference panel. Theory and simulations show that LDpred outperforms the approach of pruning followed by thresholding, particularly at large sample sizes. Accordingly, predicted R(2) increased from 20.1% to 25.3% in a large schizophrenia dataset and from 9.8% to 12.0% in a large multiple sclerosis dataset. A similar relative improvement in accuracy was observed for three additional large disease datasets and for non-European schizophrenia samples. The advantage of LDpred over existing methods will grow as sample sizes increase.


#81 Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes-Pitfalls and Possibilities Open access logo Link logo

Prasad, Rashmi B.; Groop, Leif

Genes Volume 6, Issue 1, Pages 87–123

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Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex disease that is caused by a complex interplay between genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. While the major environmental factors, diet and activity level, are well known, identification of the genetic factors has been a challenge. However, recent years have seen an explosion of genetic variants in risk and protection of T2D due to the technical development that has allowed genome-wide association studies and next-generation sequencing. Today, more than 120 variants have been convincingly replicated for association with T2D and many more with diabetes-related traits. Still, these variants only explain a small proportion of the total heritability of T2D. In this review, we address the possibilities to elucidate the genetic landscape of T2D as well as discuss pitfalls with current strategies to identify the elusive unknown heritability including the possibility that our definition of diabetes and its subgroups is imprecise and thereby makes the identification of genetic causes difficult.


#82 Target risk factors for dementia prevention : a systematic review and Delphi consensus study on the evidence from observational studies Link logo PDF logo

Deckers Kay, van Boxtel Martin PJ, Schiepers Olga JG, de Vugt Marjolein, Muñoz Sánchez Juan Luis, Anstey Kaarin J, Brayne Carol, Dartigues Jean-Francois, Engedal Knut, Kivipelto Miia, Ritchie Karen, Starr John M, Yaffe Kristine, Irving Kate, Verhey Frans RJ, Köhler Sebastian

International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry Volume 30, Issue 3, Pages 234–246

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Dementia has a multifactorial etiology, but the importance of individual health and lifestyle related risk factors is often uncertain or based on few studies. The goal of this paper is to identify the major modifiable risk factors for dementia as a first step in developing an effective preventive strategy and promoting healthy late life cognitive functioning.


#83 Cell Specific eQTL Analysis without Sorting Cells Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Westra, Harm-Jan; Arends, Danny; Esko, Tonu; Peters, Marjolein J.; Schurmann, Claudia; Schramm, Katharina; Kettunen, Johannes; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Li, Yang; Fu, Jingyuan; Karjalainen, Juha; Platteel, Mathieu;

PLoS Genetics Volume 11, Issue 5

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The functional consequences of trait associated SNPs are often investigated using expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping. While trait-associated variants may operate in a cell-type specific manner, eQTL datasets for such cell-types may not always be available. We performed a genome-environment interaction (GxE) meta-analysis on data from 5,683 samples to infer the cell type specificity of whole blood cis-eQTLs. We demonstrate that this method is able to predict neutrophil and lymphocyte specific cis-eQTLs and replicate these predictions in independent cell-type specific datasets. Finally, we show that SNPs associated with Crohn's disease preferentially affect gene expression within neutrophils, including the archetypal NOD2 locus.


#84 Correlates of Total Sedentary Time and Screen Time in 9-11 Year-Old Children around the World:The International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment Open access logo PDF logo

LeBlanc, Allana G.; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Barreira, Tiago V.; Broyles, Stephanie T.; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Church, Timothy S.; Fogelholm, Mikael; Harrington, Deirdre M.; Hu, Gang; Kuriyan, Rebecca; Kurpad, Anura; Lambert, Estelle V.; Maher, Carol; Maia,

PLoS ONE Volume 10, Issue 6

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Previously, studies examining correlates of sedentary behavior have been limited by small sample size, restricted geographic area, and little socio-cultural variability. Further, few studies have examined correlates of total sedentary time (SED) and screen time (ST) in the same population. This study aimed to investigate correlates of SED and ST in children around the world. The sample included 5,844 children (45.6% boys, mean age = 10.4 years) from study sites in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Finland, India, Kenya, Portugal, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Child- and parent-reported behavioral, household, and neighborhood characteristics and directly measured anthropometric and accelerometer data were obtained. Twenty-one potential correlates of SED and ST were examined using multilevel models, adjusting for sex, age, and highest parental education, with school and study site as random effects. Variables that were moderately associated with SED and/or ST in univariate analyses (p<0.10) were included in the final models. Variables that remained significant in the final models (p<0.05) were considered correlates of SED and/or ST. Children averaged 8.6 hours of daily SED, and 54.2% of children failed to meet ST guidelines. In all study sites, boys reported higher ST, were less likely to meet ST guidelines, and had higher BMI z-scores than girls. In 9 of 12 sites, girls engaged in significantly more SED than boys. Common correlates of higher SED and ST included poor weight status, not meeting physical activity guidelines, and having a TV or a computer in the bedroom. In this global sample many common correlates of SED and ST were identified, some of which are easily modifiable (e.g., removing TV from the bedroom), and others that may require more intense behavioral interventions (e.g., increasing physical activity). Future work should incorporate these findings into the development of culturally meaningful public health messages.


#85 Cumulative meta-analysis of interleukins 6 and 1 beta, tumour necrosis factor alpha and C-reactive protein in patients with major depressive disorder Link logo

Haapakoski, Rita; Mathieu, Julia; Ebmeier, Klaus P.; Alenius, Harri; Kivimaki, Mika

Brain, Behavior & Immunity

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Cumulative meta-analyses are used to evaluate the extent to which further studies are needed to confirm or refute a hypothesis. We used this approach to assess observational evidence on systemic inflammation in individuals with major depressive disorder. We identified 58 studies of four common inflammatory markers in a literature search of PubMed, Embase and PsychInfo databases in May 2014. Pooled data from the earliest eight studies already showed an association between interleukin-6 concentrations and major depression; 23 more recent studies confirmed this finding (d=0.54, p<0.0001). A significant association between C-reactive protein levels and major depression was noted after 14 studies and this did not change after addition of six more studies (d=0.47, p<0.0001). For these two inflammatory markers, there was moderate heterogeneity in study-specific estimates, subgroup differences were small, and publication bias appeared to be an unlikely explanation for the findings. Sensitivity analyses including only high-quality studies and subjects free of antidepressant medication further verified the associations. While there was a link between tumour necrosis factor-α levels and major depression (d=0.40, p=0.002), the cumulative effect remained uncertain due to the extensive heterogeneity in study-specific estimates and inconsistencies between subgroups. No evidence was found for the association between interleukin-1β levels and major depression (d=-0.05, p=0.86). In conclusion, this cumulative meta-analysis confirmed higher mean levels of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein in patients with major depression compared to non-depressed controls. No consistent association between tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and major depression was observed. Future studies should clarify the specific immune mechanisms involved as well as continue testing anti-inflammatory therapies in patients suffering from major depression.


#86 Effect of predicted protein-truncating genetic variants on the human transcriptome Link logo PDF logo

Rivas, Manuel A.; Pirinen, Matti; Conrad, Donald F.; Lek, Monkol; Tsang, Emily K.; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Maller, Julian B.; Kukurba, Kimberly R.; DeLuca, David S.; Fromer, Menachem; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Smith, Kevin S.; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Fengmei; Banks, E

Science Volume 348, Issue 6235, Pages 666–669

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Accurate prediction of the functional effect of genetic variation is critical for clinical genome interpretation. We systematically characterized the transcriptome effects of protein-truncating variants, a class of variants expected to have profound effects on gene function, using data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) and Geuvadis projects. We quantitated tissue-specific and positional effects on nonsense-mediated transcript decay and present an improved predictive model for this decay. We directly measured the effect of variants both proximal and distal to splice junctions. Furthermore, we found that robustness to heterozygous gene inactivation is not due to dosage compensation. Our results illustrate the value of transcriptome data in the functional interpretation of genetic variants.


#87 Management Guidelines for Penetrating Abdominal Trauma Link logo

Biffl, Walter L.; Leppaniemi, Ari

World Journal of Surgery

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The optimal management of patients with penetrating abdominal injuries has been debated for decades, since mandatory laparotomy (LAP) gave way to the concept of "selective conservatism."


#88 Papilloomavirustartunta ja HPV-testin toimivuus kohdunkaulan syövän seulonnassa PDF logo

Leinonen, Maarit K.; Anttila, Ahti; Nieminen, Pekka

Clinical Infectious Diseases Volume 60, Issue 6

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 More than 300 million travelers visit regions with poor hygiene annually. A significant percentage of them become colonized by resistant intestinal bacteria such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE) and may transmit the strains to others and to medical care settings when they return home. Despite the threats to global healthcare caused by an upsurge in antimicrobial resistance, no effort has been centered on prevention of colonization while traveling.


#89 Evolving insights in cell-matrix interactions - Elucidating how non-soluble properties of the extracellular niche direct stem cell fate Open access logo Link logo

Walters Nick J; Gentleman Eileen

Acta Biomaterialia

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The role of soluble messengers in directing cellular behaviours has been recognized for decades. However, many cellular processes, including adhesion, migration and stem cell differentiation, are also governed by chemical and physical interactions with non-soluble components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Among other effects, a cell's perception of nanoscale features such as substrate topography and ligand presentation, and its ability to deform the matrix via the generation of cytoskeletal tension play fundamental roles in these cellular processes. As a result, many biomaterials-based tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies aim to harness the cell's perception of substrate stiffness and nanoscale features to direct particular behaviours. However, since cell-ECM interactions vary considerably between two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) models, understanding their influence over normal and pathological cell responses in 3-D systems that better mimic the in vivo microenvironment is essential to translate such insights efficiently into medical therapies. This review summarizes the key findings in these areas and discusses how insights from 2-D biomaterials are being used to examine cellular behaviours in more complex 3-D hydrogel systems, in which not only matrix stiffness, but also degradability, plays an important role, and in which defining the nanoscale ligand presentation presents an additional challenge.


#90 Multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of 21,000 cases and 95,000 controls identifies new risk loci for atopic dermatitis Link logo

Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Waage, Johannes; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Strachan, David P.; Curtin, John A.; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Tian, Chao; Takahashi, Atsushi; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Couto Alves, Alexessander; Thyssen, Jacob P.; den Dekker, Herman T.; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Xiao, Feng Li; Gonzalez, Juan R.; Marenholz, Ingo

Nature Genetics Volume 47, Issue 12, Pages 1449–1456

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Genetic association studies have identified 21 loci associated with atopic dermatitis risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify further susceptibility loci for this common, complex skin disease, we performed a meta-analysis of >15 million genetic variants in 21,399 cases and 95,464 controls from populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry, followed by replication in 32,059 cases and 228,628 controls from 18 studies. We identified ten new risk loci, bringing the total number of known atopic dermatitis risk loci to 31 (with new secondary signals at four of these loci). Notably, the new loci include candidate genes with roles in the regulation of innate host defenses and T cell function, underscoring the important contribution of (auto)immune mechanisms to atopic dermatitis pathogenesis.


#91 Executive Summary to EDC-2: The Endocrine Society's Second Scientific Statement on Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals. PDF logo

Gore AC, Chappell VA, Fenton SE, Flaws JA, Nadal A, Prins GS, Toppari J, Zoeller RT

Endocrine Reviews Volume 36, Issue 6, Pages 593–602

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This Executive Summary to the Endocrine Society's second Scientific Statement on environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) provides a synthesis of the key points of the complete statement. The full Scientific Statement represents a comprehensive review of the literature on seven topics for which there is strong mechanistic, experimental, animal, and epidemiological evidence for endocrine disruption, namely: obesity and diabetes, female reproduction, male reproduction, hormone-sensitive cancers in females, prostate cancer, thyroid, and neurodevelopment and neuroendocrine systems. EDCs such as bisphenol A, phthalates, pesticides, persistent organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diethyl ethers, and dioxins were emphasized because these chemicals had the greatest depth and breadth of available information. The Statement also included thorough coverage of studies of developmental exposures to EDCs, especially in the fetus and infant, because these are critical life stages during which perturbations of hormones can increase the probability of a disease or dysfunction later in life. A conclusion of the Statement is that publications over the past 5 years have led to a much fuller understanding of the endocrine principles by which EDCs act, including nonmonotonic dose-responses, low-dose effects, and developmental vulnerability. These findings will prove useful to researchers, physicians, and other healthcare providers in translating the science of endocrine disruption to improved public health.


#92 Habitual sleep duration is associated with BMI and macronutrient intake and may be modified by CLOCK genetic variants Link logo PDF logo

Dashti, Hassan S.; Follis, Jack L.; Smith, Caren E.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Cade, Brian E.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Hruby, Adela; Jacques, Paul F.; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Richardson, Kris; Saxena, Richa; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.; Kovanen, Leena; Bartz, Traci M.; Pera

American Journal of Clinical Nutrition Volume 101, Issue 1

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Short sleep duration has been associated with greater risks of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Also, common genetic variants in the human Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (CLOCK) show associations with ghrelin and total energy intake.


#93 A coherent approach for analysis of the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip improves data quality and performance in epigenome-wide association studies Link logo PDF logo

Lehne B; Drong A W; Loh M; Zhang W; Scott W R; et al; Järvelin M-R; et al

Genome Biology (Online Edition) Volume 16, Issue 1

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DNA methylation plays a fundamental role in the regulation of the genome, but the optimal strategy for analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation data remains to be determined. We developed a comprehensive analysis pipeline for epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, based on 2,687 individuals, with 36 samples measured in duplicate. We propose new approaches to quality control, data normalisation and batch correction through control-probe adjustment and establish a null hypothesis for EWAS using permutation testing. Our analysis pipeline outperforms existing approaches, enabling accurate identification of methylation quantitative trait loci for hypothesis driven follow-up experiments.


#94 Maladaptive and adaptive emotion regulation through music: a behavioral and neuroimaging study of males and females Open access logo Link logo

Carlson, Emily;Saarikallio, Suvi;Toiviainen, Petri;Bogert, Brigitte;Kliuchko, Marina;Brattico, Elvira

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

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Music therapists use guided affect regulation in the treatment of mood disorders. However, self-directed uses of music in affect regulation are not fully understood. Some uses of music may have negative effects on mental health, as can non-music regulation strategies, such as rumination. Psychological testing and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were used explore music listening strategies in relation to mental health. Participants (n = 123) were assessed for depression, anxiety and Neuroticism, and uses of Music in Mood Regulation (MMR). Neural responses to music were measured in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in a subset of participants (n = 56). Discharge, using music to express negative emotions, related to increased anxiety and Neuroticism in all participants and particularly in males. Males high in Discharge showed decreased activity of mPFC during music listening compared with those using less Discharge. Females high in Diversion, using music to distract from negative emotions, showed more mPFC activity than females using less Diversion. These results suggest that the use of Discharge strategy can be associated with maladaptive patterns of emotional regulation, and may even have long-term negative effects on mental health. This finding has real-world applications in psychotherapy and particularly in clinical music therapy.


#95 A possible link between early probiotic intervention and the risk of neuropsychiatric disorders later in childhood: a randomized trial

Partty A, Kalliomaki M, Wacklin P, Salminen S, Isolauri E

Pediatric Research Volume 77, Issue 6, Pages 823–828

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Recent experimental evidence suggests that gut microbiota may alter function within the nervous system providing new insight on the mechanism of neuropsychiatric disorders.


#96 Genomic Predictors of Outcome in Prostate Cancer PDF logo

Boström PJ, Bjartell AS, Catto JW, Eggener SE, Lilja H, Loeb S, Schalken J, Schlomm T, Cooperberg MR

European Urology Volume 68, Issue 6, Pages 1033–1044

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Given the highly variable behavior and clinical course of prostate cancer (PCa) and the multiple available treatment options, a personalized approach to oncologic risk stratification is important. Novel genetic approaches offer additional information to improve clinical decision making. To review the use of genomic biomarkers in the prognostication of PCa outcome and prediction of therapeutic response. Systematic literature review focused on human clinical studies reporting outcome measures with external validation. The literature search included all Medline, Embase, and Scopus articles from inception through July 2014. An improved understanding of the genetic basis of prostate carcinogenesis has produced an increasing number of potential prognostic and predictive tools, such as transmembrane protease, serine2:v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (TMPRSS2:ERG) gene fusion status, loss of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene, and gene expression signatures utilizing messenger RNA from tumor tissue. Several commercially available gene panels with external validation are now available, although most have yet to be widely used. The most studied commercially available gene panels, Prolaris, Oncotype DX Genomic Prostate Score, and Decipher, may be used to estimate disease outcome in addition to clinical parameters or clinical nomograms. ConfirmMDx is an epigenetic test used to predict the results of repeat prostate biopsy after an initial negative biopsy. Additional future strategies include using genetic information from circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood to guide treatment decisions at the initial diagnosis and at subsequent decision points. Major advances have been made in our understanding of PCa biology in recent years. Our field is currently exploring the early stages of a personalized approach to augment traditional clinical decision making using commercially available genomic tools. A more comprehensive appreciation of value, limitations, and cost is important. We summarized current advances in genomic testing in prostate cancer with a special focus on the estimation of disease outcome. Several commercial tests are currently available, but further understanding is needed to appreciate the potential benefits and limitations of these novel tests.


#97 Antibiotic Exposure in Infancy and Risk of Being Overweight in the First 24 Months of Life Link logo PDF logo

Saari Antti, Virta Lauri J., Sankilampi Ulla, Dunkel Leo, Saxen Harri

Pediatrics Volume 135, Issue 4, Pages 617–626

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Antibiotics have direct effects on the human intestinal microbiota, particularly in infancy. Antibacterial agents promote growth in farm animals by unknown mechanisms, but little is known about their effects on human weight gain. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of antibiotic exposure during infancy on weight and height in healthy Finnish children. The population-based cohort comprised 6114 healthy boys and 5948 healthy girls having primary care weight and height measurements and drug purchase data from birth to 24 months. BMI and height, expressed as z-scores at the median age of 24 months (interquartile range 24 to 26 months), were compared between children exposed and unexposed to antibiotics using analysis of covariance with perinatal factors as covariates. Exposed children were on average heavier than unexposed children (adjusted BMI-for-age z-score difference in boys 0.13 SD [95% confidence interval 0.07 to 0.19, P < .001] and in girls 0.07 SD [0.01 to 0.13, P < .05]). The effect was most pronounced after exposure to macrolides before 6 months of age (boys 0.28 [0.11 to 0.46]; girls 0.23 [0.04 to 0.42]) or >1 exposure (boys 0.20 [0.10 to 0.30]; girls 0.13 [0.03 to 0.22]). Antibiotic exposure before 6 months of age, or repeatedly during infancy, was associated with increased body mass in healthy children. Such effects may play a role in the worldwide childhood obesity epidemic and highlight the importance of judicious use of antibiotics during infancy, favoring narrow-spectrum antibiotics.


#98 A novel Alzheimer disease locus located near the gene encoding tau protein Link logo

Jun G, Ibrahim-Verbaas CA, Vronskaya M, Lambert J-C, Chung J, Naj AC, Kunkle BW, Wang L-S, Bis JC, Bellenguez C, Harold D, Lunetta KL, Destefano AL, Grenier-Boley B, Sims R, Beecham GW, Smith AV, Chouraki V, Hamilton-Nelson KL, Ikram MA et al (incl. Hilkka Soininen;Mikko Hiltunen)

Molecular Psychiatry Volume 21, Issue 1, Pages 108–117

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APOE ɛ4, the most significant genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD), may mask effects of other loci. We re-analyzed genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP) Consortium in APOE ɛ4+ (10 352 cases and 9207 controls) and APOE ɛ4- (7184 cases and 26 968 controls) subgroups as well as in the total sample testing for interaction between a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and APOE ɛ4 status. Suggestive associations (P<1 × 10(-4)) in stage 1 were evaluated in an independent sample (stage 2) containing 4203 subjects (APOE ɛ4+: 1250 cases and 536 controls; APOE ɛ4-: 718 cases and 1699 controls). Among APOE ɛ4- subjects, novel genome-wide significant (GWS) association was observed with 17 SNPs (all between KANSL1 and LRRC37A on chromosome 17 near MAPT) in a meta-analysis of the stage 1 and stage 2 data sets (best SNP, rs2732703, P=5·8 × 10(-9)). Conditional analysis revealed that rs2732703 accounted for association signals in the entire 100-kilobase region that includes MAPT. Except for previously identified AD loci showing stronger association in APOE ɛ4+ subjects (CR1 and CLU) or APOE ɛ4- subjects (MS4A6A/MS4A4A/MS4A6E), no other SNPs were significantly associated with AD in a specific APOE genotype subgroup. In addition, the finding in the stage 1 sample that AD risk is significantly influenced by the interaction of APOE with rs1595014 in TMEM106B (P=1·6 × 10(-7)) is noteworthy, because TMEM106B variants have previously been associated with risk of frontotemporal dementia. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed that rs113986870, one of the GWS SNPs near rs2732703, is significantly associated with four KANSL1 probes that target transcription of the first translated exon and an untranslated exon in hippocampus (P⩽1.3 × 10(-8)), frontal cortex (P⩽1.3 × 10(-9)) and temporal cortex (P⩽1.2 × 10(-11)). Rs113986870 is also strongly associated with a MAPT probe that targets transcription of alternatively spliced exon 3 in frontal cortex (P=9.2 × 10(-6)) and temporal cortex (P=2.6 × 10(-6)). Our APOE-stratified GWAS is the first to show GWS association for AD with SNPs in the chromosome 17q21.31 region. Replication of this finding in independent samples is needed to verify that SNPs in this region have significantly stronger effects on AD risk in persons lacking APOE ɛ4 compared with persons carrying this allele, and if this is found to hold, further examination of this region and studies aimed at deciphering the mechanism(s) are warranted.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 17 March 2015; doi:10.1038/mp.2015.23.


#99 Low-frequency and rare exome chip variants associate with fasting glucose and type 2 diabetes susceptibility Open access logo Link logo

Wessel Jennifer, Chu Audrey Y, Willems Sara M, Wang Shuai, Yaghootkar Hanieh, Brody Jennifer A, Dauriz Marco, Hivert Marie-France, Raghavan Sridharan, Lipovich Leonard, Hidalgo Bertha, Fox Keolu, Huffman Jennifer E, An Ping, Lu Yingchang, Rasmussen-Torvik Laura J, Grarup Niels, Ehm Margaret G, Li Li, Baldridge Abigail S et al

Nature Communications

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Fasting glucose and insulin are intermediate traits for type 2 diabetes. Here we explore the role of coding variation on these traits by analysis of variants on the HumanExome BeadChip in 60,564 non-diabetic individuals and in 16,491 T2D cases and 81,877 controls. We identify a novel association of a low-frequency nonsynonymous SNV in GLP1R (A316T; rs10305492; MAF=1.4%) with lower FG (β=-0.09±0.01 mmol l(-1), P=3.4 × 10(-12)), T2D risk (OR[95%CI]=0.86[0.76-0.96], P=0.010), early insulin secretion (β=-0.07±0.035 pmolinsulin mmolglucose(-1), P=0.048), but higher 2-h glucose (β=0.16±0.05 mmol l(-1), P=4.3 × 10(-4)). We identify a gene-based association with FG at G6PC2 (pSKAT=6.8 × 10(-6)) driven by four rare protein-coding SNVs (H177Y, Y207S, R283X and S324P). We identify rs651007 (MAF=20%) in the first intron of ABO at the putative promoter of an antisense lncRNA, associating with higher FG (β=0.02±0.004 mmol l(-1), P=1.3 × 10(-8)). Our approach identifies novel coding variant associations and extends the allelic spectrum of variation underlying diabetes-related quantitative traits and T2D susceptibility.


#100 Antibodies to influenza nucleoprotein cross-react with human hypocretin receptor 2 PDF logo

Ahmed SS, Volkmuth W, Duca J, Corti L, Pallaoro M, Pezzicoli A, Karle A, Rigat F, Rappuoli R, Narasimhan V, Julkunen I, Vuorela A, Vaarala O, Nohynek H, Pasini FL, Montomoli E, Trombetta C, Adams CM, Rothbard J, Steinman L

Science Translational Medicine Volume 7, Issue 294, Pages 294ra105–294ra105

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The sleep disorder narcolepsy is linked to the HLA-DQB1*0602 haplotype and dysregulation of the hypocretin ligand-hypocretin receptor pathway. Narcolepsy was associated with Pandemrix vaccination (an adjuvanted, influenza pandemic vaccine) and also with infection by influenza virus during the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza pandemic. In contrast, very few cases were reported after Focetria vaccination (a differently manufactured adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccine). We hypothesized that differences between these vaccines (which are derived from inactivated influenza viral proteins) explain the association of narcolepsy with Pandemrix-vaccinated subjects. A mimic peptide was identified from a surface-exposed region of influenza nucleoprotein A that shared protein residues in common with a fragment of the first extracellular domain of hypocretin receptor 2. A significant proportion of sera from HLA-DQB1*0602 haplotype-positive narcoleptic Finnish patients with a history of Pandemrix vaccination (vaccine-associated narcolepsy) contained antibodies to hypocretin receptor 2 compared to sera from nonnarcoleptic individuals with either 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic influenza infection or history of Focetria vaccination. Antibodies from vaccine-associated narcolepsy sera cross-reacted with both influenza nucleoprotein and hypocretin receptor 2, which was demonstrated by competitive binding using 21-mer peptide (containing the identified nucleoprotein mimic) and 55-mer recombinant peptide (first extracellular domain of hypocretin receptor 2) on cell lines expressing human hypocretin receptor 2. Mass spectrometry indicated that relative to Pandemrix, Focetria contained 72.7% less influenza nucleoprotein. In accord, no durable antibody responses to nucleoprotein were detected in sera from Focetria-vaccinated nonnarcoleptic subjects. Thus, differences in vaccine nucleoprotein content and respective immune response may explain the narcolepsy association with Pandemrix.


#101 Effect of Finerenone on Albuminuria in Patients With Diabetic Nephropathy: A Randomized Clinical Trial PDF logo

George L. Bakris, Rajiv Agarwal, Juliana C. Chan, Mark E. Cooper, MD, Ron T. Gansevoort, Hermann Haller, Giuseppe Remuzzi, Peter Rossing, Roland E. Schmieder, Christina Nowack, Peter Kolkhof, Amer Joseph, Alexander Pieper, Nina Kimmeskamp-Kirschbaum, Luis M. Ruilope ; for the Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Tolerability Study–Diabetic Nephropathy (ARTS-DN) Study Group

JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association Volume 314, Issue 9

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Steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, when added to a renin-angiotensin system blocker, further reduce proteinuria in patients with chronic kidney disease but may be underused because of a high risk of adverse events. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of different oral doses of the nonsteroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist finerenone, given for 90 days to patients with diabetes and high or very high albuminuria who are receiving an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study conducted at 148 sites in 23 countries. Patients were recruited from June 2013 to February 2014 and the study was completed in August 2014. Of 1501 screened patients, 823 were randomized and 821 received study drug. Participants were randomly assigned to receive oral, once-daily finerenone (1.25 mg/d, n = 96; 2.5 mg/d, n = 92; 5 mg/d, n = 100; 7.5 mg/d, n = 97; 10 mg/d, n = 98; 15 mg/d, n = 125; and 25 mg/d, n = 119) or matching placebo (n = 94) for 90 days. The primary outcome was the ratio of the urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR) at day 90 vs at baseline. Safety end points were changes from baseline in serum potassium and estimated glomerular filtration rate. The mean age of the participants was 64.2 years; 78% were male. At baseline, 36.7% of patients treated had very high albuminuria (UACR ≥300 mg/g) and 40.0% had an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or lower. Finerenone demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in UACR. The primary outcome, the placebo-corrected mean ratio of the UACR at day 90 relative to baseline, was reduced in the finerenone 7.5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-mg/d groups (for 7.5 mg/d, 0.79 [90% CI, 0.68-0.91; P = .004]; for 10 mg/d, 0.76 [90% CI, 0.65-0.88; P = .001]; for 15 mg/d, 0.67 [90% CI, 0.58-0.77; P<.001]; for 20 mg/d, 0.62 [90% CI, 0.54-0.72; P < .001]). The prespecified secondary outcome of hyperkalemia leading to discontinuation was not observed in the placebo and finerenone 10-mg/d groups; incidences in the finerenone 7.5-, 15-, and 20-mg/d groups were 2.1%, 3.2%, and 1.7%, respectively. There were no differences in the incidence of the prespecified secondary outcome of an estimated glomerular filtration rate decrease of 30% or more or in incidences of adverse events and serious adverse events between the placebo and finerenone groups. Among patients with diabetic nephropathy, most receiving an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker, the addition of finerenone compared with placebo resulted in improvement in the urinary albumin-creatinine ratio. Further trials are needed to compare finerenone with other active medications. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT1874431.


#102 Epigenome-wide association of DNA methylation markers in peripheral blood from Indian Asians and Europeans with incident type 2 diabetes : a nested case-control study Link logo PDF logo

Chambers, John C.; Loh, Marie; Lehne, Benjamin; Drong, Alexander; Kriebel, Jennifer; Motta, Valeria; Wahl, Simone; Elliott, Hannah R.; Rota, Federica; Scott, William R.; Zhang, Weihua; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Campanella, Gianluca; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Yengo, Loic; Richmond, Rebecca C.; Adamowicz-Brice, Martyna; Afzal, Uzma; Bozaoglu, Kiymet; Mok, Zuan Yu

The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology Volume 3, Issue 7, Pages 526–534

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Indian Asians, who make up a quarter of the world's population, are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether DNA methylation is associated with future type 2 diabetes incidence in Indian Asians and whether differences in methylation patterns between Indian Asians and Europeans are associated with, and could be used to predict, differences in the magnitude of risk of developing type 2 diabetes. We did a nested case-control study of DNA methylation in Indian Asians and Europeans with incident type 2 diabetes who were identified from the 8-year follow-up of 25 372 participants in the London Life Sciences Prospective Population (LOLIPOP) study. Patients were recruited between May 1, 2002, and Sept 12, 2008. We did epigenome-wide association analysis using samples from Indian Asians with incident type 2 diabetes and age-matched and sex-matched Indian Asian controls, followed by replication testing of top-ranking signals in Europeans. For both discovery and replication, DNA methylation was measured in the baseline blood sample, which was collected before the onset of type 2 diabetes. Epigenome-wide significance was set at p<1 × 10(-7). We compared methylation levels between Indian Asian and European controls without type 2 diabetes at baseline to estimate the potential contribution of DNA methylation to increased risk of future type 2 diabetes incidence among Indian Asians. 1608 (11·9%) of 13 535 Indian Asians and 306 (4·3%) of 7066 Europeans developed type 2 diabetes over a mean of 8·5 years (SD 1·8) of follow-up. The age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence of type 2 diabetes was 3·1 times (95% CI 2·8-3·6; p<0·0001) higher among Indian Asians than among Europeans, and remained 2·5 times (2·1-2·9; p<0·0001) higher after adjustment for adiposity, physical activity, family history of type 2 diabetes, and baseline glycaemic measures. The mean absolute difference in methylation level between type 2 diabetes cases and controls ranged from 0·5% (SD 0·1) to 1·1% (0·2). Methylation markers at five loci were associated with future type 2 diabetes incidence; the relative risk per 1% increase in methylation was 1·09 (95% CI 1·07-1·11; p=1·3 × 10(-17)) for ABCG1, 0·94 (0·92-0·95; p=4·2 × 10(-11)) for PHOSPHO1, 0·94 (0·92-0·96; p=1·4 × 10(-9)) for SOCS3, 1·07 (1·04-1·09; p=2·1 × 10(-10)) for SREBF1, and 0·92 (0·90-0·94; p=1·2 × 10(-17)) for TXNIP. A methylation score combining results for the five loci was associated with future type 2 diabetes incidence (relative risk quartile 4 vs quartile 1 3·51, 95% CI 2·79-4·42; p=1·3 × 10(-26)), and was independent of established risk factors. Methylation score was higher among Indian Asians than Europeans (p=1 × 10(-34)). DNA methylation might provide new insights into the pathways underlying type 2 diabetes and offer new opportunities for risk stratification and prevention of type 2 diabetes among Indian Asians. The European Union, the UK National Institute for Health Research, the Wellcome Trust, the UK Medical Research Council, Action on Hearing Loss, the UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, the Oak Foundation, the Economic and Social Research Council, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, the German Research Center for Environmental Health, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, the German Center for Diabetes Research, the Munich Center for Health Sciences, the Ministry of Science and Research of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia, and the German Federal Ministry of Health.


#103 Healthy obesity and objective physical activity PDF logo

Bell, J.A.;Hamer, M.;van Hees, V.T.;Singh-Manoux, A.;Kivimäki M;Sabia, S.

American Journal of Clinical Nutrition Volume 102, Issue 2, Pages 268–275

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Disease risk is lower in metabolically healthy obese adults than in their unhealthy obese counterparts. Studies considering physical activity as a modifiable determinant of healthy obesity have relied on self-reported measures, which are prone to inaccuracies and do not capture all movements that contribute to health. We aimed to examine differences in total and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity between healthy and unhealthy obese groups by using both self-report and wrist-worn accelerometer assessments. Cross-sectional analyses were based on 3457 adults aged 60-82 y (77% male) participating in the British Whitehall II cohort study in 2012-2013. Normal-weight, overweight, and obese adults were considered "healthy" if they had <2 of the following risk factors: low HDL cholesterol, hypertension, high blood glucose, high triacylglycerol, and insulin resistance. Differences across groups in total physical activity, based on questionnaire and wrist-worn triaxial accelerometer assessments (GENEActiv), were examined by using linear regression. The likelihood of meeting 2010 World Health Organization recommendations for moderate-to-vigorous activity (≥2.5 h/wk) was compared by using prevalence ratios. Of 3457 adults, 616 were obese [body mass index (in kg/m(2)) ≥30]; 161 (26%) of those were healthy obese. Obese adults were less physically active than were normal-weight adults, regardless of metabolic health status or method of physical activity assessment. Healthy obese adults had higher total physical activity than did unhealthy obese adults only when assessed by accelerometer (P = 0.002). Healthy obese adults were less likely to meet recommendations for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity than were healthy normal-weight adults based on accelerometer assessment (prevalence ratio: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.43, 0.79) but were not more likely to meet these recommendations than were unhealthy obese adults (prevalence ratio: 1.26; 95% CI: 0.89, 1.80). Higher total physical activity in healthy than in unhealthy obese adults is evident only when measured objectively, which suggests that physical activity has a greater role in promoting health among obese populations than previously thought.


#104 Prevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage Link logo PDF logo

Vos Stephanie JB, Verhey Frans, Frölich Lutz, Kornhuber Johannes, Wiltfang Jens, Maier Wolfgang, Peters Oliver, Rüther Eckart, Nobili Flavio, Morbelli Silvia, Frisoni Giovanni B, Drzezga Alexander, Didic Mira, van Berckel Bart NM, Simmons Andrew, Soininen Hilkka, Kloszewska Iwona, Mecocci Patrizia, Tsolaki Magda, Vellas Bruno, Lovestone Simon, Muscio Cristina, Herukka Sanna-Kaisa, Salmon Eric, Bastin Christine, Wallin Anders, Nordlund Arto, de Mendonça Alexandre, Silva Dina, Santana Isabel, Lemos Raquel, Engelborghs Sebastiaan, Van der Mussele Stefan, Freund-Levi Yvonne et al

Brain: A Journal of Neurology Volume 138, Issue 5, Pages 1327–1338

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Three sets of research criteria are available for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in subjects with mild cognitive impairment: the International Working Group-1, International Working Group-2, and National Institute of Aging-Alzheimer Association criteria. We compared the prevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage according to these criteria. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (n = 1607), 766 of whom had both amyloid and neuronal injury markers, were recruited from 13 cohorts. We used cognitive test performance and available biomarkers to classify subjects as prodromal Alzheimer's disease according to International Working Group-1 and International Working Group-2 criteria and in the high Alzheimer's disease likelihood group, conflicting biomarker groups (isolated amyloid pathology or suspected non-Alzheimer pathophysiology), and low Alzheimer's disease likelihood group according to the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria. Outcome measures were the proportion of subjects with Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage and progression to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia. We performed survival analyses using Cox proportional hazards models. According to the International Working Group-1 criteria, 850 (53%) subjects had prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Their 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia was 50% compared to 21% for subjects without prodromal Alzheimer's disease. According to the International Working Group-2 criteria, 308 (40%) subjects had prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Their 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia was 61% compared to 22% for subjects without prodromal Alzheimer's disease. According to the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria, 353 (46%) subjects were in the high Alzheimer's disease likelihood group, 49 (6%) in the isolated amyloid pathology group, 220 (29%) in the suspected non-Alzheimer pathophysiology group, and 144 (19%) in the low Alzheimer's disease likelihood group. The 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia was 59% in the high Alzheimer's disease likelihood group, 22% in the isolated amyloid pathology group, 24% in the suspected non-Alzheimer pathophysiology group, and 5% in the low Alzheimer's disease likelihood group. Our findings support the use of the proposed research criteria to identify Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage. In clinical settings, the use of both amyloid and neuronal injury markers as proposed by the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria offers the most accurate prognosis. For clinical trials, selection of subjects in the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association high Alzheimer's disease likelihood group or the International Working Group-2 prodromal Alzheimer's disease group could be considered.


#105 Genetic pleiotropy between multiple sclerosis and schizophrenia but not bipolar disorder: differential involvement of immune-related gene loci. Link logo

Andreassen, OA; Harbo, HF ; Wang, Y ; Thompson, WK ; Schork, AJ ; Mattingsdal, M ; Zuber, V ; Bettella, F; Ripke, S ; Kelsoe, JR ; Kendler, KS ; O¿Donovan, MC ; Sklar, P ; McEvoy, LK ; Desikan, RS ; Lie, BA; Djurovic, S ; Dale, AM ; , ; ,

Molecular Psychiatry Volume 20, Issue 2, Pages 207–214

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Converging evidence implicates immune abnormalities in schizophrenia (SCZ), and recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified immune-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with SCZ. Using the conditional false discovery rate (FDR) approach, we evaluated pleiotropy in SNPs associated with SCZ (n=21 856) and multiple sclerosis (MS) (n=43 879), an inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Because SCZ and bipolar disorder (BD) show substantial clinical and genetic overlap, we also investigated pleiotropy between BD (n=16 731) and MS. We found significant genetic overlap between SCZ and MS and identified 21 independent loci associated with SCZ, conditioned on association with MS. This enrichment was driven by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Importantly, we detected the involvement of the same human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles in both SCZ and MS, but with an opposite directionality of effect of associated HLA alleles (that is, MS risk alleles were associated with decreased SCZ risk). In contrast, we found no genetic overlap between BD and MS. Considered together, our findings demonstrate genetic pleiotropy between SCZ and MS and suggest that the MHC signals may differentiate SCZ from BD susceptibility.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 28 January 2014; doi:10.1038/mp.2013.195.


#106 MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis (MASK-rhinitis): the new generation guideline implementation PDF logo

Bousquet J, Schunemann HJ, Fonseca J, Samolinski B, Bachert C, Canonica GW, Casale T, Cruz AA, Demoly P, Hellings P, Valiulis A, Wickman M, Zuberbier T, Bosnic-Anticevitch S, Bedbrook A, Bergmann KC, Caimmi D, Dahl R, Fokkens WJ, Grisle I, Lodrup Carlsen K, Mullol J, Muraro A, Palkonen S, Papadopoulos N, Passalacqua G, Ryan D, Valovirta E, Yorgancioglu A, Aberer W, Agache I, Adachi M, Akdis CA, Akdis M, Annesi-Maesano I, Ansotegui IJ, Anto JM, Arnavielhe S, Arshad H, Baiardini I, Baigenzhin AK, Barbara C, Bateman ED, Beghe B, Bel EH, Ben Kheder A, Bennoor KS, Benson M, Bewick M, Bieber T, Bindslev-Jensen C, Bjermer L, Blain H, Boner AL, Boulet LP, Bonini M, Bonini S, Bosse I, Bourret R, Bousquet PJ, Braido F, Briggs AH, Brightling CE, Brozek J, Buhl R, Burney PG, Bush A, Caballero-Fonseca

Allergy Volume 70, Issue 11, Pages 1372–1392

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Several unmet needs have been identified in allergic rhinitis: identification of the time of onset of the pollen season, optimal control of rhinitis and comorbidities, patient stratification, multidisciplinary team for integrated care pathways, innovation in clinical trials and above all patient empowerment. MASK-rhinitis (MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis) is a simple system centred around the patient which was devised to fill many of these gaps using Information and Communications Technology (ICT) tools and a clinical decision support system (CDSS) based on the most widely used guideline in allergic rhinitis and its asthma co-morbidity (ARIA 2015 revision). It is one of the implementation systems of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA). Three tools are used for the electronic monitoring of allergic diseases: a cell phone-based daily visual analogue scale (VAS) assessment of disease control, CARAT (Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test) and the e-Allergy screening (Premedical system of early diagnosis of allergy and asthma based on online tools). These tools are combined with a clinical decision support system (CDSS) and are available in many languages. An e-CRF and an e-learning tool complete MASK. MASK is flexible and other tools can be added. It appears to be an advanced, global and integrated ICT answer for many unmet needs in allergic diseases which will improve policies and standards. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.


#107 Association of Cardiometabolic Multimorbidity With Mortality Link logo PDF logo

Di Angelantonio Emanuele, Kaptoge Stephen, Wormser David, Willeit Peter, Butterworth Adam S, Bansal Narinder, O'Keeffe Linda M, Gao Pei, Wood Angela M, Burgess Stephen, Freitag Daniel F, Pennells Lisa, Peters Sanne A, Hart Carole L, Haheim Lise Lund, Gillum Richard F, Nordestgaard Borge G, Psaty Bruce M, Yeap Bu B, Knuiman Matthew W et al;The Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration

JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association Volume 314, Issue 1

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The prevalence of cardiometabolic multimorbidity is increasing. To estimate reductions in life expectancy associated with cardiometabolic multimorbidity. Age- and sex-adjusted mortality rates and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using individual participant data from the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration (689 300 participants; 91 cohorts; years of baseline surveys: 1960-2007; latest mortality follow-up: April 2013; 128 843 deaths). The HRs from the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration were compared with those from the UK Biobank (499 808 participants; years of baseline surveys: 2006-2010; latest mortality follow-up: November 2013; 7995 deaths). Cumulative survival was estimated by applying calculated age-specific HRs for mortality to contemporary US age-specific death rates. A history of 2 or more of the following: diabetes mellitus, stroke, myocardial infarction (MI). All-cause mortality and estimated reductions in life expectancy. In participants in the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration without a history of diabetes, stroke, or MI at baseline (reference group), the all-cause mortality rate adjusted to the age of 60 years was 6.8 per 1000 person-years. Mortality rates per 1000 person-years were 15.6 in participants with a history of diabetes, 16.1 in those with stroke, 16.8 in those with MI, 32.0 in those with both diabetes and MI, 32.5 in those with both diabetes and stroke, 32.8 in those with both stroke and MI, and 59.5 in those with diabetes, stroke, and MI. Compared with the reference group, the HRs for all-cause mortality were 1.9 (95% CI, 1.8-2.0) in participants with a history of diabetes, 2.1 (95% CI, 2.0-2.2) in those with stroke, 2.0 (95% CI, 1.9-2.2) in those with MI, 3.7 (95% CI, 3.3-4.1) in those with both diabetes and MI, 3.8 (95% CI, 3.5-4.2) in those with both diabetes and stroke, 3.5 (95% CI, 3.1-4.0) in those with both stroke and MI, and 6.9 (95% CI, 5.7-8.3) in those with diabetes, stroke, and MI. The HRs from the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration were similar to those from the more recently recruited UK Biobank. The HRs were little changed after further adjustment for markers of established intermediate pathways (eg, levels of lipids and blood pressure) and lifestyle factors (eg, smoking, diet). At the age of 60 years, a history of any 2 of these conditions was associated with 12 years of reduced life expectancy and a history of all 3 of these conditions was associated with 15 years of reduced life expectancy. Mortality associated with a history of diabetes, stroke, or MI was similar for each condition. Because any combination of these conditions was associated with multiplicative mortality risk, life expectancy was substantially lower in people with multimorbidity.


#108 Relationship between lifestyle behaviors and obesity in children ages 9-11:Results from a 12-country study Link logo PDF logo

Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Barreira, Tiago V.; Broyles, Stephanie T.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Fogelholm, Mikael; Hu, Gang; Johnson, William D.; Kuriyan, Rebecca; Kurpad, Anura; Lambert, Estelle V.; Maher, Carol; Maia, Jose; Matsudo, Victor; Olds, Timothy; Onywera, Vincent; Sarmiento, Olga L.; Standage, Martyn; Tremblay, Mark S.; Tudor-Locke, Catrine

Obesity Volume 23, Issue 8, Pages 1696–1702

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The aim was to assess associations between lifestyle behaviors and obesity in a multinational study of children from 12 countries representing a wide range of human development. The sample included 6,025 children 9-11 years of age. Behavioral risk factors included nocturnal sleep duration, moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), television viewing (TV time), and healthy and unhealthy diet pattern scores. Multilevel analyses were used to obtain odds ratios for obesity expressed per standard deviation of each behavioral risk factor. The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for obesity from multilevel, multivariable models were 0.79 (0.71-0.90) for nocturnal sleep duration, 0.52 (0.45-0.60) for MVPA, 1.15 (1.05-1.27) for TV time, 1.08 (0.96-1.20) for healthy diet score, and 0.93 (0.83-1.04) for unhealthy diet score in boys and 0.71 (0.63-0.80) for nocturnal sleep duration, 0.43 (0.35-0.53) for MVPA, 1.07 (0.96-1.19) for TV time, 1.05 (0.93-1.19) for healthy diet score, and 0.96 (0.82-1.11) for unhealthy diet score in girls. Behavioral risk factors are important correlates of obesity in children, particularly low MVPA, short sleep duration, and high TV viewing.


#109 Novel methodologies for biomarker discovery in atherosclerosis Open access logo Link logo

Hoefer, Imo E.; Steffens, Sabine; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Baeck, Magnus; Badimon, Lina; Bochaton-Piallat, Marie-Luce; Boulanger, Chantal M.; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Egido, Jesus; Evans, Paul C.; Guzik, Tomasz; Kwak, Brenda R.; Landmesser, Ulf; Mayr, Manuel; Monaco, Claudia; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Tunon, Jose; Weber, Christian

European Heart Journal Volume 36, Issue 39, Pages 2635–2642

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Identification of subjects at increased risk for cardiovascular events plays a central role in the worldwide efforts to improve prevention, prediction, diagnosis, and prognosis of cardiovascular disease and to decrease the related costs. Despite their high predictive value on population level, traditional risk factors fail to fully predict individual risk. This position paper provides a summary of current vascular biomarkers other than the traditional risk factors with a special focus on the emerging -omics technologies. The definition of biomarkers and the identification and use of classical biomarkers are introduced, and we discuss the limitations of current biomarkers such as high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). This is complemented by circulating plasma biomarkers, including high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and the conceptual shift from HDL cholesterol levels to HDL composition/function for cardiovascular risk assessment. Novel sources for plasma-derived markers include microparticles, microvesicles, and exosomes and their use for current omics-based analytics. Measurement of circulating micro-RNAs, short RNA sequences regulating gene expression, has attracted major interest in the search for novel biomarkers. Also, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have become key complementary technologies in the search for new biomarkers, such as proteomic searches or identification and quantification of small metabolites including lipids (metabolomics and lipidomics). In particular, pro-inflammatory lipid metabolites have gained much interest in the cardiovascular field. Our consensus statement concludes on leads and needs in biomarker research for the near future to improve individual cardiovascular risk prediction.


#110 Transcription factor Nr4a1 couples sympathetic and inflammatory cues in CNS-recruited macrophages to limit neuroinflammation Link logo

Shaked Iftach, Hanna Richard N, Shaked Helena, Chodaczek Grzegorz, Nowyhed Heba N, Tweet George, Tacke Robert, Basat Alp Bugra, Mikulski Zbigniew, Togher Susan, Miller Jacqueline, Blatchley Amy, Salek-Ardakani Shahram, Darvas Martin, Kaikkonen Minna U, Thomas Graham D, Lai-Wing-Sun Sonia, Rezk Ayman, Bar-Or Amit, Glass Christopher K, Bandukwala Hozefa, Hedrick Catherine C

Nature Immunology Volume 16, Issue 12, Pages 1228–1234

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The molecular mechanisms that link the sympathetic stress response and inflammation remain obscure. Here we found that the transcription factor Nr4a1 regulated the production of norepinephrine (NE) in macrophages and thereby limited experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Lack of Nr4a1 in myeloid cells led to enhanced NE production, accelerated infiltration of leukocytes into the central nervous system (CNS) and disease exacerbation in vivo. In contrast, myeloid-specific deletion of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, protected mice against EAE. Furthermore, we found that Nr4a1 repressed autocrine NE production in macrophages by recruiting the corepressor CoREST to the Th promoter. Our data reveal a new role for macrophages in neuroinflammation and identify Nr4a1 as a key regulator of catecholamine production by macrophages.


#111 The effects of whey protein with or without carbohydrates on resistance training adaptations Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Hulmi, Juha;Laakso, Mia;Mero, Antti;Häkkinen, Keijo;Ahtiainen, Juha;Peltonen, Heikki

Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition Volume 12, Issue 1

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Nutrition intake in the context of a resistance training (RT) bout may affect body composition and muscle strength. However, the individual and combined effects of whey protein and carbohydrates on long-term resistance training adaptations are poorly understood. A four-week preparatory RT period was conducted in previously untrained males to standardize the training background of the subjects. Thereafter, the subjects were randomized into three groups: 30 g of whey proteins (n = 22), isocaloric carbohydrates (maltodextrin, n = 21), or protein + carbohydrates (n = 25). Within these groups, the subjects were further randomized into two whole-body 12-week RT regimens aiming either for muscle hypertrophy and maximal strength or muscle strength, hypertrophy and power. The post-exercise drink was always ingested immediately after the exercise bout, 2-3 times per week depending on the training period. Body composition (by DXA), quadriceps femoris muscle cross-sectional area (by panoramic ultrasound), maximal strength (by dynamic and isometric leg press) and serum lipids as basic markers of cardiovascular health, were analysed before and after the intervention. Twelve-week RT led to increased fat-free mass, muscle size and strength independent of post-exercise nutrient intake (P < 0.05). However, the whey protein group reduced more total and abdominal area fat when compared to the carbohydrate group independent of the type of RT (P < 0.05). Thus, a larger relative increase (per kg bodyweight) in fat-free mass was observed in the protein vs. carbohydrate group (P < 0.05) without significant differences to the combined group. No systematic effects of the interventions were found for serum lipids. The RT type did not have an effect on the adaptations in response to different supplementation paradigms. Post-exercise supplementation with whey proteins when compared to carbohydrates or combination of proteins and carbohydrates did not have a major effect on muscle size or strength when ingested two to three times a week. However, whey proteins may increase abdominal fat loss and relative fat-free mass adaptations in response to resistance training when compared to fast-acting carbohydrates.


#112 Which patients do not recover from shoulder impingement syndrome, either with operative treatment or with nonoperative treatment? : Subgroup analysis involving 140 patients at 2 and 5 years in a randomized study Open access logo Link logo

Ketola Saara; Lehtinen Janne; Rousi Timo; Nissinen Maunu; Huhtala Heini; Arnala Ilkka

Acta Orthopaedica Volume 86, Issue 6, Pages 641–646

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#113 Identification of six new susceptibility loci for invasive epithelial ovarian cancer Link logo

Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Ramus, Susan J.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Lee, Andrew; Shen, Howard C.; Beesley, Jonathan; Lawrenson, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Janet M.; Spindler, Tassja J.; Lin, Yvonne G.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Li, Qiyuan; Coe

Nature Genetics Volume 47, Issue 2, Pages 164–171

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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 12 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) susceptibility alleles. The pattern of association at these loci is consistent in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers who are at high risk of EOC. After imputation to 1000 Genomes Project data, we assessed associations of 11 million genetic variants with EOC risk from 15,437 cases unselected for family history and 30,845 controls and from 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers (3,096 with ovarian cancer), and we combined the results in a meta-analysis. This new study design yielded increased statistical power, leading to the discovery of six new EOC susceptibility loci. Variants at 1p36 (nearest gene, WNT4), 4q26 (SYNPO2), 9q34.2 (ABO) and 17q11.2 (ATAD5) were associated with EOC risk, and at 1p34.3 (RSPO1) and 6p22.1 (GPX6) variants were specifically associated with the serous EOC subtype, all with P < 5 × 10(-8). Incorporating these variants into risk assessment tools will improve clinical risk predictions for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.


#114 Akkermansia muciniphila adheres to enterocytes and strengthens the integrity of the epithelial cell layer PDF logo

Reunanen J; Kainulainen V; Huuskonen L; Ottman N; Belzer C; Huhtinen H; de Vos WM; Satokari R

Applied & Environmental Microbiology Volume 81, Issue 11, Pages 3655–3662

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Akkermansia muciniphila is a Gram-negative, mucin-degrading bacterium that resides in the gastrointestinal tract of human and animals. A. muciniphila has been linked with intestinal health and improved metabolic status in obese and type 2 diabetic subjects. Specifically, A. muciniphila has been shown to reduce high-fat diet-induced endotoxaemia, which develops as a result of the impaired gut barrier. Despite the accumulating evidence of A. muciniphila 's health-promoting effects, the interaction mechanisms of the bacterium with the host have received little attention. In this study, we investigated the adhesion of A. muciniphila to intestinal epithelium and its interaction with the host mucosa by using several in vitro models. We found that A. muciniphila adheres strongly to human colonic cell lines Caco-2 and HT-29, but not to human colonic mucus. In addition, A. muciniphila showed binding to the extracellular matrix protein laminin, but not to collagen I and IV, fibronectin or fetuin. Importantly, A. muciniphila improved enterocyte monolayer integrity as shown by a significant increase in the transepithelial resistance (TER) of Caco-2 co-cultures with the bacterium. Further, A. muciniphila induced IL-8 production in enterocytes at 100-fold higher cell concentrations as compared to Escherichia coli suggesting a very low pro-inflammatory activity in the epithelium. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that A. muciniphila adheres to the intestinal epithelium and strengthens the enterocyte monolayer integrity in vitro suggesting an ability to fortify impaired gut barrier. These results support the earlier associative in vivo studies and provide insights into the interaction of A. muciniphila with the host.


#115 Group psychoeducation with relaxation for severe fear of childbirth improves maternal adjustment and childbirth experience-a randomised controlled trial Link logo

Rouhe, Hanna;Salmela-Aro, Katariina;Toivanen, Riikka;Tokola, Maiju;Halmesmäki, Erja;Ryding, Elsa-Lena;Saisto, Terhi

Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology

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Abstract Background: Previous studies on the treatment of women with fear of childbirth have focused on the delivery mode. Women with fear of childbirth often suffer from anxiety and/or depression, and treatment therefore also needs to target postnatal psychological well-being and the early mother-infant relationship. Methods: Three hundred and seventy-one nulliparous women out of 4575 scored ≥100 in prospective screening (Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire, W-DEQ-A), indicating severe fear of childbirth. These women were randomised to psychoeducative group intervention with relaxation (n = 131; six sessions during pregnancy, one postnatal) or to conventional care (n = 240) by community nurses (referral if necessary). Psycho-emotional and psychosocial evaluations [Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), social support, Maternal Adjustment and Attitudes (MAMA), Traumatic Events Scale (TES) and the Wijma Delivery Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ-B)] were completed twice during pregnancy and/or 3 months postpartum. Results: Postnatal maternal adjustment (MAMA mean score 38.1 ± 4.3 versus 35.7 ± 5.0, p = 0.001) and childbirth experience (mean W-DEQ-B sum score 63.0 ± 29 versus 73.7 ± 32, p = 0.008) were better in the intervention group compared with controls. In hierarchical regression, social support, participating in intervention, and less fearful childbirth experience predicted better maternal adjustment. The level of postnatal depressive symptoms was significantly lower in the intervention group (mean sum score 6.4 ± 5.4 versus 8.0 ± 5.9 p = 0.04). There were no differences in the frequency of post-traumatic stress symptoms between the groups. Conclusions: In nulliparous women with severe fear of childbirth, participation in a targeted psychoeducative group resulted in better maternal adjustment, a less fearful childbirth experience and fewer postnatal depressive symptoms, compared with conventional care.


#116 Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis:A candidate gene study Link logo

Lee, Alice W.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Stram, Douglas A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Myers, Emily J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, M

Gynecologic Oncology Volume 136, Issue 3, Pages 542–548

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Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of how variability in genes involved in the gonadotropin signaling pathway impacts disease risk is warranted.


#117 Mechanisms of Action and Persistent Neuroplasticity by Drugs of Abuse

Korpi, Esa R.; den Hollander, Bjornar; Farooq, Usman; Vashchinkina, Elena; Rajkumar, Ramamoorthy; Nutt, David J.; Hyytiä, Petri; Dawe, Gavin S.

Pharmacological Reviews Volume 67, Issue 4

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Adaptation of the nervous system to different chemical and physiologic conditions is important for the homeostasis of brain processes and for learning and remembering appropriate responses to challenges. Although processes such as tolerance and dependence to various drugs of abuse have been known for a long time, it was recently discovered that even a single pharmacologically relevant dose of various drugs of abuse induces neuroplasticity in selected neuronal populations, such as the dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area, which persist long after the drug has been excreted. Prolonged (self-) administration of drugs induces gene expression, neurochemical, neurophysiological, and structural changes in many brain cell populations. These region-specific changes correlate with addiction, drug intake, and conditioned drugs effects, such as cue- or stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking. In rodents, adolescent drug exposure often causes significantly more behavioral changes later in adulthood than a corresponding exposure in adults. Clinically the most impairing and devastating effects on the brain are produced by alcohol during fetal development. In adult recreational drug users or in medicated patients, it has been difficult to find persistent functional or behavioral changes, suggesting that heavy exposure to drugs of abuse is needed for neurotoxicity and for persistent emotional and cognitive alterations. This review describes recent advances in this important area of research, which harbors the aim of translating this knowledge to better treatments for addictions and related neuropsychiatric illnesses.


#118 Biallelic mutations in BRCA1 cause a new Fanconi anemia subtype Link logo

Sawyer SL; Tian L; Kähkönen M; Schwartzentruber J; Kircher M; et al

Cancer Discovery Volume 5, Issue 2, Pages 135–142

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Deficiency in BRCA dependent DNA inter-strand crosslink (ICL) repair is intimately connected to breast cancer susceptibility and to the rare developmental syndrome, Fanconi Anemia (FA). Bona fide FA proteins, BRCA2 (FANCD1), PALB2 (FANCN), and BRIP1 (FANCJ) interact with BRCA1 during ICL repair. However, lack of detailed phenotypic and cellular characterization of a patient with biallelic BRCA1 mutations has precluded assignment of BRCA1 as a definitive FA susceptibility gene. Here we report the presence of biallelic BRCA1 mutations in a woman with multiple congenital anomalies consistent with a FA-like disorder and breast cancer at age 23. Patient cells exhibited deficiency in BRCA1 (FANCS) and Rad51 localization to DNA damage sites, combined with radial chromosome formation and hypersensitivity to ICL inducing agents. Restoration of these functions was achieved by ectopic introduction of a BRCA1 transgene. These observations provide evidence in support of BRCA1 as a new Fanconi anemia subtype (FA-S).


#119 Early Inhaled Budesonide for the Prevention of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Link logo

Bassler, Dirk; Plavka, Richard; Shinwell, Eric S.; Hallman, Mikko; Jarreau, Pierre-Henri; Carnielli, Virgilio; Van den Anker, Johannes N.; Meisner, Christoph; Engel, Corinna; Schwab, Matthias; Halliday, Henry L.; Poets, Christian F.

New England Journal of Medicine Volume 373, Issue 16, Pages 1497–1506

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Systemic glucocorticoids reduce the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia among extremely preterm infants, but they may compromise brain development. The effects of inhaled glucocorticoids on outcomes in these infants are unclear. We randomly assigned 863 infants (gestational age, 23 weeks 0 days to 27 weeks 6 days) to early (within 24 hours after birth) inhaled budesonide or placebo until they no longer required oxygen and positive-pressure support or until they reached a postmenstrual age of 32 weeks 0 days. The primary outcome was death or bronchopulmonary dysplasia, confirmed by means of standardized oxygen-saturation monitoring, at a postmenstrual age of 36 weeks. A total of 175 of 437 infants assigned to budesonide for whom adequate data were available (40.0%), as compared with 194 of 419 infants assigned to placebo for whom adequate data were available (46.3%), died or had bronchopulmonary dysplasia (relative risk, stratified according to gestational age, 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75 to 1.00; P=0.05). The incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia was 27.8% in the budesonide group versus 38.0% in the placebo group (relative risk, stratified according to gestational age, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.91; P=0.004); death occurred in 16.9% and 13.6% of the patients, respectively (relative risk, stratified according to gestational age, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.91 to 1.69; P=0.17). The proportion of infants who required surgical closure of a patent ductus arteriosus was lower in the budesonide group than in the placebo group (relative risk, stratified according to gestational age, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.83; P=0.004), as was the proportion of infants who required reintubation (relative risk, stratified according to gestational age, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.96; P=0.03). Rates of other neonatal illnesses and adverse events were similar in the two groups. Among extremely preterm infants, the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia was lower among those who received early inhaled budesonide than among those who received placebo, but the advantage may have been gained at the expense of increased mortality. (Funded by the European Union and Chiesi Farmaceutici; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01035190.).


#120 Cognitive, behavioral, and autonomic correlates of mind wandering and perseverative cognition in major depression.

Ottaviani C; Shahabi L; Tarvainen M; Cook I; Abrams M; Shapiro D

Frontiers in Neuroscience

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Autonomic dysregulation has been hypothesized to play a role in the relationships between psychopathology and cardiovascular risk. An important transdiagnostic factor that has been associated with autonomic dysfunction is perseverative cognition (PC), mainly present in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in the form of rumination. As the ability to adaptively let our mind wander without ruminating is critical to mental health, this study aimed to examine the autonomic concomitants of functional vs. dysfunctional intrusive thoughts in MDD. Ambulatory heart rate (HR) and variability (HRV) of 18 MDD subjects and 18 healthy controls were recorded for 24 h. Approximately every 30 min during waking hours subjects reported their ongoing thoughts and moods using electronic diaries. Random regression models were performed. Compared to controls, MDD subjects were more often caught during episodes of PC. In both groups, PC required more effort to be inhibited and interfered more with ongoing activities compared to mind wandering (MW) (ps < 0.0001). This cognitive rigidity was mirrored by autonomic inflexibility, as PC was characterized by lower HRV (p < 0.0001) compared to MW. A worse mood was reported by MDD patients compared to controls, independently of their ongoing cognitive process. Controls, however, showed the highest mood worsening during PC compared to being on task and MW. HRV during rumination correlated with self-reported somatic symptoms on the same day and several dispositional traits. MDD subjects showed lower HRV during sleep, which correlated with hopelessness rumination. Results show that PC is associated with autonomic dysfunctions in both healthy and MDD subjects. Understanding when spontaneous thought is adaptive and when it is not may clarify its role in the etiology of mood disorders, shedding light on the still unexplained association between psychopathology, chronic stress, and risk for health.


#121 Increased risk of diabetes with statin treatment is associated with impaired insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion: a 6 year follow-up study of the METSIM cohort PDF logo

Cederberg H; Stancáková ; Yaluri N; Modi S; Kuusisto J; Laakso M

Diabetologia Volume 58, Issue 5, Pages 1109–1117

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The aim of this work was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the risk of type 2 diabetes associated with statin treatment in the population-based Metabolic Syndrome in Men (METSIM) cohort.


#122 New insights into the pathophysiology of dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes Link logo PDF logo

Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Boren, Jan

Atherosclerosis (00219150) Volume 239, Issue 2

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Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality for patients with type 2 diabetes, despite recent significant advances in management strategies to lessen CVD risk factors. A major cause is the atherogenic dyslipidemia, which consists of elevated plasma concentrations of both fasting and postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs), small dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The different components of diabetic dyslipidemia are not isolated abnormalities but closely linked to each other metabolically. The underlying disturbances are hepatic overproduction and delayed clearance of TRLs. Recent results have unequivocally shown that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and their remnants are atherogenic. To develop novel strategies for the prevention and treatment of dyslipidaemia, it is essential to understand the pathophysiology of dyslipoproteinaemia in humans. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic dyslipidemia.


#123 De novo loss- or gain-of-function mutations in KCNA2 cause epileptic encephalopathy Link logo

Syrbe, Steffen; Hedrich, Ulrike B. S.; Riesch, Erik; Djemie, Tania; Mueller, Stephan; Moller, Rikke S.; Maher, Bridget; Hernandez-Hernandez, Laura; Synofzik, Matthis; Caglayan, Hande S.; Arslan, Mutluay; Serratosa, Jose M.; Nothnagel, Michael; May, Patric

Nature Genetics Volume 47, Issue 4

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Epileptic encephalopathies are a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of severe epilepsies accompanied by intellectual disability and other neurodevelopmental features. Using next-generation sequencing, we identified four different de novo mutations in KCNA2, encoding the potassium channel KV1.2, in six isolated patients with epileptic encephalopathy (one mutation recurred three times independently). Four individuals presented with febrile and multiple afebrile, often focal seizure types, multifocal epileptiform discharges strongly activated by sleep, mild to moderate intellectual disability, delayed speech development and sometimes ataxia. Functional studies of the two mutations associated with this phenotype showed almost complete loss of function with a dominant-negative effect. Two further individuals presented with a different and more severe epileptic encephalopathy phenotype. They carried mutations inducing a drastic gain-of-function effect leading to permanently open channels. These results establish KCNA2 as a new gene involved in human neurodevelopmental disorders through two different mechanisms, predicting either hyperexcitability or electrical silencing of KV1.2-expressing neurons.


#124 Work stress as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease PDF logo

Kivimäki, Mika; Kawachi, I.

Current Cardiology Reports Volume 17, Issue 9

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The role of psychosocial work stress as a risk factor for chronic disease has been the subject of considerable debate. Many researchers argue in support of a causal connection while others remain skeptical and have argued that the effect on specific health conditions is either negligible or confounded. This review of evidence from over 600,000 men and women from 27 cohort studies in Europe, the USA and Japan suggests that work stressors, such as job strain and long working hours, are associated with a moderately elevated risk of incident coronary heart disease and stroke. The excess risk for exposed individuals is 10-40 % compared with those free of such stressors. Differences between men and women, younger versus older employees and workers from different socioeconomic backgrounds appear to be small, indicating that the association is robust. Meta-analyses of a wider range of health outcomes show additionally an association between work stress and type 2 diabetes, though not with common cancers or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, suggesting outcome specificity. Few studies have addressed whether mitigation of work stressors would reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. In view of the limited interventional evidence on benefits, harms and cost-effectiveness, definitive recommendations have not been made (e.g. by the US Preventive Services Taskforce) for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease via workplace stress reduction. Nevertheless, governments are already launching healthy workplace campaigns, and preventing excessive work stress is a legal obligation in several countries. Promoting awareness of the link between stress and health among both employers and workers is an important component of workplace health promotion.


#125 Rac1 Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling Drives Nuclear Shape Changes and Tumor Invasion Link logo PDF logo

Navarro-Lerida, Inmaculada; Pellinen, Teijo; Sanchez, Susana A.; Guadamillas, Marta C.; Wang, Yinhai; Mirtti, Tuomas; Calvo, Enrique; Del Pozo, Miguel A.

Developmental Cell

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Nuclear membrane microdomains are proposed to act as platforms for regulation of nuclear function, but little is known about the mechanisms controlling their formation. Organization of the plasma membrane is regulated by actin polymerization, and the existence of an actin pool in the nucleus suggests that a similar mechanism might operate here. We show that nuclear membrane organization and morphology are regulated by the nuclear level of active Rac1 through actin polymerization-dependent mechanisms. Rac1 nuclear export is mediated by two internal nuclear export signals and through its interaction with nucleophosmin-1 (B23), which acts as a Rac1 chaperone inside the nucleus. Rac1 nuclear accumulation alters the balance between cytosolic Rac1 and Rho, increasing RhoA signaling in the cytoplasm and promoting a highly invasive phenotype. Nuclear Rac1 shuttling is a finely tuned mechanism for controlling nuclear shape and organization and cell invasiveness.


#126 Human Microbiome:When a Friend Becomes an Enemy Link logo PDF logo

Muszer, Magdalena; Noszczynska, Magdalena; Kasperkiewicz, Katarzyna; Skurnik, Mikael

Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis Volume 63, Issue 4

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The microorganisms that inhabit humans are very diverse on different body sites and tracts. Each specific niche contains a unique composition of the microorganisms that are important for a balanced human physiology. Microbial cells outnumber human cells by tenfold and they function as an invisible organ that is called the microbiome. Excessive use of antibiotics and unhealthy diets pose a serious danger to the composition of the microbiome. An imbalance in the microbial community may cause pathological conditions of the digestive system such as obesity, cancer and inflammatory bowel disease; of the skin such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and acne and of the cardiovascular system such as atherosclerosis. An unbalanced microbiome has also been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and multiple sclerosis. While the microbiome has a strong impact on the development of the host immune system, it is suspected that it can also be the cause of certain autoimmune diseases, including diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis. Despite the enormous progress in the field, the interactions between the human body and its microbiome still remain largely unknown. A better characterization of the interactions may allow for a deeper understanding of human disease states and help to elucidate a possible association between the composition of the microbiome and certain pathologies. This review focuses on general findings that are related to the area and provides no detailed information about the case of study. The aim is to give some initial insight on the studies of the microbiome and its connection with human health.


#127 Physical Activity, Sedentary Time, and Obesity in an International Sample of Children Link logo

Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Barreira, Tiago V.; Broyles, Stephanie T.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Fogelholm, Mikael; Hu, Gang; Johnson, William D.; Kuriyan, Rebecca; Kurpad, Anura; Lambert, Estelle V.; Maher, Carol; Maia, Jose; Matsudo, Victor; Olds, Timothy; Onywera, Vincent; Sarmiento, Olga L.; Standage, Martyn; Tremblay, Mark S.; Tudor-Locke, Catrine

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise Volume 47, Issue 10, Pages 2062–2069

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To determine the relationships between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), vigorous physical activity (VPA), sedentary time and obesity in children from 12 countries representing a wide range of human development.


#128 AIP inactivation leads to pituitary tumorigenesis through defective G alpha(i)-cAMP signaling Link logo

Tuominen, I.; Heliovaara, E.; Raitila, A.; Rautiainen, M-R; Mehine, M.; Katainen, R.; Donner, I.; Aittomaki, V.; Lehtonen, H. J.; Ahlsten, M.; Kivipelto, L.; Schalin-Jantti, C.; Arola, Johanna; Hautaniemi, S.; Karhu, A.

Oncogene

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Metastatic growth in breast cancer (BC) has been proposed as an exclusive property of cancer stem cells (CSCs). However, formal proof of their identity as cells of origin of recurrences at distant sites and the molecular events that may contribute to tumor cell dissemination and metastasis development are yet to be elucidated. In this study, we analyzed a set of patient-derived breast cancer stem cell (BCSC) lines. We found that in vitro BCSCs exhibit a higher chemoresistance and migratory potential when compared with differentiated, nontumorigenic, breast cancer cells (dBCCs). By developing an in vivo metastatic model simulating the disease of patients with early BC, we observed that BCSCs is the only cell population endowed with metastatic potential. Gene-expression profile studies comparing metastagenic and non-metastagenic cells identified TAZ, a transducer of the Hippo pathway and biomechanical cues, as a central mediator of BCSCs metastatic ability involved in their chemoresistance and tumorigenic potential. Overexpression of TAZ in low-expressing dBCCs induced cell transformation and conferred tumorigenicity and migratory activity. Conversely, loss of TAZ in BCSCs severely impaired metastatic colonization and chemoresistance. In clinical data from 99 BC patients, high expression levels of TAZ were associated with shorter disease-free survival in multivariate analysis, thus indicating that TAZ may represent a novel independent negative prognostic factor. Overall, this study designates TAZ as a novel biomarker and a possible therapeutic target for BC.Oncogene advance online publication, 17 February 2014; doi:10.1038/onc.2014.5.


#129 Role of dentin MMPs in caries progression and bond stability Link logo PDF logo

Mazzoni A; Tjäderhane L; Checchi V; Di Lenarda R; Salo T; Tay FR; Pashley DH; Breschi L

Journal of Dental Research Volume 94, Issue 2, Pages 241–251

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Dentin can be described as a biological composite with collagen matrix embedded with nanosized hydroxyapatite mineral crystallites. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins are families of endopeptidases. Enzymes of both families are present in dentin and collectively capable of degrading virtually all extracellular matrix components. This review describes these enzymes and their presence in dentin, mainly focusing on their role in dentin caries pathogenesis and loss of collagen in the adhesive hybrid layer under composite restorations. MMPs and cysteine cathepsins present in saliva, mineralized dentin, and/or dentinal fluid may affect the dentin caries process at the early phases of demineralization. Changes in collagen and noncollagenous protein structure may participate in observed decreases in mechanical properties of caries-affected dentin and reduce the ability of caries-affected dentin to remineralize. These endogenous enzymes also remain entrapped within the hybrid layer during the resin infiltration process, and the acidic bonding agents themselves (irrespective of whether they are etch-and-rinse or self-etch) can activate these endogenous protease proforms. Since resin impregnation is frequently incomplete, denuded collagen matrices associated with free water (which serves as a collagen cleavage reagent for these endogenous hydrolase enzymes) can be enzymatically disrupted, finally contributing to the degradation of the hybrid layer. There are multiple in vitro and in vivo reports showing that the longevity of the adhesive interface is increased when nonspecific enzyme-inhibiting strategies are used. Different chemicals (i.e., chlorhexidine, galardin, and benzalkonium chloride) or collagen cross-linker agents have been successfully employed as therapeutic primers in the bonding procedure. In addition, the incorporation of enzyme inhibitors (i.e., quaternary ammonium methacrylates) into the resin blends has been recently promoted. This review will describe MMP functions in caries and hybrid layer degradation and explore the potential therapeutic role of MMP inhibitors for the development of improved intervention strategies for MMP-related oral diseases.


#130 Rationale and methods for a randomized controlled trial of a movement-to-music video program for decreasing sedentary time among mother-child pairs Link logo

Tuominen P; Husu P; Raitanen J; Luoto R

BMC Public Health Volume 15, Issue 1

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Measured objectively, under a quarter of adults and fewer than half of preschool children meet the criteria set in the aerobic physical activity recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Moreover, adults reportedly are sedentary (seated or lying down) for most of their waking hours. Importantly, greater amounts of sedentary time on parents' part are associated with an increased risk of more sedentary time among their children. A randomized controlled trial targeting mother-child pairs has been designed, to examine whether a movement-to-music video program may be effective in reducing sedentary time and increasing physical activity in the home environment. Mother-child pairs (child age of 4-7 years) will be recruited from among NELLI lifestyle-modification study five-year follow-up cohort participants, encompassing 14 municipalities in Pirkanmaa region, Finland. Accelerometer and exercise diary data are to be collected for intervention and control groups at the first, second and eighth week after the baseline measurements. Background factors, physical activity, screen time, motivation to exercise, and self-reported height and weight, along with quality of life, will be assessed via questionnaires. After the baseline and first week measurements, the participants of the intervention group will receive a movement-to-music video program designed to reduce sedentary time and increase physical activity. Intervention group mother-child pairs will be instructed to exercise every other day while watching the video program over the next seven weeks. Information on experiences of the use of the movement-to-music video program will be collected 8 weeks after baseline. Effects of the intervention will be analyzed in line with the intention-to-treat principle through comparison of the changes in the main outcomes between intervention and control group participants. The study has received ethics approval from the Pirkanmaa Ethics Committee in Human Sciences. The study will yield information on the effectiveness of movement-to-music video exercise in reducing sedentary behavior. Intervention-based methods have proven effective in increasing physical activity in home environments. Music may improve exercise adherence, which creates a possibility of achieving long-term health benefits. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, as NCT02270138 . It was registered on October 2, 2014.


#131 Non-pharmacological interventions as a best practice strategy in people with dementia living in nursing homes

Cabrera E; Sutcliffe C; Verbeek H; Saks K; Soto-Martin M; Meyer G; Leino-Kilpi H; Karlsson S; Zabalegui A

European Geriatric Medicine Volume 6, Issue 2

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#132 A Prospective Biopsychosocial Study of the Persistent Post-Concussion Symptoms following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Link logo

Wäljas M; Iverson GL; Lange RT; Hakulinen U; Dastidar P; Huhtala H; Liimatainen S; Hartikainen K; Öhman J

Journal of Neurotrauma

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This study examined multiple biopsychosocial factors relating to post-concussion symptom (PCS) reporting in patients with mild traumatic brain injuries (MTBI), including structural (CT and MRI) and microstructural neuroimaging (diffusion tensor imaging; DTI). Patients with MTBIs completed several questionnaires and cognitive testing at approximately one month (N=126) and one year post injury (N=103). At approximately three weeks post injury, DTI was undertaken using a Siemens 3T scanner in a subgroup (N=71). Measures of fractional anisotropy (FA) were calculated for 16 regions of interest (ROIs) and measures of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were calculated for 10 ROIs. Patients were compared to healthy control subjects. Using ICD-10 postconcussional syndrome (PCS) criteria and mild or greater symptom reporting, 59% of the MTBI sample met criteria at one month and 38% met criteria at one year. However, 31% of the healthy control sample also met criteria for the syndrome-illustrating a high false positive rate. Significant predictors of ICD-10 PCS at one month were pre-injury mental health problems and the presence of extra-cranial bodily injuries. Being symptomatic at one month was a significant predictor of being symptomatic at one year, and depression was significantly related to PCS at both one month and one year. Intracranial abnormalities visible on MRI were present in 12.1% of this sample, and multifocal areas of unusual white matter as measured by DTI were present in 50.7% (compared to 12.4% of controls). Structural MRI abnormalities and microstructural white matter findings were not significantly associated with greater post-concussion symptom reporting. The personal experience and reporting of post-concussion symptoms is likely individualized, representing the cumulative effect of multiple variables, such as genetics, mental health history, current life stress, medical problems, chronic pain, depression, personality factors, and other psychosocial and environmental factors. The extent to which damage to the structure of the brain contributes to the persistence of post-concussion symptoms remains unclear.


#133 Too Fit To Fracture : outcomes of a Delphi consensus process on physical activity and exercise recommendations for adults with osteoporosis with or without vertebral fractures Link logo PDF logo

Giangregorio, L. M.;McGill, S.;Wark, J. D.;Laprade, J.;Heinonen, Ari;Ashe, M. C.;MacIntyre, N. J.;Cheung, A. M.;Shipp, K.;Keller, H.;Jain, R.;Papaioannou, A.

Osteoporosis International Volume 26, Issue 3, Pages 891–910

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An international consensus process resulted in exercise and physical activity recommendations for individuals with osteoporosis. Emphasis was placed on strength, balance, and postural alignment. Rather than providing generic restrictions, activity should be encouraged while considering impairments, fracture risk, activity history, and preference, and guidance on spine sparing techniques should be provided.


#134 Stem cells, mitochondria and aging Link logo

Ahlqvist, Kati J.; Suomalainen, Anu; Hamalainen, Riikka H.

Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA)

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Decline in metabolism and regenerative potential of tissues are common characteristics of aging. Regeneration is maintained by somatic stem cells (SSCs), which require tightly controlled energy metabolism and genomic integrity for their homeostasis. Recent data indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction may compromise this homeostasis, and thereby contribute to tissue degeneration and aging. Progeroid Mutator mouse, accumulating random mtDNA point mutations in their SSCs, showed disturbed SSC homeostasis, emphasizing the importance of mtDNA integrity for stem cells. The mechanism involved changes in cellular redox-environment, including subtle increase in reactive oxygen species (H2O2 and superoxide anion), which did not cause oxidative damage, but disrupted SSC function. Mitochondrial metabolism appears therefore to be an important regulator of SSC fate determination, and defects in it in SSCs may underlie premature aging. Here we review the current knowledge of mitochondrial contribution to SSC dysfunction and aging. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Aging.


#135 Advances in heart rate variability signal analysis : joint position statement by the e-Cardiology ESC Working Group and the European Heart Rhythm Association co-endorsed by the Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society. Link logo

Sassi, Roberto; Cerutti, Sergio; Lombardi, Federico; Malik, Marek; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Peng, Chung-Kang; Schmidt, Georg; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Gorenek, Bulent; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Grassi, Guido; Kudaiberdieva, Gulmira; Fisher, James P.; Zabel, Markus; Macfadyen Robert

Europace

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Following the publication of the Task Force document on heart rate variability (HRV) in 1996, a number of articles have been published to describe new HRV methodologies and their application in different physiological and clinical studies. This document presents a critical review of the new methods. A particular attention has been paid to methodologies that have not been reported in the 1996 standardization document but have been more recently tested in sufficiently sized populations. The following methods were considered: Long-range correlation and fractal analysis; Short-term complexity; Entropy and regularity; and Nonlinear dynamical systems and chaotic behaviour. For each of these methods, technical aspects, clinical achievements, and suggestions for clinical application were reviewed. While the novel approaches have contributed in the technical understanding of the signal character of HRV, their success in developing new clinical tools, such as those for the identification of high-risk patients, has been rather limited. Available results obtained in selected populations of patients by specialized laboratories are nevertheless of interest but new prospective studies are needed. The investigation of new parameters, descriptive of the complex regulation mechanisms of heart rate, has to be encouraged because not all information in the HRV signal is captured by traditional methods. The new technologies thus could provide after proper validation, additional physiological, and clinical meaning. Multidisciplinary dialogue and specialized courses in the combination of clinical cardiology and complex signal processing methods seem warranted for further advances in studies of cardiac oscillations and in the understanding normal and abnormal cardiac control processes.


#136 Targeting prodromal Alzheimer disease with avagacestat: a randomized clinical trial Link logo PDF logo

Coric Vladimir, Salloway Stephen, van Dyck Christopher H, Dubois Bruno, Andreasen Niels, Brody Mark, Curtis Craig, Soininen Hilkka, Thein Stephen, Shiovitz Thomas, Pilcher Gary, Ferris Steven, Colby Susan, Kerselaers Wendy, Dockens Randy, Soares Holly, Kaplita Stephen, Luo Feng, Pachai Chahin, Bracoud Luc, Mintun Mark, Grill Joshua D, Marek Ken, Seibyl John, Cedarbaum Jesse M, Albright Charles, Feldman Howard H, Berman Robert M

JAMA Neurology

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Early identification of Alzheimer disease (AD) is important for clinical management and affords the opportunity to assess potential disease-modifying agents in clinical trials. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a randomized trial to prospectively enrich a study population with prodromal AD (PDAD) defined by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker criteria and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) symptoms. To assess the safety of the γ-secretase inhibitor avagacestat in PDAD and to determine whether CSF biomarkers can identify this patient population prior to clinical diagnosis of dementia. A randomized, placebo-controlled phase 2 clinical trial with a parallel, untreated, nonrandomized observational cohort of CSF biomarker-negative participants was conducted May 26, 2009, to July 9, 2013, in a multicenter global population. Of 1358 outpatients screened, 263 met MCI and CSF biomarker criteria for randomization into the treatment phase. One hundred two observational cohort participants who met MCI criteria but were CSF biomarker-negative were observed during the same study period to evaluate biomarker assay sensitivity. Oral avagacestat or placebo daily. Safety and tolerability of avagacestat. Of the 263 participants in the treatment phase, 132 were randomized to avagacestat and 131 to placebo; an additional 102 participants were observed in an untreated observational cohort. Avagacestat was relatively well tolerated with low discontinuation rates (19.6%) at a dose of 50 mg/d, whereas the dose of 125 mg/d had higher discontinuation rates (43%), primarily attributable to gastrointestinal tract adverse events. Increases in nonmelanoma skin cancer and nonprogressive, reversible renal tubule effects were observed with avagacestat. Serious adverse event rates were higher with avagacestat (49 participants [37.1%]) vs placebo (31 [23.7%]), attributable to the higher incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer. At 2 years, progression to dementia was more frequent in the PDAD cohort (30.7%) vs the observational cohort (6.5%). Brain atrophy rate in PDAD participants was approximately double that of the observational cohort. Concordance between abnormal amyloid burden on positron emission tomography and pathologic CSF was approximately 87% (κ = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.48-0.87). No significant treatment differences were observed in the avagacestat vs placebo arm in key clinical outcome measures. Avagacestat did not demonstrate efficacy and was associated with adverse dose-limiting effects. This PDAD population receiving avagacestat or placebo had higher rates of clinical progression to dementia and greater brain atrophy compared with CSF biomarker-negative participants. The CSF biomarkers and amyloid positron emission tomography imaging were correlated, suggesting that either modality could be used to confirm the presence of cerebral amyloidopathy and identify PDAD. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00890890.


#137 King-Devick test normative reference values for professional male ice hockey players PDF logo

Vartiainen MV; Holm A; Peltonen K; Luoto TM; Iverson GL; Hokkanen L

Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports Volume 25, Issue 3, Pages e327–e330

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The King-Devick (K-D) test, a measure of processing speed, visual tracking, and saccadic eye movements, has shown promise as a supplemental screening test following concussion. However, limited normative data for this test have been published.The K-D test was administered to 185 professional ice hockey players as a preseason baseline test in seasons 2012-2013 and 2013-2014. Their average age was 23.8 years (median = 22.0 years, range = 16-40 years). The average K-D score was 40.0 s (SD = 6.1 s, range = 24.0-65.7 s). K-D test performance showed no association with age, education, or the number of self-reported previous concussions in this sample. The association between trials 1 and 2 of the K-D test was good (ICC = 0.92, Pearson = 0.93). Normative values of the K-D test for professional male ice hockey players are reported. K-D test performance did not vary by age, education, or concussion history in this study.


#138 Relationship Between Cortical Thickness and Functional Activation in the Early Blind Link logo PDF logo

Anurova, Irina; Renier, Laurent A.; De Volder, Anne G.; Carlson, Synnove; Rauschecker, Josef P.

Cerebral Cortex

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Early blindness results in both structural and functional changes of the brain. However, these changes have rarely been studied in relation to each other. We measured alterations in cortical thickness (CT) caused by early visual deprivation and their relationship with cortical activity. Structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 12 early blind (EB) humans and 12 sighted controls (SC). Experimental conditions included one-back tasks for auditory localization and pitch identification, and a simple sound-detection task. Structural and functional data were analyzed in a whole-brain approach and within anatomically defined regions of interest in sensory areas of the spared (auditory) and deprived (visual) modalities. Functional activation during sound-localization or pitch-identification tasks correlated negatively with CT in occipital areas of EB (calcarine sulcus, lingual gyrus, superior and middle occipital gyri, and cuneus) and in nonprimary auditory areas of SC. These results suggest a link between CT and activation and demonstrate that the relationship between cortical structure and function may depend on early sensory experience, probably via selective pruning of exuberant connections. Activity-dependent effects of early sensory deprivation and long-term practice are superimposed on normal maturation and aging. Together these processes shape the relationship between brain structure and function over the lifespan.


#139 The dynamics of expertise acquisition in sport: The role of affective learning design Link logo

Headrick, Jonathon;Renshaw, Ian;Davids, Keith;Pinder, Ross A.;Araújo, Duarte

Psychology of Sport & Exercise

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#140 Association of early exposure of probiotics and islet autoimmunity in the TEDDY Study Link logo PDF logo

Uusitalo Ulla; Liu Xiang; Yang Jimin; Andren Aronsson Carin; Hummel Sandra; Butterworth Martha; Lernmark Åke; Rewers Marian; Hagopian William; She Jin-Xiong; Simell Olli; Toppari Olli; Ziegler Anette; Akolkar Beena; Krischer Jeffrey; Norris Jill; Virtanen Suvi; TEDDY Study Group

JAMA Pediatrics Volume 170, Issue 1

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Probiotics have been hypothesized to affect immunologic responses to environmental exposures by supporting healthy gut microbiota and could therefore theoretically be used to prevent the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM)-associated islet autoimmunity. To examine the association between supplemental probiotic use during the first year of life and islet autoimmunity among children at increased genetic risk of T1DM. In this ongoing prospective cohort study that started September 1, 2004, children from 6 clinical centers, 3 in the United States (Colorado, Georgia/Florida, and Washington) and 3 in Europe (Finland, Germany, and Sweden), were followed up for T1DM-related autoantibodies. Blood samples were collected every 3 months between 3 and 48 months of age and every 6 months thereafter to determine persistent islet autoimmunity. Details of infant feeding, including probiotic supplementation and infant formula use, were monitored from birth using questionnaires and diaries. We applied time-to-event analysis to study the association between probiotic use and islet autoimmunity, stratifying by country and adjusting for family history of type 1 diabetes, HLA-DR-DQ genotypes, sex, birth order, mode of delivery, exclusive breastfeeding, birth year, child's antibiotic use, and diarrheal history, as well as maternal age, probiotic use, and smoking. Altogether 8676 infants with an eligible genotype were enrolled in the follow-up study before the age of 4 months. The final sample consisted of 7473 children with the age range of 4 to 10 years (as of October 31, 2014). Early intake of probiotics. Islet autoimmunity revealed by specific islet autoantibodies. Early probiotic supplementation (at the age of 0-27 days) was associated with a decreased risk of islet autoimmunity when compared with probiotic supplementation after 27 days or no probiotic supplementation (hazard ratio [HR], 0.66; 95% CI, 0.46-0.94). The association was accounted for by children with the DR3/4 genotype (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.21-0.74) and was absent among other genotypes (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.62-1.54). Early probiotic supplementation may reduce the risk of islet autoimmunity in children at the highest genetic risk of T1DM. The result needs to be confirmed in further studies before any recommendation of probiotics use is made.


#141 Prediction of human population responses to toxic compounds by a collaborative competition Open access logo Link logo

Eduati Federica, Mangravite Lara M, Wang Tao, Tang Hao, Bare J Christopher, Huang Ruili, Norman Thea, Kellen Mike, Menden Michael P, Yang Jichen, Zhan Xiaowei, Zhong Rui, Xiao Guanghua, Xia Menghang, Abdo Nour, Kosyk Oksana, The NIEHS-NCATS-UNC DREAM Toxicogenetics Collaboration* et al

Nature Biotechnology Volume 33, Issue 9, Pages 933–940

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The ability to computationally predict the effects of toxic compounds on humans could help address the deficiencies of current chemical safety testing. Here, we report the results from a community-based DREAM challenge to predict toxicities of environmental compounds with potential adverse health effects for human populations. We measured the cytotoxicity of 156 compounds in 884 lymphoblastoid cell lines for which genotype and transcriptional data are available as part of the Tox21 1000 Genomes Project. The challenge participants developed algorithms to predict interindividual variability of toxic response from genomic profiles and population-level cytotoxicity data from structural attributes of the compounds. 179 submitted predictions were evaluated against an experimental data set to which participants were blinded. Individual cytotoxicity predictions were better than random, with modest correlations (Pearson's r < 0.28), consistent with complex trait genomic prediction. In contrast, predictions of population-level response to different compounds were higher (r < 0.66). The results highlight the possibility of predicting health risks associated with unknown compounds, although risk estimation accuracy remains suboptimal.


#142 Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Link logo

Brunham, Robert C.; Gottlieb, Sami L.; Paavonen, Jorma

New England Journal of Medicine Volume 372, Issue 21, Pages 2039–2048

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Pelvic inflammatory disease can produce acute symptoms and result in infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain. This review summarizes current approaches to diagnosis and treatment and the future prospects for better prevention strategies.


#143 Perspective: Concepts of printing technologies for oral film formulations Open access logo

Maren Preis; Joerg Breitkreutz; Niklas Sandler

International Journal of Pharmaceutics Volume 494, Issue 2, Pages 578–584

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Different types of printing methods have recently attracted interest as emerging technologies for fabrication of drug delivery systems. If printing is combined with different oral film manufacturing technologies such as solvent casting and other techniques, multifunctional structures can be created to enable further complexity and high level of sophistication. This review paper intends to provide profound understanding and future perspectives for the potential use of printing technologies in the preparation of oral film formulations as novel drug delivery systems. The described concepts include advanced multi-layer coatings, stacked systems, and integrated bioactive multi-compartments, which comprise of integrated combinations of diverse materials to form sophisticated bio-functional constructs. The advanced systems enable tailored dosing for individual drug therapy, easy and safe manufacturing of high-potent drugs, development and manufacturing of fixed-dose combinations and product tracking for anti-counterfeiting strategies.


#144 Quantitative serum nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics in cardiovascular epidemiology and genetics

Soininen P; Kangas AJ; Würtz P; Suna T; Ala-Korpela M

Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics Volume 8, Issue 1

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Metabolomics is becoming common in epidemiology due to recent developments in quantitative profiling technologies and appealing results from their applications for understanding health and disease. Our team has developed an automated high-throughput serum NMR metabolomics platform that provides quantitative molecular data on 14 lipoprotein subclasses, their lipid concentrations and composition, apolipoprotein A-I and B, multiple cholesterol and triglyceride measures, albumin, various fatty acids as well as on numerous low-molecular-weight metabolites, including amino acids, glycolysis related measures and ketone bodies. The molar concentrations of these measures are obtained from a single serum sample with costs comparable to standard lipid measurements. We have analyzed almost 250 000 samples from around 100 epidemiological cohorts and biobanks and the new international set-up of multiple platforms will allow an annual throughput of more than 250 000 samples. The molecular data have been used to study type 1 and type 2 diabetes etiology as well as to characterize the molecular reflections of the metabolic syndrome, long-term physical activity, diet and lipoprotein metabolism. The results have revealed new biomarkers for early atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. We have also combined genomics and metabolomics in diverse studies. We envision that quantitative high-throughput NMR metabolomics will be incorporated as a routine in large biobanks; this would make perfect sense both from the biological research and cost point of view - the standard output of over 200 molecular measures would vastly extend the relevance of the sample collections and make many separate clinical chemistry assays redundant.


#145 Ultrasound-based testing of tendon mechanical properties: A critical evaluation Link logo PDF logo

Seynnes, O. R.;Bojsen-Møller, J.;Albracht, K.;Arndt, A;Cronin, Neil;Finni Juutinen, Taija;Magnusson, S. P.

Journal of Applied Physiology

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In the past twenty years, the use of ultrasound-based methods has become a standard approach to measure tendon mechanical properties in vivo. Yet, the multitude of methodological approaches adopted by various research groups probably contributes to the large variability of reported values. The technique of obtaining and relating tendon deformation to tensile force in vivo has been applied differently, depending on practical constraints or scientific points of view. Divergence can be seen in i) methodological considerations such as the choice of anatomical features to scan and to track, force measurements or signal synchronisation and ii), in physiological considerations related to the viscoelastic behaviour or length measurements of tendons. Hence, the purpose of the present review is to assess and discuss the physiological and technical aspects connected to in vivo testing of tendon mechanical properties. In doing so, our aim is to provide the reader with a systematic, qualitative analysis of ultrasound-based techniques. Finally, a list of recommendations is proposed for a number of selected issues.


#146 The open abdomen, indications, management and definitive closure Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Coccolini, Federico; Biffl, Walter; Catena, Fausto; Ceresoli, Marco; Chiara, Osvaldo; Cimbanassi, Stefania; Fattori, Luca; Leppaniemi, Ari; Manfredi, Roberto; Montori, Giulia; Pesenti, Giovanni; Sugrue, Michael; Ansaloni, Luca

World Journal of Emergency Surgery Volume 10, Issue 1

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The indications for Open Abdomen (OA) are generally all those situations in which is ongoing the development an intra-abdominal hypertension condition (IAH), in order to prevent the development of abdominal compartmental syndrome (ACS). In fact all those involved in care of a critically ill patient should in the first instance think how to prevent IAH and ACS. In case of ACS goal directed therapy to achieve early opening and early closure is the key: paradigm of closure shifts to combination of therapies including negative pressure wound therapy and dynamic closure, in order to reduce complications and avoid incisional hernia. There have been huge studies and progress in survival of critically ill trauma and septic surgical patients: this in part has been through the great work of pioneers, scientific societies and their guidelines; however future studies and continued innovation are needed to better understand optimal treatment strategies and to define more clearly the indications, because OA by itself is still a morbid procedure.


#147 Improving wear time compliance with a 24-hour waist-worn accelerometer protocol in the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE) Open access logo Link logo PDF logo

Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Barreira, Tiago V.; Schuna, John M.; Mire, Emily F.; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Fogelholm, Mikael; Hu, Gang; Kuriyan, Rebecca; Kurpad, Anura; Lambert, Estelle V.; Maher, Carol; Maia, Jose; Matsudo, Victor; Olds, Tim; Onywera, Vincent; Sarmiento, Olga L.; Standage, Martyn; Tremblay, Mark S.; Zhao, Pei; Church, Timothy S.

International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Volume 12, Issue 1

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We compared 24-hour waist-worn accelerometer wear time characteristics of 9-11 year old children in the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE) to similarly aged U.S. children providing waking-hours waist-worn accelerometer data in the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Valid cases were defined as having ≥4 days with ≥10 hours of waking wear time in a 24-hour period, including one weekend day. Previously published algorithms for extracting total sleep episode time from 24-hour accelerometer data and for identifying wear time (in both the 24-hour and waking-hours protocols) were applied. The number of valid days obtained and a ratio (percent) of valid cases to the number of participants originally wearing an accelerometer were computed for both ISCOLE and NHANES. Given the two surveys' discrepant sampling designs, wear time (minutes/day, hours/day) from U.S. ISCOLE was compared to NHANES using a meta-analytic approach. Wear time for the 11 additional countries participating in ISCOLE were graphically compared with NHANES. 491 U.S. ISCOLE children (9.92±0.03 years of age [M±SE]) and 586 NHANES children (10.43 ± 0.04 years of age) were deemed valid cases. The ratio of valid cases to the number of participants originally wearing an accelerometer was 76.7% in U.S. ISCOLE and 62.6% in NHANES. Wear time averaged 1357.0 ± 4.2 minutes per 24-hour day in ISCOLE. Waking wear time was 884.4 ± 2.2 minutes/day for U.S. ISCOLE children and 822.6 ± 4.3 minutes/day in NHANES children (difference = 61.8 minutes/day, p < 0.001). Wear time characteristics were consistently higher in all ISCOLE study sites compared to the NHANES protocol. A 24-hour waist-worn accelerometry protocol implemented in U.S. children produced 22.6 out of 24 hours of possible wear time, and 61.8 more minutes/day of waking wear time than a similarly implemented and processed waking wear time waist-worn accelerometry protocol. Consistent results were obtained internationally. The 24-hour protocol may produce an important increase in wear time compliance that also provides an opportunity to study the total sleep episode time separate and distinct from physical activity and sedentary time detected during waking-hours. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01722500 .


#148 Development of epilepsy after ischaemic stroke Link logo PDF logo

Pitkänen Asla, Roivainen Reina, Luasiuk Katarzyna

Lancet Neurology Volume 15, Issue 2

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For about 30% of patients with epilepsy the cause is unknown. Even in patients with a known risk factor for epilepsy, such as ischaemic stroke, only a subpopulation of patients develops epilepsy. Factors that contribute to the risk for epileptogenesis in a given individual generally remain unknown. Studies in the past decade on epilepsy in patients with ischaemic stroke suggest that, in addition to the primary ischaemic injury, existing difficult-to-detect microscale changes in blood vessels and white matter present as epileptogenic pathologies. Injury severity, location and type of pathological changes, genetic factors, and pre-injury and post-injury exposure to non-genetic factors (ie, the exposome) can divide patients with ischaemic stroke into different endophenotypes with a variable risk for epileptogenesis. These data provide guidance for animal modelling of post-stroke epilepsy, and for laboratory experiments to explore with increased specificity the molecular 'mechanisms, biomarkers, and treatment targets of post-stroke epilepsy in different circumstances, with the aim of modifying epileptogenesis after ischaemic stroke in individual patients without compromising recovery.


#149 Reisiluun periproteettisten murtumien ilmaantuvuus Kuopion yliopistollisessa sairaalassa vuosina 2008-2013 Open access logo Link logo

Lappalainen Janne, Miettinen Simo, Miettinen Hannu, Venesmaa Petri, Kröger Heikki

Current Opinion in Chemical Biology

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Near-infrared fluorescent proteins (NIR FPs), photoactivatable NIR FPs and NIR reporters of protein-protein interactions developed from bacterial phytochrome photoreceptors (BphPs) have advanced non-invasive deep-tissue imaging. Here we provide a brief guide to the BphP-derived NIR probes with an emphasis on their in vivo applications. We describe phenotypes of NIR FPs and their photochemical and intracellular properties. We discuss NIR FP applications for imaging of various cell types, tissues and animal models in basic and translational research. In this discussion, we focus on NIR FPs that efficiently incorporate endogenous biliverdin chromophore and therefore can be used as straightforward as GFP-like proteins. We also overview a usage of NIR FPs in different imaging platforms, from planar epifluorescence to tomographic and photoacoustic technologies.


#150 Polypharmacology Modelling Using Proteochemometrics (PCM): Recent Methodological Developments, Applications to Target Families, and Future Prospects Link logo PDF logo

Cortes-Ciriano, Isidro; Ain, Qurrat Ul; Subramanian, Vigneshwari; Lenselink, Eelke B.; Mendez-Lucio, Oscar ; IJzerman, Adriaan P. ; Wohlfahrt, Gerd; Prusis, Peteris; Malliavin, Thérèse E.; van Westen, Gerard J. P. ; Bender, Andreas

MedChemComm Volume 6, Issue 1, Pages 24–50

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#151 Characterization of Human Disease Phenotypes Associated with Mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR, and IFIH1 Link logo PDF logo

Crow, Yanick J.; Chase, Diana S.; Schmidt, Johanna Lowenstein; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Forte, Gabriella M. A.; Gornall, Hannah L.; Oojageer, Anthony; Anderson, Beverley; Pizzino, Amy; Helman, Guy; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S.; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M.; Ackroyd, Sam;

American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A Volume 167, Issue 2, Pages 296–312

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Aicardi-Goutières syndrome is an inflammatory disease occurring due to mutations in any of TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR or IFIH1. We report on 374 patients from 299 families with mutations in these seven genes. Most patients conformed to one of two fairly stereotyped clinical profiles; either exhibiting an in utero disease-onset (74 patients; 22.8% of all patients where data were available), or a post-natal presentation, usually within the first year of life (223 patients; 68.6%), characterized by a sub-acute encephalopathy and a loss of previously acquired skills. Other clinically distinct phenotypes were also observed; particularly, bilateral striatal necrosis (13 patients; 3.6%) and non-syndromic spastic paraparesis (12 patients; 3.4%). We recorded 69 deaths (19.3% of patients with follow-up data). Of 285 patients for whom data were available, 210 (73.7%) were profoundly disabled, with no useful motor, speech and intellectual function. Chilblains, glaucoma, hypothyroidism, cardiomyopathy, intracerebral vasculitis, peripheral neuropathy, bowel inflammation and systemic lupus erythematosus were seen frequently enough to be confirmed as real associations with the Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome phenotype. We observed a robust relationship between mutations in all seven genes with increased type I interferon activity in cerebrospinal fluid and serum, and the increased expression of interferon-stimulated gene transcripts in peripheral blood. We recorded a positive correlation between the level of cerebrospinal fluid interferon activity assayed within one year of disease presentation and the degree of subsequent disability. Interferon-stimulated gene transcripts remained high in most patients, indicating an ongoing disease process. On the basis of substantial morbidity and mortality, our data highlight the urgent need to define coherent treatment strategies for the phenotypes associated with mutations in the Aicardi-Goutières syndrome-related genes. Our findings also make it clear that a window of therapeutic opportunity exists relevant to the majority of affected patients and indicate that the assessment of type I interferon activity might serve as a useful biomarker in future clinical trials. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


#152 European Code against Cancer 4th edition : Ultraviolet radiation and cancer Open access logo Link logo

Greinert Rudiger; de Vries Esther; Erdmann Friederike; Espina Carolina; Auvinen Anssi; Kesminiene Ausrele; Schuz Joachim

Cancer Epidemiology

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Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is part of the electromagnetic spectrum emitted naturally from the sun or from artificial sources such as tanning devices. Acute skin reactions induced by UVR exposure are erythema (skin reddening), or sunburn, and the acquisition of a suntan triggered by UVR-induced DNA damage. UVR exposure is the main cause of skin cancer, including cutaneous malignant melanoma, basal-cell carcinoma, and squamous-cell carcinoma. Skin cancer is the most common cancer in fair-skinned populations, and its incidence has increased steeply over recent decades. According to estimates for 2012, about 100,000 new cases of cutaneous melanoma and about 22,000 deaths from it occurred in Europe. The main mechanisms by which UVR causes cancer are well understood. Exposure during childhood appears to be particularly harmful. Exposure to UVR is a risk factor modifiable by individuals' behaviour. Excessive exposure from natural sources can be avoided by seeking shade when the sun is strongest, by wearing appropriate clothing, and by appropriately applying sunscreens if direct sunlight is unavoidable. Exposure from artificial sources can be completely avoided by not using sunbeds. Beneficial effects of sun or UVR exposure, such as for vitamin D production, can be fully achieved while still avoiding too much sun exposure and the use of sunbeds. Taking all the scientific evidence together, the recommendation of the 4th edition of the European Code Against Cancer for ultraviolet radiation is: "Avoid too much sun, especially for children. Use sun protection. Do not use sunbeds."


#153 A validated gene regulatory network and GWAS identifies early regulators of T cell-associated diseases PDF logo

Gustafsson M, Gawel DR, Alfredsson L, Baranzini S, Bjorkander J, Blomgran R, Hellberg S, Eklund D, Ernerudh J, Kockum I, Konstantinell A, Lahesmaa R, Lentini A, Liljenstrom HRI, Mattson L, Matussek A, Mellergard J, Mendez M, Olsson T, Pujana MA, Rasool O, Serra-Musach J, Stenmarker M, Tripathi S, Viitala M, Wang H, Zhang H, Nestor CE, Benson M

Science Translational Medicine Volume 7, Issue 313, Pages 313ra178–313ra178

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Early regulators of disease may increase understanding of disease mechanisms and serve as markers for presymptomatic diagnosis and treatment. However, early regulators are difficult to identify because patients generally present after they are symptomatic. We hypothesized that early regulators of T cell-associated diseases could be found by identifying upstream transcription factors (TFs) in T cell differentiation and by prioritizing hub TFs that were enriched for disease-associated polymorphisms. A gene regulatory network (GRN) was constructed by time series profiling of the transcriptomes and methylomes of human CD4(+) T cells during in vitro differentiation into four helper T cell lineages, in combination with sequence-based TF binding predictions. The TFs GATA3, MAF, and MYB were identified as early regulators and validated by ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) and small interfering RNA knockdowns. Differential mRNA expression of the TFs and their targets in T cell-associated diseases supports their clinical relevance. To directly test if the TFs were altered early in disease, T cells from patients with two T cell-mediated diseases, multiple sclerosis and seasonal allergic rhinitis, were analyzed. Strikingly, the TFs were differentially expressed during asymptomatic stages of both diseases, whereas their targets showed altered expression during symptomatic stages. This analytical strategy to identify early regulators of disease by combining GRNs with genome-wide association studies may be generally applicable for functional and clinical studies of early disease development.


#154 Lower respiratory tract infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus: current management and new therapeutics PDF logo

Mazur N, Martinon-Torres F, Baraldi E, Fauroux B, Greenough A, Heikkinen T, Manzoni P, Mejias A, Nair H, Papadopoulos NG, Polack FP, Ramilo O, Sharland M, Stein R, Madhi SA, Bont L

The Lancet Respiratory Medicine Volume 3, Issue 11, Pages 888–900

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Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age. Evidence-based management guidelines suggest that there is no effective treatment for RSV lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and that supportive care, ie, hydration and oxygenation, remains the cornerstone of clinical management. However, RSV treatments in development in the past decade include 10 vaccines and 11 therapeutic agents in active clinical trials. Maternal vaccination is particularly relevant because the most severe disease occurs within the first 6 months of life, when children are unlikely to benefit from active immunisation. We must optimise the implementation of novel RSV therapeutics by understanding the target populations, showing safety, and striving for acceptable pricing in the context of this worldwide health problem. In this Review, we outline the limitations of RSV LRTI management, the drugs in development, and the remaining challenges related to study design, regulatory approval, and implementation.


#155 Prediction of individual genetic risk to prostate cancer using a polygenic score Link logo PDF logo

Szulkin Robert; Whitington Thomas; Eklund Martin; Aly Markus; Eeles Rosalind; Easton Douglas; Kote-Jarai ZSofia; Amin Al Olama Ali; Benlloch Sara; Muir Kenneth; Giles Graham; Southey Melissa; Fitzgerald Liesel; Henderson Brian; Schumacher Fredrick; Haiman Christopher; Schleutker Johanna; Wahlfors Tiina; Tammela Teuvo; Nordestgaard Børge et al

The Prostate Volume 75, Issue 13, Pages 1467–1474

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Polygenic risk scores comprising established susceptibility variants have shown to be informative classifiers for several complex diseases including prostate cancer. For prostate cancer it is unknown if inclusion of genetic markers that have so far not been associated with prostate cancer risk at a genome-wide significant level will improve disease prediction. We built polygenic risk scores in a large training set comprising over 25,000 individuals. Initially 65 established prostate cancer susceptibility variants were selected. After LD pruning additional variants were prioritized based on their association with prostate cancer. Six-fold cross validation was performed to assess genetic risk scores and optimize the number of additional variants to be included. The final model was evaluated in an independent study population including 1,370 cases and 1,239 controls. The polygenic risk score with 65 established susceptibility variants provided an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.67. Adding an additional 68 novel variants significantly increased the AUC to 0.68 (P = 0.0012) and the net reclassification index with 0.21 (P = 8.5E-08). All novel variants were located in genomic regions established as associated with prostate cancer risk. Inclusion of additional genetic variants from established prostate cancer susceptibility regions improves disease prediction. Prostate 9999: XX-XX, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


#156 Dominant Mutations in the Autoimmune Regulator AIRE Are Associated with Common Organ-Specific Autoimmune Diseases Link logo PDF logo

Oftedal, Bergithe E.; Hellesen, Alexander; Erichsen, Martina M.; Bratland, Eirik; Vardi, Ayelet; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Kemp, E. Helen; Fiskerstrand, Torunn; Viken, Marte K.; Weetman, Anthony P.; Fleishman, Sarel J.; Banka, Siddharth; Newman, William G.; Se

Immunity Volume 42, Issue 6, Pages 1185–1196

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The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene is crucial for establishing central immunological tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. Mutations in AIRE cause a rare autosomal-recessive disease, autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1), distinguished by multi-organ autoimmunity. We have identified multiple cases and families with mono-allelic mutations in the first plant homeodomain (PHD1) zinc finger of AIRE that followed dominant inheritance, typically characterized by later onset, milder phenotypes, and reduced penetrance compared to classical APS-1. These missense PHD1 mutations suppressed gene expression driven by wild-type AIRE in a dominant-negative manner, unlike CARD or truncated AIRE mutants that lacked such dominant capacity. Exome array analysis revealed that the PHD1 dominant mutants were found with relatively high frequency (>0.0008) in mixed populations. Our results provide insight into the molecular action of AIRE and demonstrate that disease-causing mutations in the AIRE locus are more common than previously appreciated and cause more variable autoimmune phenotypes.


#157 Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome/veno-occlusive disease:current situation and perspectives-a position statement from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) Link logo

Mohty, M.; Malard, F.; Abecassis, M.; Aerts, E.; Alaskar, A. S.; Aljurf, M.; Arat, M.; Bader, P.; Baron, F.; Bazarbachi, A.; Blaise, D.; Ciceri, F.; Corbacioglu, S.; Dalle, J-H; Duarte, R. F.; Fukuda, T.; Huynh, A.; Masszi, T.; Michallet, M.; Nagler, A.

Bone Marrow Transplantation

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Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome or veno-occlusive disease (SOS/VOD) is a potentially life-threatening complication of hematopoietic SCT (HSCT). This review aims to highlight, on behalf of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, the current knowledge on SOS/VOD pathophysiology, risk factors, diagnosis and treatments. Our perspectives on SOS/VOD are (i) to accurately identify its risk factors; (ii) to define new criteria for its diagnosis; (iii) to search for SOS/VOD biomarkers and (iv) to propose prospective studies evaluating SOS/VOD prevention and treatment in adults and children.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 23 March 2015; doi:10.1038/bmt.2015.52.


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